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DECEIVED 

SEP 4 1974 

UNIV. of M,*SS. 
ARCHIVES 



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http://www.archive.org/details/aggielife06mass 




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Oet. 2, 1895. 



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Massachusetts 

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VOL. VI. 



NO. 2. 



£ arpf rvtf r 



orerious^ 



BROTERS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



THE AMHERST 




STORE. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



EI. D. MARS 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



STUDENTS can buy at fair prices 



US, 



Is' F 

DE SUITS. 



Custom JVEaclfc? Clothings 

Suits as low as $12. Trousers as low as $3.50. 
Overcoats as low as $10. 



■ GO to the - 



DRIRY KITCHEN CAFE AND RESTIINT. 

Over Purity Bakery. 
MEALS AT ALL. HOURS. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes D Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 

E=.^0>E'S SHOE STOKE, 

■WILLIAMS' BX.OCK1. 

G. S. KENDRICK, 



DEALER IN 



'rovisions. 



South side Cutler's Block, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



I have the ammunition to fit 
you with. On your way to the 
Post Office stop and look at my 
stock of 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, 

DRESS SHIRTS, 
FOOT BALL GOODS, 
COLLARS AUNTTO CUFFS. 




HARRY OLARK, 

COLLEGE OTJTPITTEE, 



UNDER THE HOTEL. 




LIFE. 



VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 18, 1895. 



No. 1 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

F. P. WASHBURN, '96. Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. H. ROPER, '96. Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97. Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



Irtora&is. 



We wish to call special attention to the advertise- 
ment of Allen Bros, on another page. It is well for 
every member of the college to remember that the 
success of the Life depends in a large degree on the 
patronage which we receive from advertisers and if we 
are to continue to have a share of this patronage from 
the business public we must patronize those who are 
willing to use our columns. The firm of Allen Bros, 
is strictly reliable and the stock of goods which they 
have on hand is first-class and are offered to the stu- 
dents at a fair and honest price. 



There is every reason to believe that the college 
will have the best foot-ball team we have had for 
many years. With several men who have played on 
the 'varsity team for two or three seasons and an 
abundance of material to choose from in the freshman 



class it is evident that, with the proper amount of 
training and practice it will be no easy matter to score 
on our men. In Mr. Burrington the eleven has a man 
of unquestionable foot-ball ability and his ripe judgment 
and long experience will be of great value in selecting 
and training the men. The management and the col- 
lege are to be congratulated in having a man for cap- 
tain in whom every one has confidence that he will do 
the right thing and treat all men fairly. It only remains 
for us to give them the necessary financial support and 
for the management to arrange a sufficient number of 
games to insure a long list of victories. 



In connection with the comments on the small class 
entering this fall, we hear much dissatisfaction expressed 
among the older students. Some find fault with the 
course of study, some with their chances to work, and 
some with the lack of social advantages. Much of 
this complaint seems to have little real foundation. 
We believe that these fault finding students do not 
realize the opportunities that they may enjoy if they 
will. Doubtless there are more social advantages and 
more occurrences of interest at larger colleges, but 
few offer better chances for study and investigation 
than are found here. Having these opportunities, it is 
the student's own fault if he neglects to make the most 
of them and consequently becomes dissatisfied with 
the place. But even if dissatisfied, the student who is 
loyal to his college should not continually find fault 
with it in public. Especially at the present time when 
the institution has been rather unfortunate, we ought 
to strive at all times by word and deed to be loyal to 
our Alma Mater. 



In dealing with the exchanges, we shall, in the 
future as in the past, endeavor to clip those things 
which seem to us particularly pat, or timely, or repre- 
sentative of college life, or valuable for intrinsic worth 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and shall, moreover, try to give credit to whom credit 
is due for whatsoever is used. Our office is not that 
of critic and we shall not pose as such. Where com- 
ment seems necessary or advisable, we shall not hesi- 
tate to speak out, either in praise or blame, and we 
hope that our opinions will be received as given, in a 
spirit of kindliness and not of malice. We shall not 
confine ourselves wholly to college publications but 
shall draw from whatever source we must in order to 
make up a readable and interesting department. It 
shall be our aim to give our readers plentiful examples 
of college verse, deeming this one of the most valuable 
and interesting, and at the same time difficult kinds of 
composition. We trust that our relations with our 
contemporaries will remain, as heretofore, of the most 
amicable nature and shall do our best to preserve and 
promote those feelings. 



We are very much pleased with the outlook for a 
first-class glee and banjo club this year and it is the 
duty of the college to do something in a financial way 
to insure its success. In past years the members of 
the glee club have had to go down into their own pock- 
ets for support and to depend on the patronage which 
they received from outside concerts to defray a por- 
tion of their expenses. This is not as it should be. 
The glee and banjo clubs are as much deserving of 
support as are the foot-ball and base-ball teams, yet 
the latter receive a liberal output from the faculty and 
students. The concerts which have been held at the 
college in the past were but poorly attended and from 
a financial standpoint a failure, but from a musical 
point of view an acknowledged success. Any member 
of the college ought to be ashamed to say that the 
glee club is not deserving of his support and whatever 
may have been said in the past, which might perhaps 
have had a grain of truth in it regarding the training 
which the men received should not for a moment be 
entertained as the club is this year under the direction 
of one of the most competent instructors in this section 
of the country. Let every student in college do his 
utmost to insure its success. 



the other boat was to be the product of the British 
Isles. There was but one consideration, the creation 
of Watson must be able to outstand that of Herreshoff 
and vice versa. Months passed by. Experienced 
workmen, material from various quarters of the globe, 
and brains were made to contribute to this work. 
Directly and indirectly many thousands of dollars were 
expended. Two nations eagerly discussed the 
approaching trial of the rivals. The 7th day of Sept. 
witnessed the first struggle for supremacy. A hundred 
million people were in communication with New York; 
New York was in cable communication with steamer 
Mackay-Bennett. The story of the race is now famil- 
iar to all. The result carried joy to seventy millions 
of people, and gloom to many millions more. What 
was the cause of this lavish use of money, of this 
unbounded enthusiasm ? Was it the winning or 
defending of the cup ? The cup itself is worth only 
$150. No it was patriotism. The spirit shown in 
defending the cup year after year is the same spirit 
that leads men to fight for their country's honor and 
defense. Who then can say that these international 
races are not a good object lesson to Young America? 



orvfTriJ 



Many months ago two of the leading yacht design- 
ers and builders were given orders to build two yachts. 
No expense was to be spared. One boat was to be of 
American design, built and manned by Americans ; 



THE STORY OF THE KEARSARGE. 

The winter and spring of 1864 was a calamitous 
time for the American navy. The Southern Confed- 
eracy, having obtained the secret assistance of Great 
Britian, built and manned a large number of fast sail- 
ing cruisers for the express purpose of destroying the 
merchant marine of the Union. Previous to this 
time the merchant marine of the United States was 
the largest of any country in the world. Our ships 
sailed on all waters of the globe and the superiority 
of its navy had been one of the most important factors 
in the marvelous growth and prosperity of the United 
States. The Confederacy perceiving this, and having 
failed to a certain extent in their military operations 
on land, turned their attention to the destruction of the 
merchant marine of the Federal States. 

Of all the vessels built by the Confederacy for the 
purpose of destroying our shipping, probably no other 
acquired the fame or notoriety of the Alabama, This 
vessel was built and equipped in England. Its mis- 
sion was the destruction of our merchant marine. The 



Aggie life. 



Alabama, constructed both for speed and fighting, 
heavily armed and well manned, immediately com- 
menced operations. It has been stated that no ship 
ever sailed the seas which did so much injury to ship- 
ping as the Alabama. Being built so as to have su- 
perior speed she was able to escape her more formid- 
able enemies, while on the other hand she was able 
to follow up and destroy all the enemy's vessels weak- 
er than herself. 

Many unsuccessful attempts having been made to 
destroy this vessel, the United States government, ex- 
asperated with previous failures, equipped and sent 
out the powerful Kearsarge for the express purpose of 
destroying the Alabama. 

After many months of fruitless chase the enemy's 
vessel was at last sighted in Cherbourg harbor, a port 
in France, where she had put in for the purpose of 
coaling and refitting. Captain V/inslow and his gal- 
lant crew of the Kearsarge were at last to have a 
chance to show their mettle. Although short of coal 
and poorly prepared the Kearsarge immediately pro- 
ceeded to the scene of action, determined not to let 
her prey escape. 

Captain Semmes, commanding the Alabama, con- 
fident of the superiority of his vessel, immediately 
sent to the Kearsarge a challenge to fight which was 
eagerly accepted, Yet the Alabama, as if foresee- 
ing her fate, hesitated. For five long days the Kear- 
sarge steamed back and forth outside Cherbourg har- 
bor waiting for the evening to appear. 

Finally on a beautiful Sunday morning while the 
crew of the Kearsarge were at prayers a ship was 
sighted which soon proved to be the long waited for 
Alabama. Bibles and prayer-books were exchanged 
for muskets and cutlasses and soon all was ready for 
action. The Kearsarge, in order to prevent her an- 
tagonist from fleeing back to the French waters in 
case of defeat, immediately steamed for the open sea 
closely pursued by the Alabama, After getting a suf- 
ficient distance away from the French coast, the 
plucky Kearsarge turned about and sailed directly for 
her foe. The latter immediately opened a rapid fire. 
The Kearsarge waited until within close range, then, 
with deliberate and careful aim, broadside after broad- 
side was hurled against the fated vessel. So terrible 
was the fire from the Kearsarge and so deadly the 
effect that just one hour from the commencement of 



the battle the Alabama struck her colors. 

Thus in a single hour was fought one of the great- 
est naval battles of the world. The dreaded Alabama 
was destroyed and the American navy took a new 
start. After this great exploit, which alone was 
enough to render ever famous the names of both ship 
and crew, the vessel was refitted and both during and 
after, the war, did good work in the services of the 
American navy. 

On January 30, 1894, the historic old vessel sailed 
from Port au Prince, Hayti for Bluefields, Nicarauga, 
for the purpose of protecting American interests in the 
latter place. Three days after leaving port, on the 
evening of February 3, the vessel foundered on the 
famous Roncador reef and had to be abandoned. 
In a few months wind and wave completed the work 
of destruction and the remains of the gallant old Kear- 
sarge sank to their last resting place beneath the 
waves. H. T. E. 



FIRST YEAR 
Henry Simeon Ashley, 
Claud Addison Blair, 
John Cecil Burrington, 
Jose Dolores Bolivar Canto 
Ysidro Herrera Canto, 
Willie Arius Dye, 
Charles Leonard Humphrey, 
John Burt Isham, 
George Francis Keenan, 
Allen Lucas March, 
Francis E. Merriman, 
Charles Bemis Pendleton, 
Edward King Perry, 
Edward Hewett Sharpe, 
Bernard Howard Smith, 
Carl William Smith, 
Clifford Eli Stacy, 
George Harris Austin Thompson, 
Class of '99 
Dan Ashley Beaman, 
Albert Arthur Boutelle, 
William Edward Chapin, 
John Chauncy Chapman, 
Herbert Warner Dana, 
Carl Clifton Dickinson, 
John Remson Dutcher, 



97- 

East Longmeadow 

Amherst 

Charlemont 

Cansahcat, Yucatan 

Cansahcat, Yucatan 

Sheffield 

Amherst 

Hampden 

Boston 

Ashfield 

Shirley 

Willimansett 

Brookline 

Northfield 

Middlefield 

Melrose 

Gloucester 

Lancaster 

Leverett 

Leominster 

Chicopee 

South Amherst 

South Amherst 

South Amherst 

Nyack, N. Y. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Alfred Dewing Gile, 
Clarence Grey, 
Henry Day Holt, 
William Anson Hooker, 
George Cabel Hubbard, 
Morris Bernard Landers, 
Horace Eddy Maynard, 
Melvin Herbert Pingree, 
Samuel Eldredge Turner, 
Charles Morehouse Walker, 
Edwin M. Wright, 



Worcester 

Swampscott 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Sunderland 

Bondsville 

Amherst 

Denmark, Me. 

Housatonic 

Amherst 

Manteno, 111. 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION. 
The Young Men's Christian Association gave their 
annual reception to the Freshman class on Friday 
evening, Sept. 13. The faculty, students and resident 
graduates of the college were invited and a large 
number were present to assist the association in ex- 
tending a hearty welcome to the incoming class. 
The chapel was handsomely and elaborately decorated 
with ferns, palms, cut flowers and potted plants which 
were furnished through the generosity of Prof. May- 
nard and arranged under the supervision of Mr. E. A. 
White, '95. The committee of arrangements con- 
sisting of Messrs. Leavens, Clark and Tsuda, had the 
entire charge of the reception and to their efforts is 
due in a large measure the success of the event. 
The early part of the evening was spent in a social 
way and about nine o'clock the committee served a 
collation consisting of ice cream and cake. The 
association wish especially to thank Dr. C. S. Walker 
and the manager of the boarding club, Mr. P. A. 
Leamy for the valuable service which they so willingly 
gave. 

-a* 

A BASE BALL ROMANCE. 

The star first-baseman wooed a maid 

Extremely fair to see. 
"My heart strikes out for you," he said, 

" I pray thee fly with me." 

"Oh! that's a fair hit," she replied, 

(He felt the game at stake) 
"But he who scores 'gainst love like mine, 

Some sacrifice must make." 

He saw his error then, and took 

A short stop, but too late. 
She'd heard the tea-bell ring, and made 

A home run for the plate. 

—Jeff, in Univ. Cynic. 



Collet l^otfs- 



— Rope-pull to-day. 

—All out for foot-ball ! 

— Go pay your (taxes). 

— Where are the tennis directors ? 

— Holt and Hubbard, '98, have returned in '99. 

— Prof. Flint has been elected registrar of the 
college. 

— A number of Juniors are taking extra work in 
Chemistry. 

— Does anyone know whether or not there is a 
gymnasium in college ? 

— L. J. Shepard, ex-'94, has returned to college 
and has entered the class of '96. 

— C. A. King, '97, has succeeded F. L. Warren, 
'95, at the Meteorological station. 

— Prof. Flint has formed a small class in Chinese 
among the Sophomore and Junior classes. 

— B. K. Jones, '96, is bell-ringer for the year and 
J. W. Allen, '97, mail-carrier for the term. 

— E. B. Bragg, 75, has presented the college 
Zoological Museum a fine collection of eggs. 

— There are now 16,610 volumes in the college 
library, an increase of 1,170 since last September. 

— Telephone communications will soon be made 
between the different college buildings and the town. 

— During the winter term the seniors will have 
pistol practice in the shooting gallery of the new gun- 
shed. 

— Officers of the Athletic Association have been 
elected as follows: Pres., W. B. Harper; sec. and 
treas., H.J. Armstrong. 

— We were pleased to see three professors on the 
campus one afternoon to coach the foot-ball team. 
Let the good work go on. 

— The Senior class in English will briefly master 
the principles of logic before proceeding with 
debates in the class-room. 

— R. A. Cooley, '95, has been appointed Assistant 
Entomologist at the Hatch Experiment Station to fill 
the vacancy left by the resignation of C.P. Lounsbury, 
'94. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The horticultural department was represented at 
the Bay State fair in Worcester by a large and excel- 
lent collection of fruits and vegetables. 

— On Monday, June 12, the old creamery owned 
by Prof. Warner was almost entirely destroyed by fire. 
The loss was fully covered by insurance. 

— The college library has lately been increased by 
"The Annals de la Society de Entomology de la 
France," in volumes running back for fifty years. 

— The freshmen and 1st Year men have challenged 
the Sophomores and 2d Year men to a game of foot- 
ball, but the challenge has not, as yet, been accepted. 

— Before the base-ball team disbanded last com- 
mencement the following officers were elected for this 
year: Captain, J. L. Marshall, '96; manager, N. 
Shultis, '96. 

— The officers of the Reading Room Association 
have been elected as follows : Pres., F. E. de Luce, 
'96; vice-pres., H. H. Roper, '96; treas., J. M.Barry, 
'97 ; sec, L. F. Clark, '97. 

— Prof. J. B. Paige has been granted leave of ab- 
sence for one year to study Veterinary in Germany. 
E. H. Lehnert, '93, Magill University, '95, has been 
engaged during the absence of Prof. Paige. 

— The '97 Index Board are working hard to keep 
up the good reputation of our college annual and their 
efforts are sure to be successful. They expect to put 
the publication on sale by the middle of December. 

— The Baron Herman, Attache' Extraordinaire to 
the German Embassy at Washington was at college 
Tuesday, Sept. 3, to investigate the methods and 
results of the agricultural department of the college. 

— At the business meeting of the Chess club, the 
following officers were elected : Pres., Fred B. Shaw ; 
vice-pres., Henry W. Moore ; sec, John A. Emrich : 
treas., John M. Barry; directors, W. Q. Kinsman and 
officers ex officio. 

— The vacancy at the Plant House left by the 
resignation of W. M. Shepardson, '88, has been filled 
by J. H. Putnam, '94, who is now superintendent of 
the horticultural department of the college, and assis- 
tant horticulturist at the Hatch Experiment Station. 
E. A. White, '95, has filled the position formerly oc- 
cupied by R. F. Pomeroy, '94, as florist at the Plant 
House. 



— Dr. Lindsey and E. B. Holland, '92, of the Ex- 
periment Station, presented a paper before the society 
for Promoting Agricultural Science held at Spring- 
field, the subject being "Digestibility of Pentosants-" 

— The Two Years Class, '97, have elected the fol- 
lowing officers for the term: Pres., A. S. March ; 
vice-pres., J. B. Isharn ; sec, E. K. Perry; treas., C 
E. Stacy; class captain, J. C. Burrington ; sergeant 
at arms, C. A. Blair ; historian, E. K. Perry. 

— C. A. Nutting, '96, has retired from the active 
duties of mercantile life, leaving Allen Bros, a clear 
field. They have opened a new mammoth establish- 
ment in the old Q. T. V. rooms and any students in 
need of supplies will find there a ready welcome. 
Terms cash. 

— The annual fair of the Hampshire Agricultural 
Society will he beld at Hampshire park on Tuesday 
and Wednesday, Sept. 24 and 25. Following the 
usual custom, probably all college exercises will be 
suspended on Wednesday to allow all students who 
wish to visit the fair. 

The Two Years class, '96, have elected the follow- 
ing officers : Pres., E. W. Capen ; vice-pres., F. E. 
Barrett; sec, R. P. Coleman; treas., L. E. Lincoln; 
class captain, J. A. Davis; historian, E. W. Capen; 
sergeant at arms, L. R. Alexander ; reading room 
director, F. E. Barrett. 

— Officers of the Freshman class are as follows : 
Pres., J. R. Dutcher; vice-pres., E.M.Wright; sec, 
C. M. Walker; treas., W. A. Hooker; historian, F. 
H. Turner; class captain, D. A. Beaman ; foot-ball 
captain, A. D. Gile ; foot-ball director, J.R. Dutcher; 
rope-pull captain, A. D. Gile. 

— The Y. M. C. A. has held very interesting 
meetings thus far this term. Prof. Walker took 
charge of the service Thursday evening Sept 8th. and 
gave a very interesing talk upon religion and its appli- 
cation to the every day duties of college life. It is 
earnestly hoped that the incoming classes will 
consider it both their duty and their privilege to unite 
with this organization which has accomplished so much 
in the past and which is sure to exert a power for 
good over the hearts and lives of its members. The 
Sunday evening service has been changed from 4-45 
to 4 o'clock, that being a more convenient hour for 
all. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The officers of the Boarding Club are as follows : 
Pres. and manager, P. A. Leamy, '96 ; vice-pres.,W. 
L. Pentecost, '96; sec. and treas., J, L. Marshall, 
'96; directors, C. A. King, '97, J. L. Bartlett, '97, 
R. D. Warden, '98, and F.E.Barrett, 2d Year. There 
are now eighty-five men at the Boarding Club. 

— It is proposed to make the two year's course of 
greater practical value to the majority of its members 
by dropping mathematics in the fall term of the second 
year, and substituting Political Economy and Veterin- 
ary for the remainder of the year. This is certainly 
a desirable change and it will be highly appreciated by 
the students in the two year's course. 

— Those who may think that the students do not 
appreciate the advantages of the college course and 
take no interest in its welfare, would have been sur- 
prised could they have been at the Plant House last 
Wednesday afternoon and evening. The number of 
students who solicitously examined the extent of 
damages by the recent storm in the vineyard and 
peach orchard, was very gratifying. 

— The officers of the Sophomore class are as fol- 
lows : Pres., R. D. Warden ; vice-pres., A. Mont- 
gomery; sec. and treas., C. A. Baxter.; class captain, 
W.Q. Kinsman; historian, J. P. Nickerson; foot-ball 
captain, J. H. Wright; reading room director, A. 
Montgomery; tennis, J. S. Eaton; base-ball captain, 
R. D. Warden; polo captain, T. H. Charmbury; ser- 
geant-at-arms, W. Q. Kinsman ; athlectic director, J. 
J. Eaton. 

— The following men from the Freshmen and 1st 
Year classes have become members of the various 
college fraternities : Q. T. V., G. F. Keenan, C. W. 
Smith, D. A. Beaman, H. P. Dickinson; Phi Sigma 
Kappa, W. A. Hooker, E. M. Wright, A. A. Boutelle ; 
D. C. K., J. D. Canto, C. Sastre, J. W. Dutcher, A. 
B. Ashley; College Shakespearean Club, F. H. Turner, 
S. E. Smith, C. M. Walker, H. E. Maynard, J. B. 
Isham, B. H. Smith. 

— Following are the Junior class officers: Pres., G. 
D. Leavens; vice-pres., L. F. Clark; sec, G. A. 
Drew; treas., C. A. Peters; class captain, F. W. 
Barclay ; historian, J. A. Emrich ; sergeant-at-arms, 
J. W. Allen; foot-ball captain, F. W. Barclay; base- 
ball captain, J. A. Emrich ; polo captain, J. A. Em- 
rich ; reading room directors.J. M. Barry, L. F. Clark; 



foot-ball, C. A. King, J. R. Eddy; base-ball, J. A. 
Emrich, C. I. Goessmann ; polo, j. R. Eddy, J. A. 
Emrich. 

— The Senior class has elected the following offi- 
cers for the term : Pres., J. L. Marshall ; vice-pres., 
A. S. Kinney; treas., H. T. Edwards; sec, H. H. 
Roper; sergeant-at-arms, I. C. Poole; class captain, 
P. A. Leamy; foot-ball captain, A.M.Kramer; base- 
ball captain, G. Tsuda ; polo captain, H. W. Moore; 
reading room directors, H. H. Roper, F. E. de Luce; 
foot-ball, H. C. Burrington, J. L. Marshall ; base-ball; 
P. A. Leamy, F. H. Read; polo, M. E. Sellew, H. 
T. Edwards. 

— The consolidation of the two experiment stations 
has been permanently effected, and the following de- 
partments established : Fertilizers, Dr. Goessmann ; 
entomology, Prof. Fernald ; agriculture, Prof. Brooks ; 
horticulture. Prof. Maynard ; botany, Prof. Stone ; 
veterinary, Dr. Paige ; meteorology, Prof. Metcalf . 
Prof. Stone has moved into the east brick building of 
the station and will use it wholly for his department.' 
The barn of the former Hatch station will be fitted for 
feeding experiments with cattle, sheep and swine, under 
the direction of Dr. Lindsey. G. A. Billings, '95, will 
assist Dr. Lindsey in his work. 

— On Saturday, August 31 , a delegation of about 
two hundred and fifty ladies and gentleman from the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science 
arrived from Springfield and proceeded to investigate 
the methods and results in the various departments of 
the college. Special attention was given to the Plant 
House and Insectary, although other departments were 
visited by many. The members of the Association 
expressed themselves as well pleased with the general 
excellence of the college equipment and may be de- 
pended upon to recommend the institution to anyone 
wishing for a good scientific education. 

— On Friday evening, Sept. 13, the college Y. M. 
C. A. tendered a reception to the incoming classes, 
for the purpose of becoming better acquainted with 
the new men and of extending to them the fellowship 
of the organization. The chapel was tastefully deco- 
rated with flowers and plants from the green-house and 
refreshments were served by members of the commit- 
tee. Students and faculty alike strove to make the 
occasion pleasant to all, and their efforts were well 



AGGIE LIFE. 



rewarded. These receptions serve the double purpose 
of making the students better acquainted with each 
other and of bringing them into closer union and sym- 
pathy with the faculty. 

— There is every prospect for a fine foot-ball team 
this fall. With over forty candidates for the team 
there is sure to be some lively competition and hard 
work, two important elements of success in the game. 
Perhaps the next in importance is the financial support 
of the team. This is for you to give, and upon your gen- 
erosity depends the success or failure of the season. 
No matter how proficient the team, without adequate 
support it can do nothing. Let every man put his 
hands down deep in his pockets and draw forth a few 
dollars from the summer's earnings. It can be put to 
no better use than in supporting the reputation and ad- 
vancing the interests of old Aggie. 

— At a mass meeting of the college Friday evening, 
Sept. 6, the following business was transacted. Reports 
from the secretaries of the various associations v/ere 
read and accepted. Voted to levy a tax of $1.00 upon 
the college for the support of the reading room. A 
report from the committee on a college pin was ac- 
cepted. Voted that the sample pin costing $2.00 be 
adopted as a college pin and that orders be received 
for it by the presidents of the various classes. The 
pin is a fac-simile of the State seal, with a maroon 
band running obliquely across on which are the letters 
M. A. C. in gold. Alumni who wish to procure pins 
can send their names to P. A. Leamy, Chairman of 
the Committee. 

— The Glee and Banjo clubs have united under the 
name of the "Amherst Mass. State College Glee and 
Banjo Clubs, " and propose to make the coming season 
reflect creditably upon the musical talent of the college. 
The officers and members of the club are as follows : 
Leader of Glee club and assistant leader of Banjo 
club, F. E. DeLuce ; manager, C. A. Norton. Glee 
Club: 1st tenor, F. E. Barrett, J. A. Emrich, W. S. 
Fisher; 2d tenor, G. D. Leavens, B. M.Wright; 1st 
bass, F. B. Shaw; 2d base, F. E. DeLuce, C. A. 
Norton. Banjo club: Leader, J. D. Canto; banjeau- 
rines, J. D. Canto, F. E. Barrett, F. B. Shaw, C. A. 
Peters ; 1st banjo, C. I. Goessmann ; 2d banjo, C. A. 
Norton, N. Shultis; guitar, C. Sastre ; mandolin, Y. 
H. Canto. Prof. Bigelow of Amherst college will 



train the Glee club, and Lombard, Amherst '96, will 
instruct the Banjo club. The enthusiasm and enter- 
prise which the men show in their work is very com- 
mendable and cannot fail to make the season one of 
the most successful in the history of the college. 

— On Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 11th., the 
college was visited by a terrific thunder and hail storm 
which swept over the entire farm, uprooting trees, 
washing out road beds, smashing glass and destroying 
crops. Inside of twenty minutes, 1 .33 inches of rain 
fell while the wind reached a velocity 91.6 miles an 
hour, the highest recorded velocity in the history of 
the meteorological station. Hailstones fell measuring 
1.8 inches in diameter and 3 inches in circumferance. 
The greatest damage was done at the Plant House 
where the loss is variously estimated at from $1000 to 
$1500. Glass in all the greenhouses was broken in 
many places and it will require an immense amount 
of labor to repair the damage. Peaches, grapes, 
apples were all so severly injured by the hail that the 
crops will hardly fetch a third of the expected proceeds. 
But the college is not alone in its affliction, all over 
the town the effects of the storm are seen in uprooted 
trees, washed out roads and ruined crops. A storm 
like this occurs but once in a life time, for which we 
should be sincerely thankful, 



A SONG. 
A maiden passed and as she went 
She played upon an instrument 
And sang a song so sweetly blent 
With melody divine — 
That 'long her path the willows bowed 
Their heads still lower and the crowd 
Of flowers wild that kissed her feet 
Gave forth a sweeter scent. 

— M. in Univ. Cynic. 



BEYOND. 
I know not how nor when nor where, 

But some day in the dim, deep future, there 
We shall meet. 

Hand clasped in hand and heart to heart, 
Eye to eye, and clearer then, for wide apart 
The veil of sense is rent. 

A sleep, a dream, a good-night's parting word, 
A night-watch as we cross the ford, 
Then — Ah ! Grim death grows sweet. 

—P. M. In Brunonian. 



AGGIE LiFE. 



©■fees &r\d ^©mmervfcs. 



Another International Yachting contest over and 
this time we had not the satisfaction of inflicting our 
usual number of defeats upon the Englishman. Of 
course the cup stays upon American soil as it is 
eminently proper it should do, at least until a chal- 
lenger presents himself wjio will not, for such trivial 
reasons as those given by Lord Dunraven, refuse to 
sail the races of the series as prescribed, but from the 
point of view of good fellowship and feeling with our 
English cousins, there is much to be regretted about 
the deplorable manner in which the contest was 
finished. 

As Americans we have of course much to be 
thankful for. The superiority of the American sailor 
in building and sailing this most wonderful of racing 
craft has been again demonstrated beyond a doubt. 
In the one satisfactory race of the series the Defender 
gave her adversaries such a drubbing as must have 
recalled to their minds the days of the Mayflower and 
Volunteer. She afterward showed her ability to sail in 
a crippled condition and covered herself with glory. Our 
joy at these results is not to be compared to what we 
should have felt had we seen her sailing home a win- 
ner in three out of five fair and well contested races, 
as we may rest assured she would have done had not 
unforseen circumstances arisen to prevent. 

We may also rejoice at the action of the N. Y. 
Yacht club in offering to resail the disputed second 
race. After thus doing all in their power to promote 
the best of feeling between the contestants, we can 
but wonder at the action of Lord Dunraven in with- 
drawing the Valkyrie at a moment when it must lead 
to so much unfavorable comment and possibly to an 
end of the friendly meetings upon the water, which 
have been so desirable a feature of the sporting world 
since the America brought home the Queen's cup in 
1870. 



MUSIC. 
When, as the day grows dim, 

Soft music steals on the enchanted air. 
The wild bird on the swaying limb, 

Or instrumental tones, or human voices dear, 
They are but breathings from a higher sphere, 
Bringing a few faint notes of the eternal hymn. 

— Rix, in Brunonian. 



SCHEDULE. 

FALL TERM. 



GENERAL EXERCISES. 



A. M. 

8-00- 
8-30- 



A. M. 

8-15- 



10-15 
11-15 

1-15- 



-Chapel. 

Inspection of rooms, Sat. 



10-30 A. m— Church. Sunday. 
4-45 p. m— Drill, M., T., Th. 



CLASS EXERCISES. 

Four Years' Course. 



2-15—1 
3-15- 

8-15- 
9-15- 
10-15 

1 1-15 



ph English F. 

i Entomology M. T. W. Th. 

c2 Chemistry M. T. W. Th. 
i Entomology M. T. W. Th. 

c2 Chem. M. T. W. Th. 

d Military Science F. 
—a Agriculture 

m Mathematics* 
— z Pol. Econ. 

m Engineering* 

c Chemistry W. Th. F. 
b Botany M. T. Th. F. 

b Horticulture M. T. Th. F. 

ph German W. 

z Veterinary T. W. 
b Botany M. T. Th. F. 



z Veterinary M. Th. F. 
ph German M. Th. F. 
ph English T. 

SOPHOMORE. 

m Mathematics M. Th. F 

p English T. W. 
■p French M. T. W. Th. 

c Chemistry F. 
— ph Agriculture M. T. 

b Botany W. F. 

c Chemistry Th. 
- c Chemistry M. T. 

b Botany W. F. 

ph Agriculture Th. 
ph Agriculture F. 

SECOND YEAR. 

8-15 — z Zoology 

9- I 5— c Chemistry M. T. W. 

b Gardening Th. 
10-15— b Gardening M. T. Th. 

p English W. 

1 1 - 1 5— p English M.T. 

d Mathematics W. Th. 1 
1 - 1 5— a Agriculture M. T. Th. 
2-15— 
3-15— 



1-15— 
31-5 



a Agriculture M. Th. F. 
m Physics T. W. 

z Zoology M. T. W. Th. 



z Zoology M. T. W. Th. 
ph English M. W. F. 

cl Chemistry M. T. Th. 



cl Chemistry M. Th. 

Gardening T. 

b Gardening M. T. 



FRESHMAN. 

b Botany 

ph Latin M. T. W. Th. 

d Mathematics 



d Book-keeping M. T. 
p English Th. F. 



d Tactics T. 

FIRST YEAR. 

d Mathematics M. T. W. 
b Botany M. T. W. 
a Agriculture Th. F. 
p English M. T. Th. 
ph Agriculture W. 
zl Drawing F. 
a Agriculture M. T. 
zl Drawing F. 



zl Drawing M. Th. 

d Tactics T. 

zl Drawing M. Th. 
ROOMS:— a Agriculture, b Botany, bg Eotan. Garden, bl Botan. Lab. c 
Chemistry, cl First Chem. Lab. c2 Second Chem. Lab. ch Chapel, d Drill 
Hall, e East Chapel, i Insectary. 1 Library, m Mathematics, p President's, 
ph Philosophy, pi Physical Laboratory, t Tower, w West Chapel, z Zoology, 
zl Zoological Laboratory. *As directed. 



The editor, with gladsome cry, 
Exclaims, "My work is done.' 

The manager, with weary sigh, 
Complains, "My work is dun.' 



-College Life, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE GUARDIAN ANGELS OF THE SUMMER 
TIME. 

Well, we're back again, back on the same old ground. 
With only a few new ratholes and papers scattered round. 
Our lounge is shy another leg, the mirror has a crack, 
But is not as bad as last year on the first day we were back. 

Our first day back and everything so splendidly upset ; 
We haven't room to lie or sit or even stand as yet. 
How ever did the folks that cleaned this dormitory out 
Get things I left so orderly all scattered round about. 

I'm sure I left the books arranged upon their proper shelves; 
Don't tell me they got all mixed up in this way by themselves, 
It's funny how I came to leave three hats upon that rack 
And how I came to look in vain for one when I got back. 

Well, it's always just the same old way when the long 

vacation's on ; 
They clean our rooms and fix them up because the crowd is 

gone. 
It looks as though it had been cleaned by the streaks upon 

the wall 
But it's not as bad as usual for the first day after all. 



Ivssrms 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

During the summer a number of volumes on the 
subjects of Civil and Sanitary Engineering have been 
added to the Library. 

Illustrations of British Fungi, (Hymenomycetes) , by 
M. C. Cooke. This work is in nine volumes, of which 
eight consist principally of illustrative plates while the 
ninth contains descriptive matter. They are intended 
to serve as an atlas to the "Handbook of British 
Fungi." 

Annals of the Entomological Society of France. 
From 1856 to 1896. 

Wanderings in South America. Charles Waterton. 
This book is written by a lover of Nature, who 
describes with untiring zeal and interest the barbarous 
countries which he visited. He tells about the blow- 
pipe and the wourali poisoned arrows used by the 
natives in their peculiar mode of hunting. As a 
preface, a review of the wanderings is given by Sidney 
Smith, and altogether it is an interesting, classically 
written volume. 

Two Voyages to New England and Rarities of New 
England. By John Josselyn. These two celebrated 
books were first published by the author in 1672 and 
1674 and the present editions are as near as possible 
Fac-similes of the original ones. They are valuable 
as literary curiosities and are frequently referred to, 
being among the the earliest works on the Botany and 
Natural History of New England, 



'86. — The engagement is announced of R.B. Mack- 
intosh of Peabody to Miss Elizabeth Lord of Peabody. 

'94. — F. G. Averell was in town a few days ago. 

'94. — C. P. Lounsbury has arrived at his new home 
in South Africa. 

'95.— G. A. Billings, Box 710, Amherst, Mass., Asst. 
in the Department of Foods and Cattle Feeding at the 
Hatch Experiment Station. 

'95. — R. A. Cooley, Amherst, Mass., Asst. Ento- 
mologist, Hatch Experiment Station. 

'95.— C. M. Dickinson, 68 Lake St., Chicago, 111., 
with E. H. Hunt, florist. 

'95. — A. B. Smith, care L. D. Hammond, 177 La 
Salle St., Chicago, 111., with Hammond, Fry & Shel- 
don, insurance agents. 

'95.— E. A. White, Asst. Florist, M. A. C. 

'95.— H. B. Read, Westford, Mass. 

'95.— W. A. Root, Deerfield, Mass. 

'95. — C. B. Lane, Asst. Agriculturist, Storrs Agri- 
cultural School. 



Some one said that "this is pre-eminently an age of 
specialists." It is a rare thing to find a symmetrically 
developed student. But it is not an uncommon thing 
to find one who is almost a marvel in some certain 
line ; yet in this same one it is not a very surprising 
thing to find that there is a most conspicuous weakness 
as well. The cultivation of one particular habit to the 
neglect of others must of necessity produce narrow- 
ness and weakness somewhere. While each one should 
strive to be in a reasonable measure proficient in some 
i special line, the importance of a good, well balanced 
foundation cannot be too forcibly urged before the 
specialty is undertaken. The one who decides early 
in life to be a preacher, a doctor, or a lawyer, may 
1 find to his bitter disapointment that his "calling" is of 
I such character as to call him to the shovel, the shop, 
! or the sod. Certainly the moderately strong man that 
j is well balanced is a more desirable citizen than one 
who is very strong in but one line. The latter is bound 
to war — turn in whichever direction you may. — Earl- 
hamite. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



OUGHT THE UNITED STATES MAINTAIN A 
LARGE NA VYP 

Does the United States need a large fleet in order 
to defend herself ? Defend herself I say, since it is 
the policy of the U. S. not to interfere with other 
nations, except when they violate some international 
law, or encroach on her domains. Unlike most other 
large powers she has no colonies scattered over the 
globe and looking to her for protection ; she has no 
alliances with foreign governments, and no desire for 
foreign military conquests. Still her interests are 
everywhere and must be cared for. 

Let us consider the cost of the British navy, at 
present the most powerful navy in existence. The 
following figures are from Lord Brasseys' Naval 
Annual for 1892: First cost of existing navy, $304,- 
067,550. Annual expenditure since 1870 to keep 
the fleet in serviceable condition, $10,315,545. 
Annual expense for effective service, half pay, pen- 
sions, colonial services, etc., $71,201,000. Thus her 
command of the seas has cost England an original 
outlay of $300,000,000 and an annual expenditure of 
$80,000,000 ; but England must maintain her supre- 
macy at any cost. 

With the United States the case is entirely differ- 
ent ; we do not wish command of the sea ; it is not a 
national necessity with us as it is with England. It is 
true that we are a large nation and must have repre- 
sentation abroad ; our coast line is very long and must 
be defended. Although we have an enormous coast- 
wise commerce, nearly all our foreign traffic is car- 
ried in the ships of other nations. Hence we have 
only a small commercial marine to protect. The 
United States is independent of the rest of the world 
in respect to all supplies, and no blockade of our 
ports could force us to surrender. 

Therefore, we need a small fleet in foreign waters 
to maintain our national dignity, and afford protection 
to our interests. At home our four thousand five 
hundred miles of sea coast must have adequate de- 
fense. Upon this long stretch of coast are thirty 
ports demanding protection ; of these, twelve are so 
important as centers of commercial v/ealth that the 
country has much at stake in their security. Now, 
shall these ports be protected by forts, land batteries, 
mines and torpedo boats, or by war-ships ? 

Experience gained through the Civil War has 



taught us the proper policy to be observed when a 
navy larger than our own is operating on our coast_ 
The plan of stationing a few coast defense vessels in 
our chief ports in place of permanent fortifications 
would not only offer too little protection, but would 
also permit a blockade of the coast, thus failing in the 
very point in which it ought to be strong. If instead 
of our fleet being scattered, a few in each port, it was 
concentrated it might become aggressive. Although 
England has been mistress of the seas for many years 
it was only about thirty-five years ago that the sub- 
ject of coast defense was seriously discussed ; about 
1 860 coast fortifications were begun, involving an out- 
lay of $50,000,000. These defenses have been 
maintained up to the present time and are a part of 
the war policy of the present government. 

What advantages have land fortifications and bat- 
teries over war vessels as means of harbor defense ? 

First, cheapness. In 1885 a joint board of army 
and navy officers were appointed to " examine and 
report at what ports, fortifications, or other defenses 
are most urgently required, the character and kind of 
defenses best adapted for each with reference to arma- 
ment " and " the utilization of torpedoes, mines or 
other defensive apparatus." This board estimated 
that $130,000,000 judiciously expended would place 
the coast in a condition of security, even if operated 
against by the largest naval means that could be 
brought against it. The cost of maintaining land 
works is trifling compared with the maintenance of 
steel battle ships. It is a fallacy that the life of a 
steel vessel is longer than that of a wooden one ; it is 
much shorter. Corrosion has already made serious 
inroads on our new navy. A gun mounted on land 
costs from one third to one fifth as much as the 
same gun on ship board. 

A small annual outlay would keep these land 
defences in serviceable condition, while as has been 
stated, England spends annually $80,000,000 to keep 
up her navy. 

Second, permanence. These fortifications are per- 
manent ; the life of a vessel is uncertain. 

Third, increased effectiveness and range. There is 
continual development going on in the construction of 
battleships. Much less weight in armor and arma- 
ment is now used than formerly. One hundred and 
ten ton guns are replaced by those weighing sixty-seven 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ii 



tons, and carrying a smaller projectile with increased 
velocity. 

These developments have all resulted from the 
desire of increasing the efficiency of ships of war in 
their contests with each other, and not with a view of 
contending with forts ; thus the curved fire of the old 
guns was more dreaded by land batteries than the 
flatter trajectories resulting from increased velocity. 
Close range is necessary in order to bring the second- 
ary armament into action, and of course as greater 
precision of fire is obtained by stable than by movable 
platforms, the advantage is all with land guns. 

A more perfect cover is also afforded the men on 
land. 

It has seemed best to reduce gun calibre on ship 
board, but that is no reason the same should be done 
on land. The enemy knowing that we have much 
heavier guns will fight at such range that his second- 
ary armament will be useless ; again the advantage is 
with the shore guns. For high angled fire guns the 
Navy Department has adopted a single calibre, twelve 
inches. This large calibre will allow weight enough to 
the projectile to insure deck penetration, and capacity 
for large charges of high explosives. This mortar 
may be used with a range of five miles with great pre- 
cision. In the modern ship the protective deck is 
placed below the water line, and is covered by a 
wooden deck, the secondary armament being between 
the two. A shell from a twelve inch mortar would 
penetrate both decks and act among the boilers and 
magazines. In short, battle ships are constructed with 
a view of fighting each other, and are at a disadvan- 
tage when compelled to contend with a much heavier 
armament placed on shore. Our harbors should also 
be defended by submarine mines, torpedo boats, etc. 

Provide our ports with these" defenses and no fleet 
however large could destroy them ; maintain a small 
fleet in foreign waters to represent our country, and 
protect our interests, and I think the United States 
will have done all that prudence and safety require 
of her. x. y. z. 



Esrha^es. 



The only woman chemist in Paris is a Vassar girl, 
Miss Ida Welt. She has distinguished herself at the 
University of Geneva and at the University of Paris. 
The Academy of Sciences has just published her 
"Researches on Dissymmetrical Hydocarbons, 



-In Bmnonian. 



EMBLEMS OF GOD'S LOVE. 
To the flowers of Spring, 

Which gladden hill and lea, 
I tune my heart to sing, 

For in these gifts I see 
The God of all. 

Who thro' them talks to me 

Of trust and purity. 

Arrayed in priceless dress, 

They neither toil nor weave, 
But silently express 

The great love they receive 
From God above 

Who urges us to be 

Like them in purity. 

NO SECRET. 
In the realm of College lore, 
Whether recent or of yore, 

'Tisn't hard to find 
What it is that hov'ring near 
Turns the student into seer, 

Fires the latent mind. 

As, through flower bud waiting ready. 
Heart-life throbbing, pulses steady, 

Shoots the magic gleam. 
When from Phobus' silvered crest 
Leaping down at love's behest 

Comes the quick'ning beam. 

So, when finds its power to grasp, 
Opes the mind its secret clasp, 

Siezes wisdom's gold-; 
Roused by live thoughts into bloom, 
Breathes it forth a sweet perfume — 

Treasures new and old. 

Would you, would you know the name 
Of this breath that fans a flame 

Mounting up so high? 
'Tis the genius of endeavor 
Like a mighty mystic lever 

Lifting toward the sky. 

— College Life. 
SONG. 
O Death, 1 never have feared thee, 
But little did I know 
That I, ere close of the summer. 
Should learn to love thee so. 

For gladness came in the spring time 
And wooed me for life with glee. 
But she is gone with the roses 
And sorrow hath wooed for thee. 

— Q. E. D. in Univ. Cynic. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Mrs C. — "Do you believe that cures can be effected 
by the laying on of hands?" 

Mrs. A. — "Certainly. 1 cured my boy of smoking in 
that way." 

There are 1 18 graduates of Oberlin College in active 
missionary work in foreign fields. Scarcely a mission 
of the American Board is without a representative. 

"Tohoku Gakinu" is the name of a college in Japan, 
which was established in 1886. Its sole endowment 
then was a Japanese widow's mite, twelve pieces of 
silver. Now the faculty numbers 20 and the students 
188. 

LIFE AND DEATH. 
Dost thou behold that stream 

Its farther shore is wrapt as in a shroud ; 

The Stygian flood rolls silent as a cloud. 

The path along the shore 
Now underneath an azure sky doth run, 
Now darkness drear, as shadows veil the sun. 

That road thou still must tread : 
Sometimes thro' smiling meadows, verdure light, 
'Mid wind-blown daisies, sun-kissed poppies bright. 

But other whiles thy way 
Thro' barren brakes and deserts drear doth lie 
Where Summer's blossoms droop their heads and die, 

One day, ere thou dost know, 
Across thy path that inky flood will roll, 
And, inward plunging, thou must seek the farther goal. 

— P. M., in Biiinonian. 

THE COMING OF SONG. 
(Paraphrased from the Servian of Zmai Iovan Iovanovich, 
after liberal translation by Nikola Tesla.) 
When the sky darkened on the first great sin, 
And gates that shut man out shut Hope within, 
Like to the falcon when his wing is broke, 
The bitter cry of mortals then awoke : 
"Too heavy is our burden," groaned the two. 
"Shall woes forever on our track pursue, 
And nest within these empty hearts ? Or, worse, 
Shall we be withered by the cruel curse ? 
Already less than human, shall we fall 
By slow succession to some animal?" 

Then, filled with pity at the desperate cry, 

Came from his throne of thunder the Most High : 

"That you should suffer" (spake the Voice) "is just : 

'T is you have chosen for a feast a crust. 

But not so unrelenting 1 — the least 

Of all your kind shall be above the beast. 

That erring mortals be not lost in fear, 

Come from my shining courts, daughter dear ! 



Thou dost to heaven, shalt to earth belong." 
She came ; she stayed : it was the Muse of Song. 

Again the day was radiant with light, 

And something more than stars illumined the night. 

Hope, beckoning, to the desert took its flight. 

Where is Pain and dire Distress, 
Song shall sooth like soft caress ; 
Though the stoutest courage fails. 
Song's an anchor in all gales ; 
When all others fail to reach, 
Song shall be the thrilling speech ; 
Love and friends and comfort fled, 
Song shall linger by your bed ; 
And when doubt shall question, Why? 
Song shall lift you to the sky. 
— Robert Underwood Johnson, in Earlhamite. 

MY SWEETHEART. 
Oh. you whose sweethearts die, 
And being dead are soon forgot ; 
Ye little know how hard my lot, 
Pass by ; pass by. 

Go weep your ladies dead ; 
Although ye loved them passing well, 
Ye had your solace, as ye tell, 
When ye were wed. 

May made them glorious ; 
.Gay Autumn gave them golden sheaves 
Of corn and fair red fruit and leaves ; 
Ye were blest thus. 

What if they passed away 
In Winter, when all joy is done ; 
Shall ye not count your heaven won 
That Summer's day. 

Nay, lovers, pity me ; 
I have such long years loved in vain ; 
My sweetheart, howsoever fain, 
I may not see. 

My lady is Dame Death, 
Whom I have chosen long ago ; 
Yet though she goeth to and fro 
And bateth breath. 

She will not heed my word 
Nor hearken how I long for her, 
Her truer, worthier worshipper 
Through hope deferred. 

And yet my heart's request 
Is but to see her and so die, 
Nay breathe her breath as she goes by 
And be at rest. 

— Idtesse In Univ. Cynic. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



13 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
1 1-30 A. M. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Satanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. u. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 a.m. 
to 12 M., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 P. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 P. M. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. M. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 



WHICH WA Y DO YOU GO HOME! 

Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware. Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. M. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 



For Worcester 6.09. 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. M. Sunday at 
6.10 a. m. 

Returning leave Worcester at 1 1.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 A. M., and 2.34 p. M. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25. 4.45, 5.14. 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30. 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays. 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 8.01. 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m.. 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20. 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 1 1.46 a. m., 8.42 p. a. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. M. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



SHEET 

■ AND 



MUSIC BOOKS. 
STRINGS FOB VIOLIN, BANJO AND G 



Cusf\Hiarfs Ausic $fore, 



SOIlTHAMl'TON. 



Merchant Tailor 

Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



1850. 



■GO TO- 



1895. 



VEILS PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDI 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and G?oup Iflork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



«j, L,. LJ 



E. K, BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



FIKST DOOR FROM POST OFFICE. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



M 



AGGIE LIFE. 



m^MSESSB^^^l^^ 



¥i-z ^&wz^^g szasgaBg 3r&z%:~.gm$. %~s^ws-% -\ 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 






NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 

AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLLARS & CUFFS. 



FINE NECKWEAR. 



msMzi mm i^mMncms^mmmsm^MggmssmimExmmis&m, 



Buy the Latest Farm Machinery and Hake Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



Write j or 

Circulars 




110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm, 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and planting the same, free on application. 



■Q. 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on band. 

F ERD. FANEUF. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



(Hassaehuserts Agricultural College. 



AT THE 



WE HAVE PUKE BRED 



outiidown Sib 



j 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amhekst, Mass. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & II. and ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.50. 
For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

0. G. COUCH & SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



L 



THOMIB 0. 23 ILL ON, 

DEALER EN 

Hard and Free Burning Coals 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 
ggp-Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. «,^ 

RESIDENCE SOUTH PROSPECT ST. 



I. 191. 



ill 



ILAIN, 



Uvery ar\d Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX EOW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IKTTIBIBZEIK O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JS^Jiepniring done while you tvait.J&r 
2 VMOSN1X MOV.'. 



DICKINSON I GOER™, 

BOARDING 

Livery, Feel and Exchange Stable 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEtGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

ooksBlier, sutiemr aid Mmm. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 



razors honed, barbers supplies for sale. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



'9 



:f:e3:.£>.:e ; i^la.c;ist. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles 
Sunday and night call > responded to at residence, first door 
"west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

* Co-Operative Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agei:».t, C TE^. jF»^%.X-,a.IS3IS 'O?, 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S^iaATISFACTION GU ARANTEBD. sS 2 

OFFICE : 

Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge lo and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



S^SPECIAL RATES.,^3§ 

PasseDger to center, ------ ioc. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c. 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



e 
8-K 



aty of oi clones 
l we are Pleasefl to See. 



■■n 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



5 9v p 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 



They make a specialty of 



GENT'S fflERiO UNDERWEAR. 



There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



loiers, Tailors, flatters, Finlslp. 



B. W. BLDBEJETT & CD., 

Merchant Tailors 

AND DEALERS IN 

READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^"•Repairing neatly done at short notice. .»®3 



Ebq. W. Bladgett & Ga. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



FOUNTAIN IMSroS^. 

Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



^Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, &c> 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE OOSff^^O^lONJ^HTST, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium, 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 2, 1895. 



NO. 



E* L I f J 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

F. P. WASHBURN, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97. Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY. '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN. '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to ail subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



ECdi'tori&ls. 



With the beginning of the new year the editors 
once more begin their work and take up pen and 
wrack their brains for new thoughts and ideas. Then 
it is that the managers must begin to hustle and to 
look around for the dollars and cents that are 
going to pay for the paper. The paper is not, 
as some may be led to think, a means of putting 
money in the editors' pockets ; indeed it is far more 
liable at the present time to require them to support 
it. Now why is this? Is not the paper a success? 
Certainly it is a success in many ways if we may 
judge from the testimonials we receive and from what 
we individually hear about it, but it is not a success 
financially and all because a considerable per cent, of 
the alumni subscribers do not pay their subscriptions 
promptly but allow them to run from year to year. Is 
this done willfully? We should be loathe to think 



that such were the case. Rather let us think it 
a matter of carelessness or oversight on the part of 
the subscriber and that when it is once brought to his 
notice he will awake to his duty and not put off till to- 
morrow what he should do to-day. If this is done 
there will be a great burden lifted from the manager's 
shoulders and the success of the paper will be 
assured. This is not intended to apply to all the 
alumni subscribers for some of them are very prompt 
and we thank them for it. Would that they were all 
like these. 



With the re-organization of the W. I. L. S. should 
begin a new epoch in the literary and forensic history 
of the College. This is the only organization of the 
kind in the institution and for that reason should re- 
ceive the unfaltering support of every man here. 
Under the new management meetings v/ill probably be 
held every other Friday evening, for a while, at least, 
and later, perhaps every week. Most students know 
the object of this society, viz. : To give its members 
opportunity for debate, extemporaneous speaking, 
essay writing, declamation and reading, — exercises 
which, as a scientific school, we are forced to largely 
neglect, in our prescribed course, to our manifest dis- 
advantage. You may laugh at the idea now, but in 
after life you may see the great benefit such practice 
as you will be able to get at the W. I. L. S. meetings 
will be to you. To be able to stand on one's feet and 
express one's ideas in plain, forcible and convincing 
language, is worth all the trouble and exertion it will 
cost to attain such ability. A man with such ability 
is a power and moving factor in any assembly where 
he may be found. All of us want to be found among 
the prime factors in the near future. Let us, then, 
one and all, for the benefit to ourselves and to our 
neighbors, come out and do our best to secure this 
end, working through the W. I. L. S. 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



There are two ways in which we may use the 
privileges that are afforded us in this world. We may 
use them legitimately, regarding them always as the 
means by which we may attain some benefit, or we 
may abuse them, treating these rights as if they were 
ours alone, to do with as we will. In a college like 
ours, which is to a certain extent isolated, the college 
reading-room plays an important part, a much greater 
one indeed, than most of us seem to realize. With- 
out it, our knowledge of current events, of the daily 
happenings of the world, would be nil ; not to mention 
the great pleasure we derive from the comic papers, 
and the profit we may obtain if we will, by keeping up 
with the magazine literature of the day. In the few 
really great magazines, there are constantly appearing 
articles of science, essays and stories, attracting the 
attention of the whole world, thereby rising to an im- 
portance, which we, as college bred men, cannot 
afford to ignore. The very fact that we have received 
collegiate training will make people expect more of us, 
so if we would avoid being called by that term so odi- 
ous to college men, "slow," it will be our purpose to 
be alert, ready to absorb each article of value as it 
appears. This is but a part of the good we may get 
out of the reading-room by its legitimate use, and in 
doing it we are in no way interfering with the rights of 
others. Unfortunately, however, there seems to be a 
certain element in the college, composed of men, 
who, judging from their actions, are not fit to be out 
of the primary school. There is not one of them who 
does not know that the papers and magazines in the 
reading-room, belong to the student body as a whole, 
and that when they cut out college notes, items, etc., 
they are robbing each one of their college mates. We 
have certainly reached a most deplorable state, if the 
practice on the part of a few, does not arouse suffi- 
cient adverse public opinion on the part of the students 
to prevent its occurring again. This matter of the 
use and abuse of our privileges might be considered to 
our advantage, with respect to many of our college in- 
stitutions, by every man here. 



rrsbu£e< 



Ninety-nine : "What kind of hats do the fellows 
wear here, anyhow?" Ninety-eight: "Oh, whatever 
suits their heads best. Most of the Freshmen wear 
soft ones." — College Life, 



THE M. S. C. 

The state of Maine, while not for many years so 
far advanced along the lines of agricultural education 
as many of her sister states has at last reached a po- 
sition where she may point with pride to her later 
progress in this direction and particularly to her state 
college where within the past three or four years all 
elements of uncertainty and doubt as to the future 
prosperity of the institution have disappeared. 

So rapidly has the M. S. C. grown in favor with the 
people of the state that it has secured for itself not 
only the hearty co-operation of the state authorities 
but also that great essential of success a full quota of 
students. No truer indication of this need be re- 
quired than the fact that the class of ninety-eight, en- 
tering in the midst of the hard times of the fall of '94, 
showed an increase of nearly two hundred per cent, 
over its immediate predecessors and brought into the 
college nearly one hundred men representing all parts 
of the state and all of the better classes of society. 

Nature in the lavish display of her beauties over 
the land of New England seems to have designed the 
spot upon which the college is located especially for 
the purpose to which it has been put. Here, upon the 
beautiful Stillwater river which forms the western 
boundary of the college campus the institution can of- 
fer to its students all the advantages of a picturesque 
situation where they may enjoy not only the wealth of 
beauty and health which surrounds them but also an 
easy access to the cities of Old Town and Bangor 
which is an advantage that every true college man 
cannot fail to appreciate 

From a student's point of view the college presents 
a field for work and improvement which will be seldom 
equalled among institutions of its age and as yet, some- 
what limited resources. During the past few years 
every effort has been made to extend the courses as 
much as possible to cover the whole field of scientific 
work and to adapt them to the requirements of the 
several classes of students. With this end in view there 
have been introduced some eight full courses and five 
shorter ones, embracing to a greater or less extent all 
the branches of learning available to a college of this 
kind. 

While realizing that the first object of an Agricultu- 



AGGIE JLIFi 



'7 



ral College must be the instruction of its students in 
the higher principles of agriculture, both scientific and 
practical, it has long been the aim of the trustees to 
extend to students of the M. S. C. a full and complete 
education in many of the most important sciences. 

In this way they have endeavored to confine the 
agricultural studies to those who desire them and to 
allow to those otherwise inclined the best advantages 
in the study of Civil and Mechanical Engineering. 
Pharmacy, Chemistry and Preparatory medicine. A 
course has also been established within a year or two, 
to accommodate the ever increasing number of men 
who desire to become electrical engineers which has 
at once proved its usefulness by its great popularity. 

Applicants for admission to the college are required 
to pass much the same class examination as in other 
state colleges of the country. For the benefit of those 
whose previous circumstances and advantages have 
been such that they are unable to pass these examina- 
tions a number of short courses during the winter have 
been established to which no entrance examinations 
are required. An arrangement greatly to the advan- 
tage of a certain class of young men without in any 
way lowering the standing or rank of the four years' 
course which has so often resulted from attempts of 
this kind in other colleges. 

In point of material equipment the college cannot 
perhaps compare with our own, but it has at least, the 
advantage of having its buildings well filled and the 
privileges they afford thoroughly utilized. Wingate 
and Coburn Halls, the two buildings used for recita- 
tion rooms, are thoroughly modern structures and are 
equipped for the best work in all departments. In the 
near vicinity of these may be seen the college dormi- 
tory, Oak Hall, which is connected by a covered pas- 
sage with the boarding-house where the best of board 
is furnished at a reasonable price. Other buildings 
devoted to machine-shops, farm and experiment sta- 
tion work are clustered among the trees which cover 
the banks of the river making altogether a most de- 
lightful bit of scenery. 

The government of the college has been established 
upon the most reliable foundation, since it involves the 
honor of the student fully as much as the oversight of 
those in authority. Excuses from absences are not 
required except after a student has been absent from 
ten per cent, or more of his exercises during the 



term. In this case he may be required to pass an 
extra examination in any or all of his studies. 

Expenses at the college have a savor of reasona- 
bleness which is decidedly refreshing at the present 
day when the man who cannot really afford to go to col- 
lege, but who is bound he will go, is so common. 
Room rent is free to all as is the tuition, and arrange- 
ments may nearly always be made to allow students 
many opportunities for helping themselves. 

With regard to athletics, that surest of all indica- 
tors of the true condition of a college, the M. S. C. 
boys have made themselves heard on nearly every 
college campus to which their location gives them 
access. During the past year they have supported a 
base ball team which has won the Maine state cham- 
pionship over Bowdoin, Bates and Colby and indica- 
tions seem to point out that there is more glory ahead 
for them. 

Military instruction is in charge of Lieut. Hessey, 
U. S. A., and while it cannot be said to equal that of 
some of the sister institutions it has nevertheless 
reached a very satisfactory degree of excellence. 

The Maine State College is a school of science and 
technology. It offers no instruction in the ancient 
languages, but gives a full list of courses in the natur- 
al and exact sciences and in their techinal applica- 
tions. None of its courses are without their full com- 
plement of those literary and other studies which are 
especially useful for general training and culture. 



FOOTBALL. 
Amherst, 42 ; Aggie, 0. 

Amherst, Sept. 18. — The Amherst college football 
eleven gave the Aggies a severe defeat on the Aggie 
campus last Wednesday, by a score of 42 to 0. Am- 
herst won the toss, giving them the choice of goals 
and Aggie the ball. The kick off was by Shaw and 
the ball was secured by Foster, who advanced the 
ball 25 yards. Then Aggie secured the ball on a 
fumble. Washburn punted the ball to Whitney who 
secured it and advanced 30 yards. In the next play 
Johnston made the first touchdown for Amherst. 
Time, 4 minutes. Boyden then tried for goal but 
failed. Score 4 to in favor of Amherst. 

Again Aggie kicks off. Foster secures the ball for 
Amherst. After several plays and many fumbles 
Washburn secures the ball for Aggie, he makes a 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



punt to Whitney who makes a run of 70 yards and 
scores a second touchdown for Amherst ; time, 3 min. 
Capt. J. G. Pratt then kicks a goal; score. 10 to 0. 
Again the ball goes down the field, only to be brought 
back again slowly, and carried again to the Aggie's 
goal. Time, 8 min. A second goal is kicked by 
Pratt making the score 16 to 0. Again the ball is 
put in play, but only for a short time when the end of 
the first half came, with the ball in Amherst's posses- 
sion. Score 16 to in favor of Amherst. 

At the beginning of the second half J. C. Burring- 
ton was substituted for Gile right end for Aggie. The 
ball is kicked off by Amherst and secured by Wash- 
burn. At the third down the ball is punted to Foster. 
Then the ball is carried forward steadily until Whit- 
ney makes a 35 yard gain and gives Amherst a fourth 
touchdown. Pratt failed to kick goal. Score 20 to 

The ball was again put in play by Shaw and was 
secured by Whitney who attempted to run with it but 
fell. However, he passed the ball back to Johnston 
who punted it back to the center of the field where it 
was secured by Harper for Aggie. After two un- 
successful attempts to make gains Washburn at- 
tempted to punt the ball but was stopped, and the ball 
secured by Warren who made a gain of 1 yards. 
Then in one more play Foster made a fifth touch- 
down ; time, 3 min. Pratt then kicks the goal mak- 
ing a score of 26 to 0. 

As the ball is put in play Foster secures it from the 
kick off and makes a 20 yard gain. At this time 
Dautel is substituted for Foster. Hall then punted 
the ball down to Washburn of Aggie. Again Amherst 
secures the ball and another touchdown is made by 
Whitney by a 30 yard run. Pratt kicks another goal 
making the score 32 to 0. 

As the ball is again kicked off it is secured by 
Whitney who makes a run of 65 yards. Dautel then 
punts the ball 30 yards and Boyden secures the ball 
in a fumble. Whitney receives the ball and makes 
another touchdown, but Pratt fails to make the goal ; 
score 36 to 0. 

Whitney secures the ball from the kick off and 
punts it back to the Aggie. Washburn then attempts 
to punt but is blocked and Tyler secures the ball. 
Dautel takes the ball and makes another touchdown ; 
time 3 min. Pratt makes the goal, making a total of 
42 to 0, 



Shaw makes the last kick for the Aggie. Whit- 
ney secures the ball and returns it, then for the few 
minutes remaining of the second half there is some of 
the hardest playing of the game. Then time is called 
with the ball in Aggie's possession. 

The best playing for Amherst was done by Tyler, 
Whitney and Foster. The best playing for Aggie was 
done by Capt. Burrington, Marshall and Washburn, 
these three being the only ones to succeed in making 
any gains whatever. As a whole the game as played 
by Amherst was very quick and snappy. Both sides 
fumbled the ball badly, and lost considerably by it. 
The blocking of Amherst was very good, while Aggie 
blocked poorly, and most of the time not at all. Fol- 
lowing is the line up : 



Amherst. 
Mossman, I.e. 



Aggie. 

f A. D. Gile 
re \ 

' ( J. C. Burrington 

r.t. R. E. Smith 



r.g. H. T. Edwards 

centre, Nutting 

l.g. (capt.) H. C. Burrington 

l.t. Kinney 

I.e. Shaw 

quarterback, Harper 



Boyden, l.t. 

Kimball, l.g. 

Fosdick, 

Warren, r.g. 

Tyler, r.t. 

Hall, r.e. 

Pratt (capt.) 

Dautel, r.h. 

Whitney, [ halfbacks I Marshall 

Foster, J halfbacks, j Nichols 

Johnstone, fullback, Washburn 

Score — Amherst, 42 ; Aggie, 0. Touchdowns — Johnstone 
2, Whitney 4, Foster 1, Dautel 1. Goals from touchdowns — 
J. F. Pratt 5. Umpire — Trask, Amherst '96. Referee — J. 
B. Hull, Aggie '91. Time — 30 minntes. Attendance — 400. 
Time keeper — Thomas, Amherst '98. 

W. P. I., 16; Aggie, 4. 

The Worcester Tech. team defeated the Aggies 
last Saturday in a hotly contested game of football 
with a final score of 1 6 to 4. Tech. took the lead at 
the start and held it throughout the game. Both 
teams played at a disadvantage, the Aggies best half 
back, Marshall, being unable to play and Burrington, 
Shaw and Smith were suffering from severe strains 
while Tech. was also obliged to play without four of 
her best men, they being under the displeasure of the 
faculty. The best work for Tech. was done by 
Vaughn, Harris, Morse and Hitchcock. The Burring- 
ton brothers, Harper and Washburn made the best 
gains for Aggie. One of the features of the game 
was an eighty yard run up the field by Harris, around 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



Aggie's right end. Aggie woke up near the close of 
the last half and secured a touchdown by sending 
Washburn through left guard. Smith failed to kick a 
goal. 

Tech won the toss and took the field, giving Aggies 
the ball. Shaw kicked off, Morse caught the ball and 
brought it back to the center of the field, where it 
went to Aggie on fumbles, who lost it in the same 
way. Tech regained it on downs, but it was stolen by 
Harper who made a gain of 20 yards for Aggie. Here 
it was lost on four downs. Vaughn gained 12 yards 
and Aggie got the ball on a fumble. Shaw made 20 
yards and Smith attempted to punt, but Vaughn broke 
through and stopped the kick. Tech then got the ball 
on downs and forced it to within 10 yards of Aggie's 
goal line, where it was lost and regained on downs. 
Goodrich then made the first touchdown of the game 
for Tech. Time 18 min. Riley then tried for goal, 
but missed. Score 4 to in favor of Tech. 

Morse caught the ball from the second kick off and 
made a gain for Tech of 35 yards. Twenty-five more 
were soon added and the ball went to Aggie on a 
fumble. Tech regained the ball, however, when time 
was called. 

At the beginning of the second half Riley kicked 
off and Harper caught the ball, gaining 15 yards. 
Tech got the ball on downs and Harris made 18 yards. 
Morse then made the second touchdown. This time 
Riley kicked a goal. Score 10 to in Tech's favor. 

In the next plays, some of the hardest work of the 
game was done, the ball being lost and gained several 
times by each side on downs. At this juncture, Harris 
took the ball around Aggie's right end and made an 
80 yard sprint, securing the third touchdown for Tech. 

Morse again took the ball from kick off and carried 
it to the center of the field. Aggie made a brace and 
by hard playing forced the ball down to Tech's 15- 
yard line, where it was lost on downs. It was soon 
regained and after one or two plays, given to Wash- 
burn, who took it through left guard making the only 
touchdown of the game for Aggie. Smith failed to 
kick a goal. Score 16 to 4 in Tech's favor. 

From this point till time was called the game was 
hotly contested, each side being obliged to do its best 
for every inch of ground gained. Aggie had the ball 
when time was called. As a whole the work of 
Aggie's team shov/ed a very decided improvement and 



had she gone into the game with the spirit and dash 
which she showed during the last ten minutes the 
score might have been far different. 

There is, however, great evidence of a need of hard 
work by the team as good team play has been lacking 
to a great extent so far and many of the plays show 
almost an entire absence of blocking. The line up 
was as follows : 



WORCESTER TECH. 

Goodrich, l.e, 

Booth, l.t.. 

Harrington, Ross, 1, 

Riley, 

Perkins, r.g., 

Parks, r.t., 

Harris, (capt.) r.e., 

Willis, 

Hitchcock, Vaughn, 

Morse, 

Score — Tech 16, t 



ACGIE 

r.e,, Gile 

r.t., Jones 

r.g., Jones 

center. Nutting 

l.g., (capt.) Burrington 

l.t., Smith 

I.e., Shaw 

quarterback, Harper 

halfback, J. C. Burrington, Nichols 

fullback, Washburn 

jie 4. Touchdowns for Tech — Harris 



1, Goodrich 1, Morse 1 ; for Aggie, Washburn 1. Goals from 
touchdowns for Tech — Riley 2 ; Aggie none. Umpire — F. E. 
De Luce, M. A. C. '96. Referee— P. A. Leamy, M. A. C. 
'96. Time — two 20 minute halves. Attendance — 175. Time- 
keeper— H. W. Moore, M. A. C., '96. 



The time of year has come when one mind per 
capita is not enough for the ordinary class of Students. 
Imagine if you can how much unoccupied territory 
there is in an average sized thinking region after each 
of the following have taken a claim. The circus, 
theses.banquets, examinations, publics, picnics, gradu- 
ating outfits, entertaining guests, quinquennial, com- 
mencement week in general and — and things which 
it would be kinder not to mention. — Earlhamite. 



A SONNET. 
A smile of rarest beauty came to me, 

Enriching life and softening sorrow's pang ; 

As through the darkest night the sweet notes rang, 
Proclaiming peace upon the troubled sea. 
Straight to my soul this messenger a key 

Applied : unlocked the cell wherein did hang 

The weight of human misery. Then sang 
My solaced heart a joyful song and free. 

So kindness breaks the barriers of grief 
Illumining darkest woe with radiant light ; 
Bringing from heaven a comfort true and bright 

And making earthly sorrows seem but brief : 

A heavenly gift found only in the sheaf 
Of God's great mercy and of endless right. 

— M. C. T. in College Life. 



2b 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^©liejlf ftlotfs- 



— State Secretary Lewis of the Y. M. C. A. will 
visit the college Sunday, Oct. 13. 

— The freshman class was photographed by Schillare 
at Northampton, Friday, Sept. 27th. 

— Rev. W. H. Ashley of Shelburne Falls occupied 
the pulpit Sunday, Sept. 29th, in exchange with Dr. 
Walker. 

— The old rope -pull team of '96 has challenged the 
other classes in college to a contest. It has not been 
accepted. 

— The next bulletin of the Hatch Experiment 
Station will be an Index to all the previous publications 
of the Station. 

— The officers of the Tennis Association are as 
follows: Pres., H. T. Edwards, '96 ; sec. and ireas., 
C. A. Peters, '97. 

— Horticultural Fair opens in Horticultural Hall, 
Boston, on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 4 and 5. It 
will pay you to go. 

— The addition to the Botanical Laboratory which 
was planned last spring has been deferred till some 
more convenient time. 

— So many changes and corrections were necessary 
in the schedule of class exercises, that a new one has 
been printed and distributed. 

— The Sophomore-Freshman foot-ball game has 
been postponed indefinitely, or untill there are enough 
men in '98 to turn out an eleven. 

— Major Henry E. Alvord, former professor of mili- 
tary and agriculture at the college, is now chief of 
the Dairying Department at Washington. 

— H. M. Thomson, assistant agriculturist at the 
Hatch Experiment Station, is now in South Dakota 
buying a carload of cattle for the college farm. 

— M. E. Sellew, '96, is forming a class in dancing 
under the instruction of Prof. A. X. Petit. A fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for the full course of twenty 
lessons. 

— The Natural History society has elected A. S. 
Kinney president in place of F. P. Washburn, '96, 
resigned. Arrangements are being made for some 
interesting trips this fall. 



—On Thursday, Sept. 12, Prof, S. T. Maynard 
delivered an address on "Fruit Culture in New 
England" before the Washington County Agricultural 
Society, Kingston, Rhode Island. 

— The officers of the Democratic club are as fol- 
lows : Pres., J. M. Barry, '97; vice-pres., S. W. 
Fletcher, '96 ; sec, P. H. Smith, '97 ; treas., C. A. 
Peters, '97 ; director, C. I. Goessmann, '97. 

— The first Senior debate is on Tuesday, Oct. 8 ; 
subject, "Resolved that the annexation of Canada to 
the U. S. would be advantageous to the latter." 
Affirmative, Burrington, Clapp ; Negative, Cook and 
DeLuce. 

— Officers of the Press Club are as follows : Pres., 
M. E. Sellew, '96 ; vice-pres., J. M. Barry, '97 : sec, 
F. H. Read, '96 ; executive committee with the offi- 
cers, P. A. Leamy, '96, J. L. Bartlett, '97, A. M. 
Kramer, '96, and G. A. Peters, '97. 

— The auction of the reading-room papers occurred 
Monday evening, Sept. 16, with P. A. Leamy, '96, 
auctioneer. Several additions and improvements have 
been made in the Reading-room and the Association 
is once more established on a firm basis. 

— On Wednesday, Sept. 25, all college exercises 
were suspended for the benefit of those wishing to 
attend the Hampshire fair. The Senior class in Hor- 
ticulture acted as judges of fruits, flowers and vege- 
tables under the direction of Prof. Maynard. 

— The Republican club has elected the following 
officers for the year: Pres., H. H. Roper, '96; vice- 
pres., A. S. Kinney, '96 ; sec.L. F. Clark, '97 ; treas., 
J. A. Emrich, '97 ; directors, B. K. Jones, '96, JW. 
Allen, '97, C.H.A. Thompson, '98, and E. M.Wright, 
'99. 

— The latest in the line of clubs is the Populist 
Club with the following officers : Pres., W. B. Harper, 
'96; vice-pres., C. A. King, '97 ; sec, F. C. Barclay, 
'97; treas., S. E. Smith, '99. The object of this 
club we have been unable to determine. We doubt 
if any one definitely knows. 

— The Washington Irving Literary society has re- 
vived and elected the following officers : Pres., W. L. 
Pentecost, '96 ; vice-pres., H. T. Edwards, '96; sec- 
retary, F. C. Barclay; treas., C. A. Peters. This 
organization should be better supported than it has 
been for the past few years. 



Aggie life. 



21 



— The college Glee and Banjo club has arranged 
the following concerts : Nov. 22, in the Chapel ; Nov. 
29, Warren, Mass. Other engagements are expected 
but are not definitely arranged. Let every man go to 
the concert in the chapel and give the Club a good 
send off on a successful season. They are working 
hard and deserve the hearty support of the college. 

— After many disputes and misunderstandings the 
Sophomore- Freshman rope-pull has at last passed 
into history. The result was as expected, a complete 
victory for '98. Although '99 got the drop by a few 
inches, they lost their advantage at the first heave and 
were at least fifteen feet behind when time was called. 
Prof. Cooley acted as referee. Time, 2 minutes. 
The teams were as follows: '98 — Kinsman, capt., 
Thompson, Nickerson, Montgomery, Warden, Eaton. 
'99 — Guile, capt., Dutcher, Beaman, Holt, Turner, 
Hooker. 

— Benjamin F. West, Mass. commissioner for the 
Atlanta Exposition, has been at college to negotiate 
for the use of the exhibit which represented the college 
at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. 
Among the exhibits to be loaned are the collection of 
Mass. timber trees from the Botanic Dep't, seeds, 
grasses and varieties of corn and potatoes from the 
Agricultural Dep't, and a collection of building stones 
recently presented to the college by the state. The 
college exhibit will be under charge of J. C. Dillon, 
former superintendent of the college farm. 

— On Saturday, Sept, 21. while G. H. A. Thompson, 
'98, and T. H. Charmbury, '98, were hunting at South 
Amherst, Thompson was seriously injured by the ac- 
cidental discharge of Charmbury's gun when both were 
shooting at a hawk flying above their heads. The shot 
took effect in Thompson's back.shattering the shoulder 
blade and inflicting an ugly wound. Thompson was 
carried immediately to Dr. Perry's office where he 
received the best of attention from Qrs. Perry and 
Rawson. He was then carried to the home of Mr. 
Charmbury. With skillful nursing and careful treat- 
ment, it is hoped that he will soon recover and join his 
friends and classmates. 

— The Y. M.C. A. topics and leaders are as follows , 
Sept. 29 — Choose ye this day whom ye will serve. 
Luke xvi : 9-18. G. D. Leavens. Oct. 3. — "One 
thing is needful." Luke x : 38-42 ; Matt, iv : 4 ; Ps. 



xxvii : 4. W. E. Chapin. Oct. 6. — "Come and see." 
Jn. i : 39, 46 ; Jn. iv ; 29. F. W. Barclay. Oct. 10. 
— Christ the way, the truth and the light. Jn. xiv : 1- 
6. A. L. March. The following men have become 
members of the association , Active — W. E. Chapin, 
F. H. Turner, S. E. Smith, J. B. Isham, B. H. Smith, 
M. H. Pingree, W. A. Hood, A. G. Adjimian, A. L. 
March ; Associate — T. E. Merriam, C. W. Smith, C. 
M. Walker, L. L. Cheney. W. A. Dye, A. A. Boutelle, 
E. H. Sharpe, C. B. Pendleton, J. R. Dutcher, J. S. 
Eaton. 

— The new entomological laboratory which has re- 
cently been annexed to the insectory, is certainly a 
credit to the institution and a valuable addition to the 
college equipment. Prof. Fernald has spared neither 
time nor labor in constructing the plans of the build- 
ing ; it combines all the good features which he has 
observed in the best biological laboratories in Europe 
and America. A glance at the arrangement of rooms 
and the various methods for promoting the comfort 
and increasing the facilities of the students will give 
some idea of its real merit. Entering by the front 
door facing the west, we find ourselves in the main hall 
from which doors open into the laboratory proper on the 
left and Prof. Fernald's private office on the right. 
The laboratory proper for students in Entomology from 
the Senior class, is a large, well-lighted room, extend- 
ing the entire north and east sides and part of the south 
and west sides of the building, thus securing the best 
possible light for microscopic work. Arranged around 
the north and east sides are substantial ash desks, suf- 
ficient to accommodate sixteen students, each desk 
being supplied with two drawers and a cupboard, the 
keys to which are kept by the students. Facing the 
south are two large closets for reagents and apparatus 
needful in the classroom. Beneath in the cellar is the 
furnace of the hot water system, with valves to shut 
off heat from any part of the building not in use. 
Directly beneath the classroom are a large number of 
piers and bridging to reduce the jar of a person walk- 
ing across the floor in the room above and thus pre- 
venting interference with delicate microscopical work or 
disection. Returning now to the hall we go up stairs 
to the second floor. On the north side are two private 
laboratories for special students, on the southwest cor- 
ner a janitor's room, and on the southeast corner a 



22 



AGGIE LiFiL. 



photographing room with developing closet connected. 
Above, over all, is a spacious attic for storage. Des- 
cending, we enter Prof. Fernald's private office, where 
arranged along the eastern side is the Biological col- 
lection of insects, in all stages of development. This 
collection, though even now very complete, is being 
constantly increased by every means within reach. 
The rooms in the old Insectory are all so fam- 
iliar that a hasty description of the more important 
will suffice. Leading from the office is the Depart- 
ment library, a fine collection of Station Reports and 
standard works on Scientific and Economic Entomol- 
ogy. It is open to students at all times for consulta- 
tion and reference. On the north side of the library 
is the card catalogue of North American insects, the 
result of fourteen years labor by Professor and Mrs. 
Fernald, and probably the most complete catalogue of 
its kind in existence. It already contains 30,000 cards 
arranged alphabetically according to orders, genera, 
and species, while there are at least 30,000 more 
ready to copy. Each card contains references to all 
the literature which has been published on that insect, 
eggs, lava, pupa habitat, food habits, etc. One can 
well imagine the labor involved in this undertaking and 
can realize its great value to both young and more ad- 
vanced students in the science. Passing on into the breed- 
ing room we find there a large number of insects in va- 
rious stages of development, each change watched and 
carefully recorded. Beyond is the old wooden greenhouse, 
soon to be replaced by a new iron one for experimen- 
tal purposes and to contain an acquarium in which 
fresh water insects may be bred. There appears 
to be some misunderstanding regarding the true nature 
of entomological work in the senior year. It is not as 
many suppose, only for those who intend to take up 
Entomology or some kindred branch after graduation. 
It is work of a character best suited to his needs, 
whether he takes Agriculture, Horticulture, Market 
Gardening, Veterinary or any other branch of science 
for his life work. After a general survey of the subject 
the student is set directly at work upon those insects 
interesting him particularly as a business man. These 
he studies and carefully examines. Work in this de- 
partment is not compulsory. Each man is made to 
feel that he is working for himself, for his ov/n interests, 
and not merely for a passing mark. It is the ambition 
of Prof. Fernald to offer here the best course in Econ- 



omic Entomology in the world. Already it is recog- 
nized as a standard. America leads Europe in en- 
tomological matters ; in America there are but few 
institutions which can claim a higher rank in this de- 
partment than can ours. Our graduates are occupy- 
ing positions of honor and influence ; our alumni are 
steadily pushing to the front in scientific investigations. 
In the department of Entomology, and, we believe, in 
all other departments of the college, there must be 
continued growth and prosperity in the future. Al- 
though appearances may sometimes disprove this pre- 
diction, a college with our exceptional advantages in 
the line of practical scientific training, cannot fail to 
receive the hearty support of Massachusetts citizens. 



JOURNALISM AS A PROFESSION. 

Can a young man be taught to become a journal- 
ist ? This is a question to which an elaborate reply 
would be hardly possible. As to whether journalism 
can even become a normal career like other recog- 
nized careers, has for a long time haunted and be- 
seiged the minds of learned men. For the knowl- 
edge requisite to make clothing may be taught by 
established rules and fixed principles ; the florist 
where activity is expended in conforming his knowl- 
edge to mysterious laws of a flower's developement; 
by the dissection of the dead body may be discovered 
laws and science of medicine. The lawyer may learn 
in the schools the instruments and conditions of his 
profession, namely, civil law and methods of court pro- 
cedure ; indeed, throughout the entire list of human 
professions there is for each and all a special series 
of laws by knowledge of which those who enter as an 
apprentice may come out a master. But in journal- 
ism, alone among professions, this is not the case. 
In this career there are no fixed rules by which a stu- 
dent may obtain fame and fortune. As yet, I believe, 
there has been no attempt made to establish such 
laws, nor to found schools for such instruction, and 
yet journalism to-day governs the world. Many 
schemes have been proposed by which the art of 
journalism could be mapped out, and at the present 
moment, when journalism is becoming daily a more 
and more influential power, the solution of the prob- 
lem likewise grows harder. This state of affairs is 
becoming more impressive. Continually the ranks of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



2 3 



journalism are being augmented by the arrival of those 
who having tried life in various other professions, to 
seek a career by chance, and often time their success 
is complete, though this is not generally the case. 
This should be considered as an evil.for to obtain a high 
place in journalism, a large number of capacities are 
required, all to be summed in the word talent. From 
this talent it is evident that absolutely ignorant men 
without imagination, with audacity and gaiety can 
fittingly fill the place and succeed in journalism. 

A remedy for the evils which are eating at the vitals 
of journalism has been suggested and at present, under 
the existing circumstances seems to be the only prob- 
able way of keeping our journalists upon a high plain. 
This is to create a body of journalists whose profession- 
al education, established training and certified aptitudes 
will reassure the public confidence. (This must be done 
as it is a work of the utmost need.) The principle is 
simply this, a man who enters the field of journalism 
should feel a "call" to that vocation, should have in 
him, through training, an unswerving vigilence, love of 
civil danger, a boundless curiosity and love for the 
truth and a marked facility for rapid assimilation and 
comprehension. If this is done, there will be created 
a type which is now rare and very much desired which 
will develop a class which towers far above the com- 
mon stream of journalists developing men who will 
proceed and guide lower classes of newspaper repar- 
tees, so often called journalists, and result finally in a 
bright and new era for our newspapers. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



The Growth of the Brain. Donaldson. A study of 
the nervous system in relation to education. The 
author seeks to emphasize some of the more neglected 
points on the growth of the nervous system. The book 
includes many tables and illustrations which have an 
important bearing on the subject. 

M. Stambuloff By A.H. Beaman, The life of this 
eminent statesman is closely connected with the his- 
tory of Bulgaria but this sketch gives special promi- 
nence to those periods in which he was a leading figure. 
He was a true patriot, saving his country from many 
crises, and by his assassination last July, Bulgaria has 
been placed in imminent danger of becoming the prey 
of Russia. 



The Soil, Its Nature, Relations, and Fundamental 
Principles of Management. F. H. King. This is the 
first volume of the Rural Science Series now being 
edited by Prof. L. D. Bailey. It is not a technical 
work, but presents the essential principles of the soil 
as relating to practical agriculture. 

Catholic Socialism. By Francesco S. Nitti, profes- 
sor of Political Economy at the University of Naples. 
This volume is intended to form part of a critical study 
of all the important types of modern socialism. The 
author has attempted to give a strictly impartial state- 
ment of facts and consequently has been attacked from 
both sides. The first edition,published in 1890, attracted 
much attention in Europe and was thought to have 
hastened the Pope's encyclical of May, 1891. 

jM©i©s And (ommerfts, 



Now that the foot-ball season has fairly opened the 
sensational newspaper editor begins to get in his 
deadly work. To the college man no words can ex- 
press sufficient contempt for this class of human nui- 
sance when once started on his path of destruction. 
If the present season is anything like those which have 
gone before it will be interesting to watch its progress. 
Within a few days we shall see upon the first page of 
some large newspaper three columns under a great 
scare head announcing a broken collar bone or 
sprained ankle among some squad of foot-ball candi- 
dates. The article is concluded by a burst of right- 
eous indignation on the part of the editor, against the 
brutalities of foot-ball after which he leans back and 
watches the public run after his wild and fanciful tale 
for the same reason that it runs after the story of the 
sensational murder or the society scandal. Down below 
perhaps we may or may not notice the account of a 
capsized yacht from which anywhere from two to a 
dozen persons were drowned confined to a dozen 
lines or so which the public takes as a matter of course. 
Well, let him pursue his mad career. At present we 
see no means of retribution. But let him beware of 
the future. Our time may yet come. 
* # 

* 

Once more the Life editor feels called upon 
to think out loud and to ask the public to join 



24 



AGGIE LIFE. 



him in wondering "where he is at." He has anxiousiy 
scanned the catalogue and the lists of the two enter- 
ing classes and is appalled to find therein barely one 
hundred men enrolled as members of the M. A. C. 

When the present senior class entered college it was 
with the greatest difficulty that rooms were obtained 
by many of its members. To-day, upon the entire 
north front of North College there are but two rooms 
occupied. Is it any wonder that our college organiza- 
tions fail for lack of support? Is it any wonder that 
our athletic teams are defeated time and again when 
they have less than a hundred men to choose from? 
Is it any wonder that our upper classmen are given to 
having the college blues and to asking themselves 
questions which college loyalty forbids their answering? 
Last year we were told that the fault was entirely our 
own ; that we saw things with prejudiced eyes and if 
we would but wait for another incoming class all 
would be well. We have waited. The class of nine- 
ty-nine has come, but what has it brought us? Good 
men and true to be sure, but how many? Under cer- 
tain circumstances numbers are essential to success. 
Quality is always to be desired but quantity is a 
mighty factor in most of the world's great enterprises. 
With all due respect to the two year men we must 
still hold that the members of the four years' course 
are the true strength and backbone of our institution, 
and so long as the number of four years men in col- 
lege continues to decrease we are forced to wonder 
what the final outcome will be. We do not wish to 
ba understood as bearing any ill will toward anyone. 
We have brought forward plain facts but only because 
it seemed our duty to do so. Now if those who read 
will stop and think with us for a moment our aim will 
be accomplished. 

He was a youth of great ability, 

Of muscles strong of great agility. 

Ambitious for an education, 

A college course, a situation, 

But having little information 

He sent for catalogues far and near, 

And read of a "gym" in the souvenir. 

He came and fought the H a O. 

Instead of a "gym" they gave hirn a hoe, 

You see he was working for the State, 

For the catalogue is only a bait. 

An athlete student he would be. 

And win honors great for M. A. C. 

— The Speculkm. 



\umm 



Students and alumni are requested to contribute to 
these columns. 

Alumni 1 Remember that a blue mark opposite this 
paragraph indicates that your subscription is now due. 
Let us hear from you. 

78. — The following notice is taken from Recreation, 
to which Dr. Hall is a contributor. 

Josiah N. Hall, M. D., was born in 1859, at North 
Chelsea, Mass., received the degree of B. S. from the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and that of M. D. 
from Harvard University in 1882. After serving an 
eighteen months' term as house physician in the Bos- 
ton City Hospital, he located at Sterling, Colorado, 
where for some years he was employed by the Union 
Pacific and Burlington and Missouri River Railways 
as assistant surgeon. In 1892 he located in Denver, 
Colorado, assuming the position of secretary of the 
State Board of Medical Examiners, of which he had 
been president in 1890. He now occupies the chair 
of materia medica and therapeutics in the University 
of Colorado. His medico-legal work has been almost 
entirely in the line of gunshot wounds as related to 
jurisprudence. His four years' training in military 
science at Amherst, under the instructions of officers 
detailed from the regular army, his location on the 
frontier, where firearms are largely used, together with 
the fact that he is an ardent sportsman, have com- 
bined to lead him to investigate this subject fully. He 
is a member of various state and local societies, of 
the American Medical Association, the National Asso- 
ciation of Railway Surgeons, and the Medico-Legal 
Society of New York. 

'81. — The editor of Popular Science News states in 
the September issue that Prof. H. E. Chapin will con- 
tribute a series of articles to that Journal. A half- 
tone picture of Prof. Chapin is given, with a short 
sketch of his life. The first article, which is in this 
number, is on " Modern Disinfectants." 

'81. — Joseph L. Hills, chemist of Vermont Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, was a guest of Dr. Lind- 
sey, '83, Sept. 14. 

'82. — To be married, at West Hartford, Conn, on 
Tuesday, Oct. 8, at 12 m., Charles Edward Beach to 
Miss Catherine Harriet Coffing. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



25 



'82. — C. S. Plumb has recently published a book 
on the culture of Indian corn. Mr. Plumb was elected 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Society for the Promo- 
tion of Agricultural Science at the annual meeting at 
Springfield, Aug. 26. At this meeting he read a paper 
on " The relationship of the form of the udder to milk 
production in the dairy cow." 

'85. — E. W. Allen was in Amherst several days 
last week. He was sent here by the Government to 
look over the accounts, and to investigate the work of 
the Experiment Station. 

'85. — Sept. 10, a daughter was born to Prof. Chas. 
S. Phelps of the Storrs Agricultural College, Storrs, 
Conn. 

'85. — J. E. Goldthwait of Boston was at college 
Sept. 26. 

'88. — William M. Shepardson is at Middlebury in 
the employ of Olmstead, Olmslead & Co. superintend- 
ing the laying out of an estate. 

'91.— J. B. Hull was at college Sept. 24-25. 

'92.— R. P. Lyman, D. V. S., is located at 328 
Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 

'94. — A. H. Cutter is studying medicine at the 
Boston City Hospital. 

'94. — C. H. Higgins was at college Sept. 16. 

'94. — Charles P. Lounsbury, Rose Linda Davis, 
married, Wednesday, July 17, at Amherst, Mass. 

'94. — C. F. Walker has been at home for a few 
days before resuming his studies at Yale University. 

Ex-'94. — L. Goessmann was at college Sept. 17. 

'94. — From Fiichburg, Mail. — The engagement of 
Miss Theresa Foster to Ira C. Greene has been 
announced. Mr. Greene is a graduate of the M. A. C. 
and the son of C. H. Greene. Miss Foster is well 
known among the circles of the Universalist church, 
v/here she takes a prominent part in the Chapin Club 
and Lend-a-Hand society. 

class of '95. 

A few of the following addresses were given last 
week but for the sake of uniformity we publish them 
again. 

H. A. Ballou, Maiden, Mass., and H. L. Frost, 13 
Stanwood Hall, Maiden Mass., assistants to A. H. 
Kirkland '94 are engaged in experimental v/ork with 
foods and poisons in relation to the gypsy moth. 



G. A. Billings, Box 710 Amherst, Mass., Assistant 
in the Department of Foods and Cattle Feeding at the 
Hatch Experiment Station. 

W. C. Brown, Omaha, Neb. 

A. F. Burgess. Winchester, Mass. Scout for the 
State Board of Agriculture, Gypsy Moth Dept. 

E. H. Clark, Spencer, Mass. 

H. E. Clark, Wilbraham, Mass., Box 1 1. 

R. A. Cooley, Amherst, Mass. Assistant Entomol- 
ogist, Hatch Experiment Station. 

C. W. Crehore, Chicopee, Mass. 

C. M. Dickinson, 68 Lake St., Chicago, 111. with E. 
H. Hunt, Florist. 

H. S. Fairbanks, 9 19 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 
Penn. 

T. P. Foley, Jarvis Hall Military Academy, Deli- 
vers, Colorado, Professor of Mathematics and Ger- 
man, and Commandant of Cadets. 

H. D. Hemenway, Providence, R. I. Superintend- 
ent at Oakland, the home of the President of the R. I. 
State Horticultural Society. 

R. S. Jones, 334 Washington Street, Brookline, 
Mass. with French & Bryant, Civil Engineers. 

S. Kuroda, 15 Holyoke St., Boston. Supt. of Jap- 
anese department of Shepherd & Norwell. 

C. B. Lane, Asst. Agriculturist, Storrs Experiment 
Station. 

Jasper Marsh, Danvers Center, Mass. 

W. L. Morse, Middleboro, Mass. 

D. C. Porter, Fairhaven, Mass. 

H. B. Read, Westford, Mass., farmer. 

W. A. Root, Deerfield, Mass., farmer. 

A. B. Smith, care L. D. Hammond, 177 La Salle 
St., Chicago, 111., with Hammond, Fry & Sheldon, 
Insurance agents. 

C. L. Stevens, Sheffield, Mass. 

M. J. Sullivan, Amherst, Mass. 

F. C. Tobey, Watertown, N. J. Instructor in 
Glenwood Collegiate Institute. 

S. P. Toole, Amherst, Mass. 
F. L. Warren, Shirley, Mass. 

E. A. White, Florist, M. A. C. 
H. W. Lewis, Rockland, Mass. 



26 



AGGIE LIFE. 



,3fft&nges< 



The first Ph. D. given by the University of Chicago 
was conferred on a Japanese. 

One-sixteenth of the college students in the United 
States are studying for the ministry. 

From John Bulls' actions in regard to the late yacht 
races, it seems that he has not yet passed the calf 
stage of his existence. — Washburn Reporter. 

Two Chinese girls from Kiukiang, China, stood the 
highest in the recent Junior examinations of the medi- 
cal department of the University of Michigan. They 
came to America three years ago at the solicitation 
of Miss Howe, a missionary from Ann Arbor, hardly 
knowing a word of English, and graduate next year to 
return to China as medical missionaries. — Missionary 
Review. 

NIGHT THOUGHTS. 
When the winds are sadly moaning 

Thro' the trees so tall and bare, 
And the moon's rays gently gleaming 

Makes the night seem soft and fair, 
Then my thoughts go slowly stealing 

To the shores of long ago, 
Where the sun of childhood shining 

Kept away all care and woe. 

One the shores are loved ones standing 

Who are dear as life to me ; 
But they're now beyond the billows 

Breaking on life's troubled sea. 
Shall I know them up in heaven 

When the gates are open wide ? 
Will they happily be standing 

Close to my dear Savior's side ? 

When the angels softly singing 

Fill the hills with welcome song, 
Shall I hear their voices ringing 

Sweetly from the angel throng? 
Will they, when the harps of heaven 

Send their music out afar, 
Lead me by the hand so gently 

Thro' the golden gates ajar ? 

From the wind now softly sighing 

Comes a voice both clear and sweet 
And it says, "Yes, up in Heaven, 

You will all your loved ones greet." 
Now the voice is slowly pleading 

That I tread earth's path aright, 
So at last I'll live in glory 

Where there's no more wind or night. 

■ — A . A . Holton in the Hei monite 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
1 1-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. M. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. M. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 



WHICH WA Y DO YOU GO HOME! 

Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09. 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 A. M. 

Returning leave Worcester at 1 1.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.53 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 a. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.13, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 8.01, 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 

New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 1 1.46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, U. D. S. 

E. N. BROWiV, D. D. S. 



Cutlek's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 



STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 

SHEET ML/S/C 

AND 



IS1C BOOKS. 
STRINGS FOR VIOLIN, BANJO AND QO! 



AT 



Cusfynari's /^usic Store, 



NORTHAMPTON. 



1* » 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



PHOTOGRAPH/G STUDIO. 

Society, Clays and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



^V, J- SCHIL,LAKE, 

10S Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

CO AL AND WOOD. 

THOMAS 0. BIIiXbOISF, 

dealer in 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



WARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1S50. 



•GO TO- 



1895. 



LOVELLS PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Glass and Group Iflopk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



J. L. LOVELL. 



E. K, BENNETT 

Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 






s 



NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 



Buy the Latest Farm Machinery and late Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stoek of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



goRERIORj 

J-sArND 

Holler 




•v., -EEDEf^s 

WRITE for 

Circulars 



110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and planting the same, free on application. 



ROSS 

162 Front St., 



><£ 



Worcester, Mass. 



.^:m::e3::e:rst house 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



E. & W. COLLARS & CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



ffiassaehusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

OOXaLBG^ FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Peiciion Horses id Southdown Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 



MASS.>GRICULTUr|AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COOCH & SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. XaiCKINSBNj 2. S. B. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Houks : 

O TO IS A. J^L., l-SO TO 5 F. 3VC. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



ILAIN 



erv a 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LIKE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A EULL LINE OF 

ETJBBEE GOODS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



j&S-ltepairing done while yo\i wait,. 



2 vn<Exix jffioir. 



BOARDING 



Livery, Feed and Exchange Stable 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mans. 



M. N. SPEAK, 



ookselier, Stationer ant! 



ewsdeaSer. 



WALL TAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SSCOXD-HAND TEXT BOOKS SOUGHT AMD SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

P ARISE AU BROTHERS, 



Cll 



1 y&i 



RAZORS HONED, BAR3ZRS' SUPPL/ESFOfi ZAi-E. 

Amherst House Annex Amherst, Mass. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BEEAE PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call J responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiY8 Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie A.g:e>-rit, C. !•*• I^AXvIVIISEe '£>^T. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SS53s SATISFACTION O-TJA-KANTEED. &/2E7 
OFFICE : 

Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 



C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge to and from all Trains. 



DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



^-SPECIAL RATES.,^3 

Passenger to center, ------ ]0c. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c. 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



e Popiilantj 

Is WW we ai 



or Glomes 

iaset io 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



Homers, Tiers, Batters, FoqMpn. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

J&.GKSOM & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 

E. W. BLGEBETT & GD., 

Merchant Tailors 



AND DEALERS IN - 



READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coals and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^"•Repairing neatly clone at short notice. ^^ 



Bea. W. Bladgstt & Gn. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



fj.ai.-i 



Sevmour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



4-Botany Supplies, Gum 



aper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, <k4- 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

Iu fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 





I— H I— H 



VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 16, 1895. 



NO. 3 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



We wish to express our hearty appreciation of the 
many words of encouragement and good will which we 
have lately received from our friends among the 
alumni. During the past three or four weeks a great 
number of letters have come to us full of praise for 
our past work and good wishes and advice for the 
future. In the present condition of affairs financially 
and otherwise the editor's lot is not the easiest one in 
the world and it is impossible to measure the amount 
of good done by just such words of appreciation of our 
efforts as we have been receiving. We wish to thank 
our friends for the interest they manifest and to as- 
sure them that although we cannot always answer 
such letters personally they can never fail of their 
object, that of making our work pleasanter and easier 
of accomplishment. 



While the football season did not open as suc- 
cessfully as we had hoped, the team is now doing very 
satisfactory work. It is not possible for one man to 
act in the capacity of trainer and captain at the same 
time, and our team must necessarily feel the loss of 
proper training. With so few men in college it is use- 
less to expect to raise the amount of money which 
we were able to raise four or five years ago. All the 
money that can be raised by subscription must be used 
for immediate expenses such as to pay guarantees, 
material etc., and many times during the past year 
the management has been forced to cancel games on 
account of lack of funds. With such a state of affairs 
it is little use to talk of a trainer and to hope for more 
than a fair team. When we stop to think of the dis- 
advantages our men labor under and the obstacles they 
have to contend with in trying to mantain a foot-ball 
team, we are forced to admit that they are doing ex- 
ceedingly well and that they are deserving of the 
respect and gratitude of every loyal student. 



Once more the question of Junior electives is being 
debated by the Sophomore class. Men gather together 
to question whether it is to their interest to follow a 
prescribed course, or to go where they may choose- 
that line of work, in which they are interested and 
which they intend to follow hereafter. They wonder 
at the small size of the institution, and at the number 
of men that have left from '96 and '97. The outlook 
for '98 is indeed barren! With only a class of eleven, 
there falls upon them the undertaking of publishing 
the College annual. With the high standard of the 
book comes high price ! And with small classes 
comes small sales ! The class is asking itself what it 
is going to do ? Would not Junior electives bring 
forth a greater number or men, who are after a scien- 
tific training, and, who wish to support themselves im- 
mediately? Men who come here are not rich: they 



AGGIE LIFE. 



cannot afford to spend time in a university after leav- 
ing here. With the new course in Landscape Gar- 
dening and Engineering men want more time so they 
can fully prepare themselves for this work. We hear 
that '98 is to apply for some system of electives. The 
Life wishes them success. 






RECENT ADDITIONS TO THE MUSEUM OF 
ZOOLOGY. 

The past summer has witnessed quite a stride on- 
ward in the growth of our museum, rendering it not 
only more complete as to the links in the chain of ev- 
idence which it sets forth, but also in its facilities for 
more orderly arrangement, thus enhancing its teach- 
ing value. 

The construction of a new case for the mammalia 
necessitated a rearrangement of the floor cases al- 
ready in position but so successfully was this done that 
father than giving a more crowded appearance to our 
already overburdened room the contrary effect was 
produced. 

This new case gave opportunity for carrying out our 
plan to enable one by keeping to the right "as the law 
directs" around the -walls, then down the centre the 
entire animal kingdom could be viewed in its natural 
order. 

Most of the new specimens were purchased from 
Ward's Natural Science Establishment of Rochester, 
N. Y., as their reputation for the production of fine, 
artistic specimens had already been amply proven to 
be an enviable one. 

Among the number of animals, some were secured 
because of their more than passing interest to the vis- 
itor but more were added to represent an important 
order hitherto without a representative or to show a 
significant relationship such as that existing between 
the reptiles and birds. 

The first specimen one sees in his journey round 
the room falls under the group Echinodermata or 
spiny skinned animals whose more familiar examples 
are the starfishes, asteroidea, and the sea urchins, 
chrinoidea. In this particular specimen the charac- 
teristic which gives its name to the group is not so 
very apparent as it is a fine crinoid, sea lily, or stone 



lily; fossil, but all the more interesting when we re- 
member that this individual saw the light of day long, 
long before our venerable Father Adam. Beside this 
ancient Pentacrinus subangularis is a beautifully pre- 
served specimen of a recent crinoid, one of the few 
survivors of the once numerous tribe of Crinoidea 
striking in its simularityto its neighbor while separated 
from it by an enormous number of years a proof of 
the grand slowness of the march of evolution. 

Reference has already been made to the connect- 
ing links between the reptiles and birds and three casts 
of celebrated fossils, two of Pterodactyls or bird-like 
reptiles and one of the famous Archeopteryx or reptile- 
like bird have been placed on either side of the west 
window near the reptiles and birds respectively. 

This relationship between these two groups is so ap- 
parent to the zoologist that he has classed them to- 
gether under the name Sauropsida or lizard-like ani- 
mals. The average observer, however, seeing so 
much to admire in the bird, and loathing the very 
thought of a reptile is rather slow to see the force of 
such classification until striking evidence like this is 
placed before his very eyes ; on the one hand a true 
cold blooded lizard but having wings wherewith to fly, 
and on the other a warm blooded feathered bird but 
having the long tail and teeth of a reptile. 

Among the wading birds may be seen a very pretty 
specimen of the Scarlet Ibis, Guaua rubra and in the 
north mammal case the armadillo, Tartusia peba, rep- 
resenting the order Edentata and the coney Klipdas 
Hyrax capensis from South Africa but nearly identical 
with the coney of Scriptural fame. 

The other mammal case contains a giant bat, the 
maned Fruit bat, Pteropus jubatus representing the 
Frugivora as opposed to the Insectivora or Insect-eat- 
ing bats to which sub-order our common bats belong. 

Finally in the wall case labled "Anatomy," which 
for the present contains the order Primates as well, is 
a beautiful specimen of the mantled Howler, mycetes 
palliatus, showing the characteristics of the family 
cebridae, the New- World monkeys. R. S. L. 



Teacher — As the twig is bent the tree is inclined. 
Do you quite understand what that means ? 

Scholar — Yes sir. When bicyclists grow up they'll 
walk stooping. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE FARMER IN POLITICS. 

Glancing back over the pages of our country's his- 
tory, we find that our ancestors, who first settled this 
continent, were, for many years people, who, for the 
most part, gained their livelihood from the soil. Up 
to a comparatively recent date, indeed, the majority of 
the American people have lived outside the great 
centers of pupulation. Even now it is estimated that 
over forty per cent, of the people live in the rural dis- 
tricts and are directly dependent upon agriculture for 
their support. 

But what a difference in the influence wielded by 
the farmers of to-day in comparison with that exerted 
in former times. We hear even now a great deal 
about the farmers being the " bone and sinew of the 
Nation," and the backbone of the Republic," yet how 
many farmers, according to their percentage of popu- 
lation, do we find in our legislatures, in Congress, or 
filling high government positions ? 

In ancient Rome many of her most able and hon- 
ored citizens and soldiers were farmers. In the earlier 
days of our own country, the leaders and founders of 
the Republic and the soldiers who fought and won our 
independence came from the farm to the council 
chamber, the legislative hall, to the camp and battle- 
field. — Today whom do we find in our legislature and 
in Congress ? We find lawyers, merchants, bankers, 
manufacturers, mine-owners, railroad men, all sorts 
of business men, in fact, but very few farmers. 

The question naturally arises, why this change? We 
have proved by figures that the farmers are not in a 
minority so hopeless as their absence in places of 
prominence would seem to indicate ; therefore we 
must look for some other answer to this question. 
Let us look for a moment at the farmers themselves. 
We see among them men of unquestioned ability and 
judgment, men of strict integrity and sterling worth, 
as is testified by their success in their chosen calling. 
We see men who would, undoubtedly, do credit to 
themselves and their constituents in any office which 
they might receive. Yet very few farmers are ever 
heard of outside their own locality. Living, as many 
do, several miles from the city, or village, even, they 
become so wrapped up in their work as to take little 
interest in public affairs, or politics, either local, state, 
or national. They are content to let the lawyers, mer- 
chants, manufacturers and other business men attend 



to the caucuses and conventions and do the nominat- 
ing for the various offices to be filled at election ; and 
in too many instances the farmers neglect even to 
cast their votes. They excuse themselves for their 
negligence by saying that the business men who live 
in the villages have more time and money to devote 
to politics than they have. That "they don't care for 
politics anyway, there is so much wire-pulling and 
under-handed work, honest men had better stay at 
home and mind their own affairs and not get mixed 
up with politics at all." Then, "the other fellows have 
the inside track and would not take any notice of us 
farmers if we should try to do anything." These and 
numberless other reasons are given; we have all heard 
them time and time again ; but there is absolutely no 
excuse for any farmer's staying at home from a cau- 
cus, or an election. It is true, the lawyer, the banker, 
the manufacturer, have fewer hours of work, and less 
arduous, than the farmer ; they live where they come 
more in contact with the rest of the world and per- 
haps have more inclination, as well as leisure time to 
devote to politics than does the farmer. Yet there is 
no class who have more at stake or who can better 
afford to take the time to exert their influence and 
power in politics, than can the farmers. 

It is gratifying to notice that in towns where there 
have been organized Farmer's Clubs and Granges, 
and more especially the latter, there has been an en- 
couraging increase in the interest shown, both in local, 
state and national politics. When men are brought 
together as in. these organizations they soon learn to 
take a becoming interest in public affairs. Their 
minds are broadened, their faculties quickened and 
hence their desire to take a hand in politics increased. 
Therefore I should recommend every man who in- 
tends following any pursuit in connection with agricul- 
ture to make it a point to join some good Farmer's 
Club, or better, a Grange, if possible. 

Now let us glance for a moment at what the full 
duty of modern American citizenship implies. We 
have inherited from our forefathers a free country, a 
free ballot ; the right to say by our votes who shall 
make, and who administer, our laws. With these 
priceless privileges we have also inherited certain 
duties. These are, briefly, the duty of going to the 
caucus and helping to make it less of a farce, than it 
is in too many instances ; the duty of going to the 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



polls and expressing by our ballots our honest, inde- 
pendent opinions ; in fact, to do the utmost possible in 
every way to advance the welfare of the town, the 
state, the nation and humanity. Too long have the 
farmers of this Commonwealth neglected these 
duties, except in a few note-worthy cases. Upon us 
then, young men, students of the Agricultural Col- 
lege, devolves the important task of reforming this 
abuse of the privileges and duties of citizenship. 
Soon we are to go out into the world to struggle 
with Life's great problem. Probably not more than 
one half of us will become farmers, yet those of us 
who do owe it to our state and to our country, who 
are doing so much for us here at college, to set an 
example before the other followers of our chosen 
calling which shall have a powerful, far-reaching and 
beneficent effect. Our less favored neighbors will 
look up to us as educated farmers not alone in methods 
of farming, but also in opinions, and will follow our 
example more or less closely in all public and political 
matters. I do not mean that we shall " go into politics " 
as that term is now generally understood, and engage 
in the wire-pulling and chicanery incidental to modern 
political life. What 1 do mean is for us, honest men, 
to take up this branch of work as a sacred duty and 
trust, doing all things, not for the personal honor or 
emolument we may receive, but for the good of this 
glorious Republic and of humanity. If we are found 
worthy of filling positions of honor and trust we shall 
be called upon to do so. Then let each one do his 
best to make himself worthy and capable of fulfilling 
the trust reposed in him ; and in all things, 

"Consult your means, avoid the tempter's wiles, 
Let heaven ey'd prudence battle with desire, 
And win the victory, though it be through fire." 



YE PARTYNGE. 
Ye moon cast down hyr noon-tyde gleame 

Upon ye tarreynge maid and beau ; 
Methinks 'tys joye almost supreme. 

'Tys near ye hour of myd-nyghte bell, 

He yet bespedith not toe go ; 
Ye poet wonders whatte they tell. 

Why stay thyre atte ye fence-gate wyde, — 

Ye gate atween — and lynger soe ? 
Thyre's much toe say on eithere syde, 

Beseems ye reasonne they doe show. 

— C. E. W. in Biunonian. 



FOOTBALL. 
Aggie, 6 ; Pittsfield Y. M. C. A., 0. 
Aggie won her first victory of the season on Satur- 
day, Oct. 5, defeating the Pittsfield Y. M. C. A. team 
by a score of 6-0 in a closely contested game. 

The game was characterized by more disputes and 
a more determined and unnecessary amount of "kick- 
ing" against the decisions of the officials on the part 
of Aggie's opponents than any contest in which we 
have participated for a long time. From this point 
of view it was unsatisfactory but we are inclined to 
doubt whether the decisions of the Umpire and Ref- 
eree, though favorable to Aggie at critical moments 
were not upon the whole entirely just and impartial. 

Pittsfield won the toss and choice of goals giving 
Aggie the kick off. On the first play by the opponents 
however Smith broke through and tackled his man 
several yards behind the line, an advantage so well 
followed up that in a few moments Aggie had posses- 
sion of the ball and proceeded to force it down the 
field to within a yard of Pittsfield's goal where it was 
lost by a most unfortunate fumble. Pittsfield punted 
and Harper attempted a fair catch but failed and Hig- 
gins of the Y. M. C. A. team secured the ball and ran 
the length of the field to within six yards of Aggie's 
goal before being downed by Captain Burrington. 
Referee Chamberlin, however, called the ball back on 
the ground of interference and then immediately en- 
sued a dispute which seemed likely to end only in the 
calling of the game as the Pittsfield men refused to 
yield the point and Aggie of course was unwilling to 
do otherwise than abide by the referees decision, 

Just as both teams were about to leave the field, 
however, a compromise was effected, it being agreed 
to consider the first half played and to proceed at 
once with the second. 

Owen kicked off for Pittsfield and the ball was se- 
cured by Nichols who advanced it well before being 
downed. Rushes through tackles and center had the 
ball well under way when it was given to Pittsfield for 
holding in the line but was immediately regained by 
Aggie through the good work of her line men. 

At this point Aggie lost ten yards on an attempted 
round the end play and was obliged to kick. Miller 
of Pittsfield caught the punt and was given ten yards 
for a foul tackle. Aggie again secured the ball on 



AGGIE LIFI 



3i 



downs and at this point did the best work of the game 
forcing the ball steadily down to Pittsfield's ten yard 
line where it was again lost. 

Pittsfield could not gain, however, and the ball 
went to Aggie. After rushes by each of the backs 
Captain Burrington took the ball and was pushed 
across the line for a touchdown from which Wash- 
burn kicked an easy goal. 

During the remaining few minutes of the game the 
ball passed back and forth without any decided advan- 
tage. Time was called with the ball in Aggie's pos- 
session on her own 20 yard line. 

Aggie's play showed the most decided improvement 
of the season and considerable snap and good block- 
ing were exhibited. Smith and Burrington made 
wonderful holes through Pittsfeld's line which the backs 
were not slow in filling up. Both half backs did some 
fine tackling and the work of the line in this respect 
was of the first order. 

On the whole the work of the team was encourag- 
ing and there is little reason to doubt that had full 
time been played a much larger score would have 
been made as Aggie's superior snap would un- 
doubtedly have overcome the greater strength and 
weight of her opponents. 

The team lined up as follows : 
Y. M. C. A. Aggie 

Higgins (Buckley) I.e., r.e., Gile 

Gamwell, l.t., r.t., Smith 

C. Francis, l.g. r.g.. Edwards 

Nichelson, (capt.) c, c, Nutting 

Kline (Francis) r.g., l.g.. H. C. Burrington (capt) 

Nuttes, r.t., l.t,, Jones (Kinney) 

Harder, r.e,, I.e.. Shaw 

Freidenburg (Buckley) q.b., q.b., Harper 

Miller, l.h., r.h., Nichols 

Heebuer, r.h., l.h., J. C. Burrington 

Owen, f.b., f.b., Washburn 

Score— Aggie 6; P. Y. M. C. A. 0. Touchdown— H. C. 
Burrington. Goal — Washburn. Referee — Chamberlain of 
the Dalton team. Umpire — Marshall M. A. C. '96. Ar- 
ranged time — two 20 minute halves. Attendance — 1200. 

Wesleyan 26 ; Aggie 0. 
The home team went to Middletown, Conn., Fri- 
day, Oct. 1 1, and was badly defeated by the Wesley- 
an College team on the campus by the score of 26 
to 0. Our team was badly handicapped by the ab- 
sence of Marshall the left half back and by the injured 
condition of several of the other players. 



The Wesleyan team was much heavier than ours 
and steadily forced the line for gains varying from two 
to ten yards. Although Aggie played a great game 
the superior weight and struggle of the home team 
made itself manifest early in the game and after the 
first play there was no doubt as to the result. 

There were many exciting features which added 
enthusiasm to the game after the final result had be- 
come apparent. The work of Gile at right end was 
brilliant and is deserving of special mention. The 
manner in which he tackled his man and broke up 
interference has not been surpassed by any man on 
the team this year. Smith repeatedly broke through 
tackle and downed the .ball behind the line thus pre- 
venting what would otherwise have been long gains. 
Burrington Bros, were in their usual form and played 
a great game until near the close of the last half when 
J. C. Burrington was forced to retire from the game. 
H. C. Burrington made the largest gain for Aggie, 
while Harper did the hardest playing and the best 
tackling of any man in the team. He was in every 
play and never lost his man when it was possible to 
get him. 

The work of the whole team shows a decided im- 
provement and while the men are light and were out 
classed in points of strength and weight their work was 
of the commendable sort. 

The line-up is as follows : 

Wesleyan. Aggie. 

Young, I.e., r.e., Shaw 

Searles, l.t.. r.t., Jones 

Townsend, l.g., r.g., Burrington (capt.) 

Tower, c, c. Nutting 

Sibley, r.g., l.g., Edwards 

Singer, r.t., l.t., Smith 

Madison, r,e., I.e., Gile 

C. Raymond, q.b.. q.b., Harper 

Berrien, Puffer, h.b., h.b., Nichols 

Williams, h.b., h.b., J. C. Burrington 

Norris. f.b., f.b., Washburn 
Touchdowns — Berrien, Norris 3, Singer 2. Goal from 
touchdowns, Berrien. Time 40m. Umpire, DeLuce, M.A.C. 
'96. 



A PLAUSIBLE SOLUTION. 

He : "I never saw anything like this tide. I've been 
pulling steadily for ten minutes and we don't seem to 
have moved a foot." She (after a pause) : "Oh, Mr. 
Stroker, I've just thought of something; the anchor 
fell overboard a while ago and I forgot to tell you. Do 
you suppose it could have caught on anything ? — 
Truth, 



32 



&GGIE LIFE. 



SOPHOMORE MOUNTAIN DA Y. 

Wednesday Oct. 9 was Mountain Day for the 
Sophomore Class. We could not have had a more 
beautiful day for an outing, and as we were with Dr. 
Stone we were sure of having an interesting trip. 

We were joined by several from the Two Year '96 
class, and left about 8.15 o'clock for the "Notch." 
Nothing of unusual interest occurred, until our giant 
glass smasher got in some of his work ; but we settled 
that satisfactorily for all parties, and arrived safely at 
the "Notch." From here we climbed up through the 
"Devil's Garden" to the top of one of the highest 
peaks of the Holyoke Mt. Range, and put our class 
numbers on the rocks. 

Having stumbled down again, we set out for Mt. 
Holyoke College. Here some of the studious (?) 
ones took in the large Botanical Gardens, while others 
had a boat race on the lake. After enjoying some 
"Birch," through the kindness of Dr. Stone, we left 
for home ; but our appetite for sight-seeing had not 
been satisfied, so we stopped and looked over Titan's 
Pier, which is the highest cliff most of us have ever 
seen. Then we started to climb Mt. Holyoke proper, 
but about half way up we came to a car station.where 
we could get into a car and ride up the rest of the 
way. Some, wishing, to get exercise, climbed 522 
steps up to "Prospect House ;" while others, who per- 
haps were a trifle lazy, preferred to ride. From the 
hotel we obtained a very fine view of the Connecticut 
Valley, and also saw Mt. Monadnock in New Hamp- 
shire and Mt. Greylock in the Berkshire Hills. 
Through some good telescopes we got a good look at 
the M. A. C. The main object of the trip to get Bot- 
tany specimens was by this time forgotten. 

We arrived safely at the foot of the Mountain, and 
right here we would say that some of our classmates 
can prove, that it is easier to walk down 522 steps 
than it is to climb up. 

Our trip home was very pleasant and will never be 
forgotten by anyone who went. 

We most heartily thank Dr. Stone for the interest 
he took in showing us around, and we hope future 
classes may have the pleasure of going with him. 

A. M. 



The oldest college in the world is the Mohamme- 
dan College at Cairo, Egypt, which was 1,100 years 
old when Oxford was founded. — Bates Student, 



f fS©°EfS. 



— The freshmen uniforms have arrived from A. 
Glynn, college tailor. 

— Prof. Brooks delivered an address on Cattle 
Feeding at the New England Fair held at Portland. 

— The " Aggie Life" Board was photographed by 
Schillare, Thursday, Oct. 10. 

— Drill has been changed trom 4-30 to 3-45 on 
Mondays and Thursdays, in order to obtain more time 
for foot-ball practice. 

— We understand that several of the Junior and 
Sophomore classes are going to Cornell and Maine 
State College. Let them go. 

— The subject of the W.I. L.S. debate last Friday was 
" Resolved, that the use of machinery has been, on 
the whole, beneficial to the laboring class. " 

— G. H. A. Thompson, '98, who was severely 
wounded in the shoulder a few weeks ago, is gaining 
rapidly, and has returned to his home in Lancaster. 

— On Wednesday, October 9, the examining com- 
mittee from the State Board of Agriculture made a 
final inspection of the college before the annual re- 
port to the legislature. 

— The Glee and Banjo club has arranged the fol- 
lowing concerts : Chapel, Nov. 22 ; Brookfield, Nov. 
28 ; Warren, Nov. 29 ; Ware, Nov. 30. Prospective 
dates have been made at Ludlow, Melrose and Athol. 

— Wednesday, Oct. 9, was Sophomore mountain 
day. The Notch, Mt. Holyoke and Mt. Holyoke 
College were visited in turn, each being thoroughly 
enjoyed and appreciated. 

— Prof. Brooks will lecture before the Ontario 
Creameries Association at Cornwall, Ont., on Jan. 14, 
subject, " Agricultural Education ; " and again on Jan. 
16, subject, •• How to keep up the fertility of the farm. " 

— The following men have become members of the 
various fraternities in college : D. G. K., F. E. Mer- 
riam ; Q. T. V., Wms. Eaton ; C.S.C., M.H. Pingree ; 
Phi Sigma Kappa, W. E. Chapin. 

— The Natural History Society is making arrange- 
ments for another series of lectures during the winter 
months. In the past these lectures have been of 
great interest and value, We shall be pleased to see 
them continued. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



33 



— The Senior debate Friday is on the question, 
" Ought the negro in the southern states to have been 
enfranchised after the war ? " Affirmative, Edwards 
and Fletcher. Negative, Hammar and Harper. 

— The class of '98 have elected the following Index 
Board : Editor-in-chief, A. Montgomery ; business 
manager, R. D. Warden; artist, T. H. Charmbury ; 
associate editors, J. S. Eaton, J. P. Nickerson, C. N. 
Baxter, G. H. Wright. 

— Prof. Maynard opened the lecture course in 
Groton, Mass., Tuesday, Oct. 15, by an address on 
" Fruits and Flowers. " He will close the same series 
late in the winter with a lecture on " Roads and Road- 
side Decoration. " 

— The vacancy left on the "Aggie Life " Board by 
the resignation of F. P. Washburn, '96, has been filled 
by the election to membership of H. T. Edwards, '96. 
H. H. Roper, '96, has assumed the duties and respon- 
sibilities of business manager. 

— The Y. M. C. A. subjects are as follows: Oct. 
13, "Follow me." Math, ix : 9 ; Jn, xxi : 18-22. 
Oct. 17, "The water of life. " Is. lviii : 11 ; Jn. iv: 
13-14; Jn. vii 37-39. Oct. 20, "The marks of a 
true disciple. " Jn. xv : 8 ; Math, x : 24-24. The flower 
committee for Y.M.C.A.for the fall term are F.L.Clapp, 
H. H. Roper and G. Tsuda. 

— About 350 tons of corn fodder have been put 
into the silos, an amount sufficient to furnish the 
greater part of coarse feed for seventy-five head of 
cattle during the winter, and for forty cows next sum- 
mer, it being the intention to use ensilage, to some 
extent, as summer feed for cattle, instead of cutting 
green fodder daily. 

— During the coming winter an effort will be made 
to arrange the schedule in such a manner that those 
members of the faculty who are invited to lecture to any 
extent, shall have one day of the week without class 
exercises and shall devote this day to that purpose. 

— The Union Lecture course gave its opening en- 
tertainment in the Town Hall, Wednesday, Oct. 9. 
The programme consisted of an excellent concert by 
the Ariel Quartette of Boston, assisted by Charles T. 
Grilley, the noted elocutionist. The next lecture will 
be on Nov. 13, when Rev. George C. Lorimer, D, D., 
will speak on Robert Burns ; or the Poet of the 
People." 



— Several changes and improvements are projected 
at the Plant House before cold weather sets in. The 
old boiler from the insectary will be set up in the work- 
shop of the upper house and used to heat the vegetable 
room. It is planned to raise the small pit west of the 
work room in the lower house to a height of fifteen 
feet, and to use it for azaleas, camellias and half hardy 
greenhouse plants. 

— The carload of cattle, thirty-six head, has arrived 
safely from South Dakota, and are now being quar- 
antined on the college farm before subjecting them to 
the tuberculin test. They are of the same general 
quality as the others previously obtained from that 
locality, but among them are a few of better breeding. 
One pure bred red Polled Angus is of special merit and 
forms a new breed on the college farm. 

—On Sunday, Oct. 6, J. L. Marshall, '96, was 
taken severely ill with a threatened attack of appen- 
dicitis, The inflamation soon subsided so no opera- 
tion was necessary, but the weakness still exists and 
will prevent him from taking an active part in foot-ball 
and other athletics in which he has been especially 
prominent. He has returned to his home in Lancas- 
ter until stronger and better able to meet his college 
duties. In his absence, A. S. Kinney, '96, has been 
elected manager pro. tern, of the foot-ball team. 

— It is with deepest regret that we announce the 
departure from our midst of our classmate and brother 
editor, F. P. Washburn, '96, who has left college to 
accept a promising position in the line of civil engin- 
eering. In him the college loses one who has done 
much to advance its interests and the class of '96, a 
man whose many noble qualities have endeared him 
to each and all. While we cannot but wish he could 
be with us during the few short months from now till 
commencement, yet we will send him to his new work 
with a hearty God speed and with a hope that success 
may attend his every effort. The class of '96 bids 
him a sorrowful farewell. 

— At a mass meeting of the college held after 
chapel, Thursday, Oct. 10, about $260 was raised by 
subscription for the support of the foot-ball team. The 
schedule of games is as follows: Oct. 19, Trinity at 
Hartford ; Oct, 23, Williston at Amherst ; Nov. 2, 
Greenfieid Athletic Club at Amherst ; Nov. 9, Trinity 
at Amherst ; Nov. 16, W. P. I. at Worcester. Other 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



games may be arranged but have not yet been defin- 
itely settled. Although our team is seriously crippled 
by the loss of Washburn and Marshall, yet we still 
have good material and should be able to put up a 
strong game. There has been a decided improvement 
in blocking and team work during the last week. Every- 
body come out and support the team. We must win. 
Hard work and persistent effort will achieve this end. 

— The value of the college paper as a means of 
promoting the literary ability of the students is without 
question. It stimulates them to work of a character 
which the most efficient English training never could 
call forth ; it provides a medium through which the 
under-current of student life can receive voice. Espec- 
ially to the editor is work on the college paper of the 
greatest practical value. He is there trained in the 
natural and accurate expression of thought, and fitted, 
to some extent, for the literary duties which must 
devolve upon every man who takes an active part in 
the leading questions of the day. Another and very 
important object of the college paper is attained when 
it circulates among the alumni, and by its constant 
presence, and through the associations which it recalls, 
keep them in touch with the spirit of progress and 
alive to the best interests of their Alma Mater. These 
are the objects of our paper, and until these objects 
are superseded by others less worthy, we shall continue 
to give our best endeavors to the support of Aggie 
Life. We have done all in our power to make the 
paper a success, and thus far our efforts appear to 
have met with approbation. But unless there is a de- 
cided change in the attitude which a large number of 
students and alumni bear toward the payment of their 
annual subscription, there can be no other outcome but 
the failure of the paper and its consequent disgrace to 
the college. There are alumni on our lists who have 
paid not a cent since the paper started, and many 
others owing for two and three subscriptions. How 
can business be conducted on such a basis ? How is 
it possible for the paper to thrive with this ever-increas- 
ing list of of uncollectible bills ? And what right have 
you, by allowing these conditions to continue, what 
right have you to deprive the students and other alumni 
of the advantages and enjoyments which a well-regu- 
lated college paper affords ? You have no right what- 
ever. Such carelessness is wholly inexcusable. Are 



you temporarily embarrassed for means ? You are 
better able to pay than we. These are plain facts. 
Every true alumnus, who has the interests of the col- 
lege and the welfare of the students at heart, will stop 
to consider them seriously, carefully, and in the spirit 
in which they are given, and will immediately report 
his decision to the business manager. 

— At the same time with the Junior trip but entirely 
separate from it, a few chosen men from the Senior 
division in horticulture took a little trip by themselves 
for the purpose of gathering a few new ideas from the 
great field of horticultural work. Incidentally, of 
course, other things may have crept in, but the main 
object of the trip was in the interests of horticulture 
and this paper shall contain reference only to our ob- 
servations on that subject. Among the many points 
of interest visited, the Horticultural Fair, Boston, at- 
tracted most attention and became the leading feature 
of the trip. The greater part of two days was spent 
in a careful study of the different varieties of fruits 
and vegetables placed on exhibition. In comparison 
with former years, the exhibits were remarkably good, 
especially in pears and apples. Among pears, the fine 
exhibit of A. F. Brown, Dorchester, was worthy of 
special mention. His plates of Bartletts, Boscs and 
Sheldons were as nearly perfect in form, size and 
color as it seems possible for pears to be grown. 
Another exhibitor of merit was S. G. Damon of Arling- 
ton, whose plate of Sheldons was without comparison. 
In all, about thirty-five varieties were represented. 
Among apples, the finest showing was made with Bald- 
wins, Roxbury Russets, Hubbardstons, Northern Spies, 
and Gravensteins. One plate of Gravensteins from 
Samuel Hartwell of Lincoln was all that could be 
desired. Forty varieties were represented. There 
were few plates of peaches but all were of excellent 
quality. One plate of Late Crawfords, hot-house 
grown, from Robert McLeon of Newport was the finest 
sight in the hall. Oother plates of Late Crawfords 
and Crosbys gave some idea of the possibilities of this 
fruit. But seven varieties were put on exhibition. 
The grape exhibit was poorer than usual in some re- 
spects, but still contained a large number of fine plates, 
among which may be mentioned a plate of Wordens 
from F. J. Kenney of Worcester, Pocklington from S. 
H. Warren of Weston, and Delawares from J.S.Chace 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



of Maiden. Superior bunches of foreign green-house 
grapes were exhibited by Mrs. J. W. Clark of Pomfret 
Centre, Conn. In all, twenty-eight varieties were ex- 
hibited. After leaving the fair our next move was 
towards the establishment of Hittinger Bros., Belmont, 
one of the most successful fruit growing firms in the 
suburbs of Boston. We found Mr. Hittinger a genial 
and enterprising man. He took us all over the place, ex- 
plaining every detail and doing everything in his power 
to aid us in our work. The farm of thirty-five acres 
is devoted mostly to pears, plums and apples, with 
small fields of celery and market garden crops. For 
apples he raises William's Favorite, one of the most 
profitable early summer apples. His plums are all 
Lombards, and his pears, Bartletts and Boscs. The 
day we were there he shipped 1800 bushels of 
Bartletts to market. The farm is run under a most 
intense system of cultivation, it being the plan to get 
three crops each year from the same ground. Cur- 
rants are planted between the trees, and rhubarb, spinach 
or cabbages between the currants. In order to sustain 
this system of cropping, the soil is kept in perfect cul- 
tivation and very heavily fertilized. These are but a 
few of the countless facts and fancies which we ac- 
cumulated on our trip. It would be impossible to give 
here any idea of all we saw and learned. But suffice 
it to say, we had a glorious time and were well re- 
warded for our trouble. 



UNION LECTURE COURSE. 

The committee of the Union Lecture Course has 
arranged a course of entertainments and lectures for 
the coming season which bids fair to surpass any in 
its history. The rates are extremely low and every 
student should plan to attend. It is a rare opportunity 
to hear some of the best orators and platform speakers 
in the country, and the concerts included in the 
course are well worth the price of the tickets. The 
following is the program of entertainments : 

Oct. 9, — Ariel-Grilley Combination. 

Nov. 13, — Rev. George C. Lorimer, D. D., subject, 

Robert Burns : or The Poet of the People. 
Dec. 11,— Prof. John M. Tyler, Ph. D., subject, 

Animal Intelligence. 
Jan. 22,— Mr. W. Hinton White, subject, A Trip to 

the Antipodes. 



Jan. 29, — Mme. Hanna K. Korany, subject, The 
Women of the East. 

Feb. 12,— Rev. A. A. Willets, D. D., subject, Sun- 
shine : or how to Enjoy Life. 

Feb 26, — Prof. Henry L. Southwick, subject, Ham- 
let, the Man of Will. 

Mar. 1 1, — Rev. A. E. Winship, subject, Our Boy Out 
of School. 

Mar. 25, — Prof. E. S. Morse, subject, Life in Japan. 

Apr. 22, — Songs Illustrated: Boston's Favorite Musi- 
cal Combination. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

North American Shore Birds. Elliot. As its name 
signifies, this book has to do only with those birds 
which inhabit the beaches and marshes along the 
seacoast, the river banks, and the shores of inland 
lakes of North America. It contains a full account 
of their mode of life, mating, and migrations, with de- 
scription of their summer and winter plumage. There 
are many fine illustrations, and the volume should 
prove, as its author intended, a very useful book of 
reference for naturalists, sportsmen, and others who 
are interested in bird life. 

Frail Children of the Air. Scudder. This volume 
consists of papers selected from the author's "Butter- 
flies of the Eastern United States and Canda." The 
selections have been divested of technicalities as 
much as possible with the idea ot gaining a deeper 
interest and closer attention for our butterflies on the 
part of the public. The papers are written in a popular 
style, and cannot fail to interest many who do not care 
to go deeply into detail. 

Foil and Saber. A grammar of fencing in detailed 
lessons for professor and pupils. By Louis Rondelle. 
This volume is an exhaustive treatise on the science 
of fencing as taught in France at the Military School 
of Joinville le Dont. The illustrative plates showing 
fencers in various positions of attack and parry ought 
to prove of great value to all who are interested in 
this manly art. 

Signs and Seasons. By John Burroughs. This 
little volume pictures the charms of nature in a very 
attractive manner. The author has made a study of 
the fields and forests and of the life they contain. His 
writings are full of picturesque descriptions and pleas- 
ing sketches of animal life and are well worth reading 
to the student and lover of nature. 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SENIOR CLASS APPOINTMENTS. 
Class orator, P. S. W. Fletcher. 
Pipe orator, Frank E. DeLuce 
Campus orator, Patrick A. Leamy. 
Ivy poet, Erford W. Poole. 
Campus poet, Frank P. Washburn. 
Supper. 
Toastmaster, William L. Pentecost. 
Class poet, Harry H. Roper. 
Schemer for the Future, Walter B. Harper. 
Schemer on Schemer, Merle E. Sellew. 
Historian, Frank E. DeLuce. 
( Albin M. Kramer. 
1 rumps, j Rober t P. Nichols. 

Odist, Harry T. Edwards. 

Committees. 
Cane Committee. 
Chairman, A. S. Kinney, F. E. DeLuce, M. E. 
Sellew, H. T. Edwards. 

Cup Committee. 
Chairman, F. H. Read, H. W. Moore, A. M. Kramer, 
R. P. Nichols, A. S. Kinney. 

Class Flower Bed Committee. 
Chairman, J. L. Marshall, F. H. Read, I. C. Poole, 
Geo. Tsuda, L. J. Shephard. 

Picture Committee. 
Chairman, B. K. Jones, H. H. Roper, E. W. Poole, 
A. B. Cook. 

Printing Committee. 
Chairman, C. A. Nutting, I. C. Poole, F. B. Shaw, 
S. Saito. 

Promenade Committee. 
Chairman, P. A. Leamy, F. E. DeLuce, F. L. Clapp, 
M. E. Sellew, A. S. Kinney, H. T. Edwards, H. 
W. Moore. 

Supper Committee. 

Chairman, F. B. Shaw, P. S. W. Fletcher, J. F. 

Hammar, W. L, Pentecost, S. Sastre. 

Music Committee. 

Chairman, W. B. Harper, Frank E. DeLuce, P. S. 

W. Fletcher. 

Committee on Class Day. 

Chairman, W. L. Pentecost, J. L. Marshall, C. A. 

Nutting, H. H. Roper, M. E. Sellew. 

Finance Committee. 

Chairman, H. T. Edwards, W. L. Pentecost, F. L. 

Clapp. 



o-fce and ^omm&rJC. 



Election day is near at hand and although few col- 
i lege men will be able to enjoy the privilege of voting 
for the man of their choice they should all be inter- 
ested in the great political questions which confront 
the mass of voters. College men will in a few years 
be called upon to form an important factor in control- 
ing the destiny of this great Republic and it is but 
fitting and proper that v/e should study principles which 
are soon to command our attention. The lesson 
which is to be learned from the political revolutions 
which have taken place in New York, New Jersey, 
and elsewhere during the past few years must impress 
the young voter with the necessity of a careful study 
of those principles of government which are being ad- 
vanced by the great parties of to-day. Nowhere can 
the mind be taught to think more correctly than at col- 
lege and in consequence of that fact, let us not think 
too lightly of those subjects upon which we will soon 
be asked to pass judgment. 

Alumni- 

'90. — C. H. Jones has returned from a ten month's 
absence at Swan Island where he has been engaged 
as chemist for a fertilizer company. 

'93. — Joseph Baker was at college last week. 

'94. — A. H. Kirkland was at college a few days 
ago. 

'94. — The address of C. H. Higgins is 6 Union 
Ave., Montreal, Can. 

'94. — P. E. Davis has been offered a desirable 
position on Levi Morton's New York farm. 

'95. — T. P. Foley's address is Montclair, Col. 



THE HONEY. 
Thus mused the busy little bee, 

As sweet he sipped the flower : 
"1 gather honey, don't you see, 

To eat in wintry hour." 
And when he filled each little cell 

And made a honey-comb, 
The farmer said : " 'Tis well." 

And took the honey home. 



-Sunny Hour. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



37 



,:gcH&rvf|@S' 



THE CRUSADE OF TRUTH. 
Brightly a cross and banner 

Waved o'er a flower-wreathed barque, 
While morning cast its purple flush 

O'er the sea crest dark. 

The weary, anxious voyager 

His oars still swiftly plied, 
While blue waves rippled at his feet, 

And south winds softly sighed. 

An isle of wondrous beauty 

Gleameth the waters o'er, 
And the dreamer's restless, soul-lit eyes 

Look wistfully ashore. 

Through nights of starry glory, 

And many a summer day ; 
Through winter storms and April showers 

The vessel kept its way. 

But nearer and still nearer 

Grew the island's wavy bowers. 
And the dews of death fell softly, 

Like rain-pearls on the flowers. 

Around the cross and banner 

The purple shadows fell, 
And I heard low, mournful music 

Like the tolling of a bell. 

The light of day had faded 

Far in the rosy west, 
And pale, white violets slumbered 

Around the wood-lark's nest. 

1 heard a song of rapture, 
And I knew the barque had moored 

Where the beauty and the truthfulness 
Of Eden are restored, 

—E. B. Snell, '98, in N. H. College Monthly. 

A SONG OF THE NEW WOMAN. 
Ages past, in old-time Hellas, 

When the world and love were young. 
Long ere Helen fled from Sparta, 

Long ere deathless Homer sung, 
Camped two armies, hostile minded, 

'Neath a forest's spreading fronds. 

Now it chanced an Attic picket, 

Lost and wandering far afield, 
Happened on a fair young warrior 

Leaning on her crescent shield. 
Who was there to look or listen 

If they dropped their warrior pride? 
When their comrades, searching, found them, 

They were strolling side by side. 



So they met and so they mingled 

Till their leader, bold and strong, 
Left his tent to hasten battle, 

Raised the pason, loud and long ; 
But he paused in swift amazement 

As the trumpet's summons rose : 
"Which are friends and which are hostile ! 

Chieftains mine, where be our foes?" 
L' Envoi. 
Masters all, old Greece is silent, 

Vanquished are her warrior sons, 
But the old new woman lingers : 

Still the hardy Amazons 
Urge their right with voice and stylus : 

Mankind rise, their way oppose ! 
"Eh ! but which are friends or hostiles ? 

Masters mine, where be our foes ?" 

— W. H. I. in Sequoia. 

LOVED AND LOST. 

"It is better to have loved and lost 
Than never to have loved at all." 

— Tennyson. 

It is not so ! No, it were better far 

Never to love, than love and lose again 

Better to have a sky without a star 
Than for one setting weep in bitter pain. 

It were better ne'er to know the tender smile 
Than miss it when its love is needed most ; 

To sail without a rudder all the while 

Than, having one, lose it while tempest-toss 'd 

When slowly falling on the coffin lid 

We hear the turf that covers the dear clay, 

How is it better that our hearts lie hid 

In the dark grave from which we turn away ? 

Or even worse than this ; when the beloved eye. 
Turning from us to others, gives its light, 

And our loved ones come no more nigh, 
Then our life hopes forever take their flight. 

Can it be better as the endless days 

Drag slowly all their weary length along, 

To know that once affections gentle rays 

Brightened all life with tenderness and song ? 

What is there in such agony as this 

Better than the unconsciousness of 'those, 

Who never loving, dream not of its bliss. 
And never losing, taste not of its woes ? 

Away the thought ! No ! it were better far 
Never to love than love and lose again ; 

Better to have a sky without a star, 
Than, for one setting, weep in bitter pain. 
— William J. Benners, Ja., in Ladies' Every Saturday. 



38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE SOLILOQUY OF THE COLLEGE SKELETON. 

Extract from Class Poem by M. G. Kains, Michigan Agr'l 

Collece, '95. 

Here I hang from day to day suspended by my skull, 

Be the classes grave or gay, my life is always dull 

When death pounced on my transient life and made it life 

eternal, 
A surgeon hung my hard remains in this class-room infernal. 

Once I was clothed with flesh and skin, and auburn was my 

hair, 
My form was plump and muscular.but now my bones are bare. 
1 hear the prof, talk of the parts I parted with long ago ; 
He speaks of tendons, teeth and lungs, and how my blood 

did flow. 

Now tibia, femur, scapula, ribs, clavicle and skull 

Patella, ulna, vertebra, compose an aspect dull. 

But now and then a thrill of life comes o'er my manly frame 

When the professor's back is turned the juniors play a game. 

By dressing me in modern clothes to cover my shrunken 

shanks, 
And with many more habiliments, they play their childish 

pranks. 
Now I am a dashing dude in natty garments bright, 
And then an aborigine with clothing very light. 

These little things remind me of the time when I had breath : 
The smokers give me pipes to smoke — I swore off after death. 
But little things please little minds, (the juniors still are young) 
When they attain their senior year, they'll give such tricks no 
tongue. 

— The Speculum. 

She stood on the platform awaiting the train, 

That soon was to bear me away ; 
She spoke of the pleasures we'd had since I came, 

I wished that vacation might stay. 

She took from my fingers a delicate rose, 

And said in a voice sweet and low ; 
That I may remember my love when he goes, 

I'll press this in my diary so. 

I watched her as slowly she plucked from its place, 

Each petal half faded or dead ; 
Then drawing near to her sweet smiling face, 

I softly whispered and said : 

I too, will have a memento my dear, 

If you think your mama does not see : 
My arms we will use for a diary here, 

And you shall my sweet blossom be. 

The maiden looked up with a playful smile, 
And whispered, "I think that with care, 

The Rose you are now to leave for awhile, 
A little more pressing will bear. 

— W. H. M. in Williams Weekly. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
11-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. M. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. M. and from 6-30 to 8 p. M.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. M. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. M. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. M. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 

Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware. Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09. 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 a. m. 

Returning leave Worcester at 11.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 a. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. M. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 8.01, 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 11.46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m.. 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. 1ST. BROWN, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



c 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LAKGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



SHEET MUSIC 

AND 

MUSIC BOOKS. 

STRINGS FOR VIOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAR. 



AT 



Cusfiman/s Wusic Store, 



NORTHAMPTON. 



Merchant Tailor 

Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



SCHXAEARE'S 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDSO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

108 Main Stkf,et, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

COAL AND WOOD. 

THOMAS C. DILLON, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



•BILLIARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



GO TO- 



1895. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Soeiety, Glass and Group tflofk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



J. L. LOVELL. 



E. R, BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



Aggie life. 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 






KORTHAAIPTOK. 



FINE CLOTHING 
AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS^ CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



Zsssm^mzsmmm&s; 2 s*3 ^■v "y --^^gg5=^g^j^smaass^s^^^ 



Boy the Latest Fail Machinery and lake Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



RCULARS 




110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and planting the same, free on application. 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEUF. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agriculture.! College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FJUIM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percheron Horses and Southdown Step, 

Aud we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 



MASS./GRICULTUF|AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST. MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COUCH & SON'S. 



Aggie Life. 



E. B. HIOKINBQN, B. B. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

3 TO IS A. 3VI_, l-SO TO S JP. Iv£- 



Ethei' and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 

G. M. CHAMBERLAIN, 

Livery arid Feed Stable. 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 

TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

:RTJ"n3:BE:R CrOOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



&&"Iitpairittg done while yotl wait,. 



3\ 



i) pnasmx bow. 



y l'iji%l IWUIs Gt OUSLbb B III, 
BOARDING 

LiYerpeed and Exchange Stable 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

BooHsr. Stationer id Mr 



l«r. 



WALL PATERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 



RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

:E>:Ea:^.:tJ,:r>d:.^cisT. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles 
Sunday and night callj responded to at residence, first door 
■west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

erative Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, C. Ei*. PAI^MER '©-y. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

S^SATISPAOTION GUARANTEED. 4&- 

Office : 

Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge to and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 

^-SPECIAL EATES.^^ 

Passenger to center, - 10c. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c. 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Tfti Popularity of w Clones 
; m are Pleases 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



ififfl, 



iotQierc, Taiiars. Hatters. Ftintlstiers. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 



They make a specialty of 

NT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and HeavyMittens and Gloves 



Q. 1ST; BLDS&ETT i OD., 

Merchant Tailors 

AND DEALERS IK 

READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth S5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^"■Repairing neatly done at short notice. ^gg 



Eeq. 1ST. Blndtfett & Da. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 

¥1 



4-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, &c.«K 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 30, 1895. 



NO. 4 



tsGl 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER. '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97. Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



Danforth K. Bangs, one who has since its founding, 
taken a deep interest in the welfare of the college, 
died suddenly on Saturday, Oct. 19, after a few hours 
illness, at the ripe age of eighty-eight. At the time of 
the establishment of the college, the large track of 
land beginning just north of Prof. Maynard's house, 
taking in Dr. Walker's house and the whole of the 
ravine, and extending as far as the Hadley line, was 
bought of Mr. Bangs. Later he generously gave to 
the college the lot of land forming the triangle at the 
entrance to the grounds, receiving in acknowledge- 
ment an autograph letter from Gov. John D. Long, 
President of the Trustees. It seems fitting that the 
death of Mr. Bangs be mentioned here, not merely 
because of his friendly concern in matters pertaining 
to the college, but because he will be very pleasantly 
remembered by many of the early alumni. 



It is indeed encouraging to the editors of the Life 
to receive word from the alumni regarding the work 
that is being done on the college paper, and to learn 
in this way that our efforts are being appreciated. 
Just at the present time, when the paper is not in the 
best condition financially, it is a source of satisfaction 
to read these words from an old alumnus, who, by the 
way, was an editor of the Life when in college, " I 
would go down to the depths of my pockets to aid the 
Life if it was necessary." It is sad, however, to know 
that all the alumni are not like this and to know that 
could we only get what is owed the paper in the way 
of subscriptions we would not be obliged to turn quite 
so sharp corners as we are obliged to now. How- 
ever, we are deeply grateful to all those loyal gradu- 
ates who manifest so great an interest in our work, 
and we would say to them that we will in the future, 
as we have in the past, work unceasingly for the paper 
we have learned to love so well 






The question is repeatedly asked, why we do not 
have more men in college and why the entering class 
is so small, and the answer is always very unsatisfac- 
tory. There appear to be many reasons why the 
attendance is so small and it is our purpose to mention 
a few of what we believe to be the principle ones. 
First of all, we believe the standard for admission is 
altogether too high, and that the requirements are of 
such a nature that the candidate for admission has to 
seek preparation other than that which the high school 
can give. Is there in the state of Massachusetts a 
high school having as a prescribed course that which 
will fit a young man for the freshman class at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College ? We have no 
hesitation in answering that there is none. If one is 
to successfully pass the examinations here, he must 
have some special training which the course in the 
high schools does not afford. We are informed that 



40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



over twenty-five per cent, of the candidates for admis- 
sion this year failed to pass the examinations, and it is 
reasonable to suppose that a very large number were 
prevented from attempting them at all, because so 
much preparation is required. If the standard is to be 
high let it be so arranged that the training in the high 
schools will fit men to enter our freshman class, and 
not require them to take part of the classical and part 
of the scientific course which the average high school 
affords. Very much has been said regarding the Two 
Years' Course since it has been established, but, we 
have never ventured an opinion regarding it in the 
editorial columns of the Life, as we wished to judge 
from experience as to its merits, if it had any, and we 
have as yet to see wherein it benefits the college in 
any way. On the other hand we are convinced that 
it is one of the principle reasons why the college is so 
small to-day. The men who compose it, with few 
exceptions, could not possibly enter the regular course, 
and are men who have not had the benefit of any 
special training in the high school. When a man is 
found deficient in his work in the regular course, or 
finds he has not as much time to loaf as he desires, he 
is dropped into this "catch all" and goes on as a 
member of the M. A. C, when his proper place is in 
some grammar school. After completing a course of 
two years he finds that he is not competent to do any 
special line of work. It is said that it gives those who 
wish to pursue Agriculture a special training for that 
vocation but we would ask if any of those men who 
arranged the course had a farm, if he would intrust it 
to the management of a graduate who had no more 
knowledge of agriculture than that obtained in two 
years at the M. A. C. Such men can, at the best, be 
but poor exponents of their Alma Mater. Another 
reason, in our opinion, is the low standard of athletics 
at the college, and the poor showing that our teams 
have made against other colleges. We believe that 
this has caused many young men to go elsewhere. 
We would not have it understood that we would have 
men go to college for the purpose of taking part in 
athletics, but everyone must admit that a good foot- 
ball or base-ball team is an advertisement for the insti- 
tution they represent, and few young men with any 
loyal spirit about them care to see their teams defeated 
whenever there is a contest. The only way to raise 
the standard of athletics is to have more men to select 



from ; then the captains of the various teams will not 
be obliged to put up with every whim and caprice that 
a player may have, and will be able to replace those 
who do not do satisfactory work. There are other 
reasons which we believe are of equal importance, but 
it is not in our province to mention them here, neither 
do we regard it as good policy for an undergraduate to 
discuss them. 



^©rrtrlbutecL 



THEN AND NOW. 

The writer first became familiar with the M. A. C. 
Campus in 1879, and from that time to this has 
watched the career of the college with more than 
common interest. In my library is a large number of 
newspaper clippings concerning the college, covering 
the past 1 5 years, and at my study table are bound 
volumes of Aggie Life from Vol. 1 , No. 1 , to date. 
In every way reasonable it has been my desire to keep 
informed concerning college affairs. And so, one's 
interest is aroused, when he reads and hears of dis- 
content where he is well aware that great opportuni- 
ties exist for those who wish to embrace them. 

The undergraduate of to-day has little idea of the 
disadvantages of the past, as compared with the pres- 
ent advantages. During the four years of my course, 
the library occupied a little room and closet in the 
northwest corner of the North College, on the ground 
floor. Several fellows at different times, kept store 
in the larger room, selling stationery, books, etc., and 
acting as librarians. In the smaller room, were 
stored unbound magazines, etc., and the remnants of 
the Washington Irving Literary Society library. This 
was such a poor apology for a library that it was kept 
in the most out of the way place possible, and served 
a decidedly insignificant purpose. Contrast this with 
the library facilities offered students to-day at M. A. 
C. How many realize that there is now in Stone 
Chapel one of the finest agricultural libraries in Amer- 
ica? Many a college student studying without the 
bounds of Massachusetts would revel in such a wealth 
of books were they at his disposal. 

In 1880 the old college barn was the pride of the 
boys. It was all we had, and when that was built it 
was considered pretty fine. In this were kept the live 
stock, hay, steaming outfit, small tools, etc. Back of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



4i 



the barn was a corn crib constructed of the remains 
of an old fence. The farm house was occupied by 
the superintendent or foreman, and an L on the north 
served as a dairy. The one large room of this dairy 
was mainly occupied with a set of enormous shallow 
pans or tanks for setting milk in. The fields west of 
the line of barn, drill hall, etc., were growing corn, 
timber, stumps and brush. The class of '82 spent 
one entire fall grubbing stumps from a large field di- 
rectly west of the new barn. That was "class work." 
The undergraduate now pursues his work in a barn 
that is considered a model of convenience and beauty, 
and the most expensive college barn in the United 
States. The march of progress is seen in the cattle 
barn, at the horse barn, and in the fields about. The 
contrast between the old and new is most striking. 

About a year ago I visited the Museum. To be 
sure it is small, but the collection contained therein 
was choice, well prepared and instructively displayed. 
The room was one of attractions. In the south end 
of the old South College, peace to its ashes ! on the 
first floor, was the museum of other days. There was 
some cases of stuffed birds and animals — the real old 
fashioned museum. Then there was some bottles of 
soil, some stones, etc., but the boys rarely got in 
there. We only knew that it was the collection sent 
down from Boston, representing Mass. Natural His- 
tory. Yet its influence on the student was slight com- 
pared with the one in South College to-day. 

How some of the old boys would open their eyes if 
they could come back now ! There was no group of 
experiment station buildings then, no experimental 
feeding barns, no botanical laboratory, no insectary, 
no veterinary department, no Stone Chapel, no Drill 
Hall, no group of experimental plats, and no lots of 
good things that one might infer the fellows of the 
present time show too little appreciation of. In fact 
there is a magnificent equipment at the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College to-day, and I notice that it 
is being constantly strengthened. 

Last August when the Society for the Promotion of 
Agricultural Science met at Springfield, an old friend 
of mine of a dozen years, a college professor from a 
Western university, was in attendance. He had never 
visited Massachusetts before, and among other things 
he was to visit Amherst to see M. A. C. I saw him 
a fortnight later in the West, and asked him how he 
liked the looks of things. " Oh dear me," said he, 



" it makes me feel as though we did not have any- 
thing at our place." He was delighted with the facil- 
ities for work at the College. And this man, it may 
not be inappropriate to say, is a graduate of Cornell. 

The people of Massachusetts are progressive. Fif- 
teen years ago the college was struggliug for its very 
life, and many a caustic article concerning it came 
out in the public press. From 1879 to 1382, four 
different persons graced the president's chair, one for 
each year of my course. Things have grown im- 
mensely since then. The old opposition has died out, 
and the college has found a place in the esteem of 
the state. They realize that the institution is devel- 
oping along the right line. It takes no second rank 
among our colleges where agricultural studies are 
taught. From such a fine teaching plant, good re- 
sults must necessarily follow. The faculty has been 
materially strengthened within the past year. Soon 
we trust the college will meet the demands of to-day 
and the future, by appointing specalists in the depart- 
ment of agriculture, and having men of special train- 
ing take charge of certain work. The idea of having 
one man teach agriculture is being discarded. Col- 
leges now have Professors of Dairy Husbandry, Ani- 
mal Industry, Agricultural Physics, etc. This condi- 
tion the college trustees will no doubt recognize. It 
will mean better work by the college, and it seems to 
me will still further invite the support of the stockmen, 
dairymen, and other specialist farmers of Massachu- 
setts. 

In conclusion it may not be inappropriate for me to 
express a word of appreciation of the services of Pres- 
ident Goodell to the college during all the years he 
has acted on the faculty. The marked growth in the 
equipment at the college has come during his career 
as president. He has been unceasing in his effort to 
place the institution on a high and sound basis. With 
him still as president, and yet in his prime, it is rea- 
sonable to assume that he will not relax his efforts to 
keep abreast of the times in all that pertains to the 
welfare of the college. Both students and alumni 
should earnestly co-operate with President Goodell in 
every way possible to make the M. A. C. stronger, 
better and more influential from year to year. The 
strength of a college is made manifest in the works 
of the men who have at sometime numbered them- 
selves among its students. C. S. Plumb, '82. 



42 



AGGIE LIFE. 



, THE FUTURE OF NEW ENGLAND. 

We know what the power of New England in this 
country has been in the past. We know that to her 
this land owes its independence, the foundation of its 
government, its religious freedom, its past influence 
as a nation. We know that these will ever live to the 
honor of New England — the guiding star of America 
at her birth. 

But to-day when her sons have turned the Western 
frontier into a land rich and prosperous, when she is 
no longer the main strength of the Republic but only 
a minute part of a great nation, what now lies before 
her ? Will this glory return? No, she has not been 
a Rome who by her legions conquered, subdued, civ- 
ilized, only to demand tribute and servitude. She 
has in truth conquered, subdued, civilized, yes enlight- 
ened an empire vaster than that of which Rome ever 
dreamed, but not to garner to herself riches, not to 
adorn her temples and palaces with gold and rubies. 
This was Rome with her tyrant kings. This was not 
New England with her love of freedom. Will this 
leadership, this power return ? No. 

New England will remain in history as an example 
when stern problems face her sons. Rome's glory 
is dead and we read naught but warnings in her fate : 
the supremacy of these few states no longer exists but 
in the mind, heart, and soul of a nation have been 
instilled those principles of justice, freedom, and 
equity that will ever be associated with these rock-bound 
shores. 

What is New England to-day ? A small part of a 
large, growing, prosperous nation. True, she has 
wealth and in this still hold supremacy in the business 
of the land, but this cannot long continue ; soon she 
will be surpassed by other states. Can New England 
be a leading manufacturing center? No, even in this 
she must gradually become less important. Is there 
then nothing but decay for thisland of our forefathers ? 
Yes, here when they had scarcely built their own 
houses of logs these faithful men, full of zeal, founded 
schools and higher institutions of learning. Here, in 
this small corner of the Republic are to-day the lead- 
ing colleges of the land. Here, the very rocks and 
soil seem to have the power to fill the mind with pur- 
pose, integrity, and strength. 

Can not New England become the center of learn- 
ing in America ? To a great extent she can. Who 



would scatter colleges through the land that they 
might be simply convenient ? He who would do this 
would lose sight of the most valuable parts to a higher 
education. A college that is but local cannot fit men 
for. the broad arena of life ; it cannot teach them the 
world. We must have a changeof locality if we would 
thoroughly understand ourselves. 

Let New England rise to this calling even as she 
listened to the groans of the southern slave. Let her 
strive for this, that to her all the land may look as a 
place where learning may be found. As her farms 
were schools where she trained the early farmers of 
our country ; so now let her by her schools and col- 
leges train the rulers of the whole Republic. Let her 
devote to them her wealth, her talent, her ambition. 
Let all her sons unite to make these pioneer states to 
America what Athens has been to the world — a centre 
of art and knowledge. Let us here bring all the 
works of nature to their perfection. Let each rock- 
bound, river-washed valley be touched by art until it 
shall rival the pictured beauty of the Athenians. Let 
each woodland or meadow teach some lesson to the 
student whether he be of art, science, or literature. 
Let our farms show the height of knowledge in the 
growth of vegetation. Let us here bring the trades to 
their highest point of skillfulness that each apprentice 
may here seek his education. Let us teach lessons 
in civil government and political economy by the per- 
fect government of our own cities. Let us lead in the 
justice and equity of our laws and courts. If there are 
problems before the nation, let us be the first to 
attempt their solution. In short, let all our places of 
instruction be surrounded by the illustration of all 
knowledge in a practical way. 

Then and only then can New England still be the 
glory of this the foremost nation of the world. By 
this means alone can she save herself from being con- 
trasted with the Everglades of Florida or a county in 
Texas. 

The next twenty-five years is the critical time. 
When these have passed her future will be plain. 
Then she will be either in the midst of a new glory as 
great as any history has given her ; or with declining 
wealth and population we shall view her as the unfor- 
tunate landing-place of our forefathers — a barren, 
rocky country whose history is ended and whose only 
crown is that won in former battles. B. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



FOOTBALL. 
Williston, 14; Aggie, 10. 

Amherst, Oct. 23. — The Williston foot-ball eleven 
defeated the Aggie eleven on the Aggie campus this 
afternoon in a protested game, by a score of 14 to 10. 
The teams were about evenly matched. The game 
was hotly contested, there being much rough playing 
by both teams. Williston won the toss giving them 
the choice of goals and Aggie the kick off. Shaw 
kicks 30 yards, Williston secures the ball and advances 
it ten yards. In the next play Aggie gets the ball on 
a fumble. Nichols is sent through tackle for ten yards- 
After good gains through the line by J. C. Burrington 
Edwards is given the ball and makes the first touch- 
down for Aggie. Shaw then kicks the goal. Score, 
6-0. Sands kicks off for Williston, Edwards brings 
the ball back 7 yards. A gain of seven yards is then 
made through tackle by J. C. Burrington. After 
several other gains for Aggie by King, Nichols, Smith 
and Shaw, the ball is given to J. C. Burrington, who 
makes the second touchdown. Shaw fails to kick 
goal. Score, 10 to 0. Small gains were then made 
by both Aggie and Williston and the ball was near the 
center of the field when time was called. Score, 
Aggie 10, Williston 0. 

At the beginning of the second half Sands kicks off 
about 30 yards. The ball is caught by Edwards and 
brought back 15 yards. G. C. Burrington, Shaw and 
Smith make gains for Aggie. Williston secures the 
ball and after gains by Ridell, Cook, Clapp and Sands, 
the ball is passed to Sands who runs 30 yards, secur- 
ing a touchdown for Williston. Sands kicks goal. 
Score, Aggie 10, Williston 6. Shaw kicks off 40 
yards and Sands securing the ball makes a fine run of 
70 yards. The ball is then passed to Clapp, who 
makes a touchdown. Clapp runs outside the line but 
the referee failing to see it, the touchdown is allowed. 
Sands fails to kick goal. Score, 10 to 14. In the 
few remaining minutes of play small gains were made 
by both sides and when time was called the ball was 
near the center of the field. The worst exhibition of 
umpiring ever seen on the campus was given by Prof. 
Leech and F. E. de Luce. The line up was as 
follows ; 



WILLISTON. 

F. Bonney, 1. e., 
McNamara, 1. t., 



AGGIE. 

r. e., Gile 
r. t, Smith 



Leary, 1. g., 

Schwerin, 

Swain, r. g. , 

Martin, r. t., 

Comstock, (capt.) r. e. 

Sands, 

Ridell. ) 

Clapp, \ 

Nevius, 



centre, 



1. t. 



quarter-back, 

half-backs, 

full-back, 



r. g., Edwards 

Nutting 

1. g., Cooley 

(capt.) Burrington 

1. e., Shaw 

Harper 

\ J. C. Burrington 

( Nichols. 

King 



Score, Williston 14, Aggie 10. Touchdowns — Sands 2, 
Clapp, Edwards, J. C, Burrington. Goals from touchdowns — 
Shaw, Sands. Umpire, Prof. F. A. Leech, Williston. Ref- 
eree, F. E. de Luce, M. A. C. '96. Time, 40 min. Linesmen, 
H. W. Moore and Whitehouse. 

Trinity, 22 ; Aggie, 0. 

About 200 people watched Trinity defeat Aggie 
Oct. 19th by a score of 22 to 9. The game was well 
fought and Trinity earned every inch of ground that it 
gained. Trinity's playing was marred by several 
players failing to understand the signals at critical 
points in the game. This cost Trinity at least one and 
perhaps two touchdowns. The feature of the game 
was the 70-yard run by Underwood of Trinity about 
six minutes before the end of the last half, carrying 
the ball to Aggie's six-yard line, where Trinity lost 
it on a fumble. W. Langford also made several runs 
of 20 yards. For the Aggies Burrington Bros., Har- 
per, King and Shaw did the best work. The line held 
fairly well, and but for the confusion in regard to the 
signals the game reflects great credit on the Aggie 
team. The line-up was as follows : — 



trinity. 

Ellis, 1. e., 

Sutton, 1. t.. 

Merwin, 1. g., 

Lord, 

Gogswell, r. g., 

A. M. Langford, r. t. 

Rich, ( 

Underwood, ( 

Coggshall, 

Woodle, ) 
Bucroft, ) 
W. Langford, 



center, 

quarter-back, 
half-back, 

full-back, 



AGGIE. 

r. e., Gile, Harper 
r. t., Kinney 
r. g., Cooley 
Nutting 
1. g., Edwards 
1. t., H. C. Burrington 

1. e., Shaw 

Porter 

f Nichols 

J J. C. Burrington 

1 Harper 

[Gile 

King 
Davis 



Umpire, J. Edgerton, '94. Referee, J. M. Marshall. Lines- 
men, W. H. Gage, '96, and P. A. Leamy '96. Time, two 25- 
minute halves. Touchdowns, Cogswell 2, A. M. Langford, 
Bucroft. Score, 22 to 0, 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^"©ilejff fi©tf|. 



— The wires are up again. 

— Extended order drill this week. 

— The foot-ball team was photographed by Lovell 
last Friday. 

— C. A. Colburn of Westford, Mass. has entered 
the 1st Year class. 

— L. F. Clark, '97, has joined the Glee Club. 

— A beauty show — the collection of chrysanthe- 
mums at the Plant House. 

— The 1st Year class was photographed by Schillare 
Friday, October 25. 

— J. C. Burrington has become a member of the 
Shakespearean Club. 

— The mid-term examinations occur on Oct. 26, 
Nov. 2, and Nov. 9. 

— The Senior class has selected Horner of Boston 
as class photographer. 

— Prof. Babson will lecture, Dec. 15, on " Early 
American Literature " before the lyceum at Gloucester. 

— The Glee and Banjo Club was photographed by 
Schillare, Tuesday, October 22. 

— The week of prayer for colleges begins Nov. 10. 
We hope to observe it as in former years. 

— How can we have athletic meets this winter 
unless we have a gymnasium to train in ? 

— On Sunday, Oct. 27, the pulpit was occupied by 
Rev. J. C. Willson of Meriden, Conn., in exchange 
with Dr. Walker. 

— Friday evening, Oct. 18, Prof, and Mrs. Maynard 
gave a very pleasant reception to members of the 
Freshman class. 

— The foot-ball association has elected the following 
officers for the year: Pres., J. L. Marshall, '96; 
sec'y and treas., C. A. Norton, '97. 

— The Senior division in Veterinary have completed 
the work and have been examined as far as Anatomy. 

— Prof. Babson has been appointed assistant to 
Prof. Genung, professor of English at Amherst College. 

— Where are the candidates for positions on the 
next Aggie Life Board. We want to see some lively 
competition in this work, 



— H. C. Burrington, '96, has been appointed Captain 
of Company B. to fill the vacancy left by the resigna- 
tion of F. C. Washburn, '96. 

— Among many other new features, the discussion 
of the leading questions of the day will be introduced 
into the English course of the 2d Year class. 

— Prof. W. F. Ganong, professor of botany at Smith 
College, and Miss Grace Ghester, assistant professor, 
inspected the botanical department, Tuesday, Oct. 22. 

— The Political Economy division has finished the 
text book and will devote the remainder of the term 
to theses, lectures and the study of the Economic 
History of England. 

— The new apparatus has arrived at the Botanical 
Laboratory of the Hatch Station, and a number of 
very interesting experiments have been started in the 
greenhouse connected. 

— The subject of the next Senior debate is "Has 
the Reformation exerted a greater influence on modern 
civilization than the Renaissance." Affirmative.Jones 
and Kinney; negative, Kramer and Leamy. 

— After an exciting campaign with stump speeches 
from prominent men on both sides, the Boarding Club 
has voted to have three meals on Sunday instead of 
two as before. So be it — but there are some who 
will lose their breakfast we fear. 

— The new stock recently added to the college herd 
has been subjected to the tuberculin test by Dr. 
Lehnert assisted by the Senior division in veterinary 
with very satisfactory results. There is some suspicion 
in one or two cases, and these will be tested again. 

— F. C. Tobey, '95, is now commandant of cadets 
at a military school in New Jersey. In his senior 
year here he was a private. From the above propo- 
sitions any disappointed Senior private can draw a 
most comforting conclusion. 

— The Freshman class has elected the following 
officers: Pres., E. M. Wright; vice-pres., F. E. 
Turner; sec, C. M. Walker; treas., W. A. Hooker; 
class captain, H. D. Holt; historian, E. M. Wright ; 
sergeant at arms, M. H. Pingree ; foot-ball captain, 
A. D. Gile ; foot-ball manager, H. D. Holt ; director, 
W. A. Hooker; base-ball captain, S.E. Turner ; man- 
ager, H. D. Holt ; director, A. D. Gile; polo captain, 
H. D. Holt ; athletic director, J. R. Dutcher ; reading 
room director, J. R, Dutcher. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



45 



— The college Whist Club has reorganized with 
twenty members and the following officers : Pres., W. 
B. Harper, '96 ; vice-pres., J. M. Barry, '97 ; sec, J. 
A. Emrich,'97; treas., F. C. Barclay, '97; directors, 
W. B. Harper, J. M. Barry, W. Q. Kinsman, W. A. 
Hooker. 

— The college pin has arrived at last and appears 
to satisfy everyone. It consists of a fac-simile of the 
state seal with a narrow band running obliquely across 
it on which are the letters, M. A. C, in gold. Alumni 
wishing a pin will please communicate with P. A. 
Leamy. '96, chairman of the committee. 

— It can scarcely be a good recommendation for 
the college when a Sunday visitor goes to chapel and 
finds only between forty and fifty men scattered over 
the room. It would seem that the system of compul- 
sory chapel is not fully appreciated. We hope it does 
not deter anyone from attending the Sunday service. 

— Our boys played a good game with Williston but 
were defeated by the superior numbers and general 
good work of the opposing team. Eleven men can 
hardly hold their own against thirteen, say nothing of 
beating them. We congratulate Williston on its 
laurels. They are, as they always have been, honor- 
able men. 

— The '97 Index will be put on sale at the office of 
the business manager on Thursday, Dec. 12. Follow- 
ing the example of previous classes, the '97 Index 
Board has made every effort to advance the standard 
of the college annual, and make it a worthy represen- 
tative of the literary interests of the college. Besides 
many other new features of merit it will contain thirty- 
two pages more than any other previous volume, and 
a greater number of original illustrations than has 
hitherto been offered. We hope every student and 
alumnus will purchase one or more copies ; the 
student, as a gift to his friends and as a souvenir in 
after years ; the alumnus, for the many pleasant asso- 
ciations which the book recalls. It would be a great 
favor to the board if the alumni would send orders and 
money now, or as soon as possible. Price, $1.00, with 
twenty-five cents extra for mailing. 

— The Sophomores and Freshmen seem bound to 
have trouble whether there is really anything to " scrap " 
about or not. '98 having refused to accept '99's chal- 
lenge to a game of football owing to lack of material 



in the class, the Freshmen declared the game for- 
feited to them and forthwith proceeded to ornament 
the sidewalks in the good old-fashioned way. This 
encroachment on their dignity was resented by the 
young bloods of '98 and the affair finally culminated 
in a free-for-all paint slugging match and grand pow- 
wow after Sunday chapel. Of course nobody was 
hurt ; nobody ever is where there is so much talk. 
With all due respect to the parties concerned we 
would suggest that the corner of South College on the 
Sabbath day is not the proper time and place for two 
respectable classes to chew the rag and daub each 
other with paint. If you must do such things, go off 
somewhere by yourselves where we can not see you. 
We do not care to witness the struggle. And we 
would add that you would gain far more credit for 
winning in a good, straight, manly, athletic contest, 
than from a victory in any little game of talk which 
has yet come to our notice. 

— Owing to changes in schedule it has been impos- 
sible to give a complete list of the Senior electives 
before this. The electives of each man and the num- 
ber in each department are as follows : 

H. C. Burrington, Veterinary, Political Economy and 
Agriculture. 

F.L.Clapp, Mathematics, Engineering and Chemistry. 

A. B. Cook, Entomology, Botany and Veterinary. 
F. E. DeLuce, Mathematics. Engineering and 

German. 

H. T. Edwards' Chemistry, Veterinary and Political 
Economy. 

S. W. Fletcher, Horticulture, Political Economy 
and Entomology. 

J. F. Hammar, Botany, Agriculture and Veterinary. 

W. B. Harper, Chemistry, Agriculture, Political 
Economy and Veterinary, 

B. K. Jones, Agriculture, Political Economy and 
Veterinary. 

A. S. Kinney, Botany, Chemistry, German and Ag. 
Chemistry. 

A. M. Kramer, Chemistry, Botany, Mathematics 
and Engineering. 

P. A. Leamy, Chemistry, Political Economy and 
Agriculture. 

J. L. Marshall, Horticulture, Political Economy and 
Entomology. 



4 6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



H. W. Moore, Entomology, Political Economy and 
Agriculture. 

R.P.Nichols, Entomology, Horticulture and German, 

C. A. Nutting, Chemistry, Veterinary, Agriculture 
and Ag. Chemistry. 

W. L. Pentecost, Chemistry, Veterinary, Agricul- 
ture and Ag. Chemistry. 

E. W. Poole, Entomology, Political Economy and 
Botany. 

I. C. Poole, Entomology, Horticulture and Agricul- 
ture. 

F. H. Read, Entomology, Political Economy and 
Horticulture. 

H. H. Roper, Agriculture, Political Economy and 
Veterinary. 

S. Saito, Mathematics, Engineering and Chemistry. 

S. Sastre, Chemistry, Veterinary and Agriculture. 

M. E. Sellew, Chemistry, Political Economy and 
Veterinary. 

F. B. Shaw, Chemistry, Veterinary and Botany. 

J. L. Shepard, Botany, Chemistry, Political Econ- 
omy and Ag. Chemistry. 

N. Shultis, Entomology, Botany and Political 
Economy. 

G. Tsuda, Agriculture, German and Political 
Economy. 

Total in each department : Mathematics, 4 ; en- 
gineering, four ; chemistry, thirteen ; botany, eight ; 
veterinary, eleven ; agriculture, twelve ; entomology, 
eight; agricultural chemistry under Dr. Goessmann, 
four. 



When morning breaks — 
The blossom drinks the dew that falls, 
And hides within its pearly walls 
The nectar of its life ; and calls 
Unto glad sunshine — breaking forth 
Beneath the clouds and telling earth 
What all its beauteous charms are worth — 

That her heart breaks. 

It seemeth then 
That his will may to us endear 
Some noble thought, that knows no fear 
To drink from out this chalic clear, 
And bid love's sorrow to depart. 
For what a spear or what a dart 
Mayhap hath broken this young heart? 
Can'st tell me then? 

—I. M. W. in Williams Weekly. 



BATH ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The time has been, when editorials and comments 
on existing abuses, or concerning things about our 
college which might be improved, have produced the 
desired effect, and opened the eyes of the persons in 
authority, so that they have been able to correct a 
condition of things which should not exist in an insti- 
tution like ours. 

On the occasions when our athletic teams visit other 
colleges, the most frequent causes of comment are 
the fine bath-rooms with which they are without ex- 
ception provided. Whether they are in the college 
dormitories or in the gymnasium, they are, without 
exception, clean, roomy, well-ventilated, well-lighted 
and well-heated. It is always with a blush of shame 
that we turn to compare them with our own inadequate 
and unfit accommodations. We cannot but wonder 
whether any of the State Board of Health have ever 
made a tour of inspection through our buildings, for it 
hardly seems to us possible, that they could have done 
so and allowed the continuance of such an unsanitary 
system of bath-rooms. The college, which can ac- 
commodate 200 students, has two bath-rooms situated 
in the cellar of South College on the south side. One 
of them, the best, is out of the discussion as far as the 
students as a whole are concerned as it is reserved 
for the use of the athletic teams. The remaining one 
is a room about 15 feet square with rough brick walls ; 
it is lighted by one ordinary cellar window, and has no 
means of ventilation beside the window and door. 
The room has a cement floor and is divided into four 
compartments, two on a side with an aisle between. 
On one side are two shower-baths, the floor of these 
apartments is covered with a wooden lattice-work, 
which is only removed when decay renders it neces- 
sary. The wooden partitions are partially covered 
with tin. On the other side are compartments for 
two bath-tubs, both of these are of the old-fashioned 
tin manufacture, they are seldom if ever cleaned, and 
for that reason never used. These accommodations, 
which, as they are in a state institution, which is 
regularly inspected, are, we presume, supposed to be 
sanitary, comfortable, and roomy enough to accom- 
modate our full quota of students, but we doubt very 
much whether any of our esteemed authorities would 
care to be compelled to use them. It seems unfor- 
tunate that this state of things should continue, when, 



AGGIE LIFE- 



47 



by the wise expenditure of a sum of money suitable 
accommodations could be put in on the north side of 
the cellar, where there would be no difficulty in pro- 
curing light, which is so indispensable to cleanliness. 



Oct. 25. 
Oct. 27. 
Oct. 31. 
Nov. 3.- 
Nov. 7.- 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 21. 
Nov. 24. 
Dec. S.- 
Dec. 8.- 
Dec. 12. 
Dec. 15. 



Isa. 



11- 



Y. M. C. A. TOPICS. 
— Light in Darkness. Ps. 119: 1 
1 : 10 ; John 8-12. L V F. Clark. 
— Personal Purity Meeting. Gen. 38 : 

26 ; Num. 32 : 23. George Tsuda. 
—The Result of One Sin. Gen. 3:17-19; 

James 2 : 10. B. K. Jones. 
-Kept. Ps. 121 ; I Peter 1 : 3-5 ; Prov. 3 : 

21-26 ; Isa. 26 , 3. Williams Eaton. 
-The Wanderer's Cry. Ps. 119: 176. F. 

H. Turner. 
— Where is thy Brother ? Gen. 4:9; John 

1 : 41, 42. Seijiro Saito. 
— Co-operation in a Conflict. Ex. 17:8-16. 

Wm. A. Hooker. 
— Mastery over Self. I Cor. 9: 25. Samuel 

E. Smith. 
— Not to be Ashamed of. Rom. 1 : 16; 
Mk. 8 : 38. John B. Isham. 
-What have we to be thankful for ? Ps. 

103. M. H. Pingree. 
A Wrong Conception of Life. Lk. 12 : 15- 

21. B. H. Smith. 
Missionary Meeting. Rom. 10: 11-15. 

George D. Leavens. 
-How to be Saved. Isa. 55 : 7 ; Acts 16 : 
30, 31; John 1: 12. H. J. Armstrong. 
-Tc the Uttermost. Lk. 5 : 12, 13 ; Rom. 
7: 24; 8: 1. F. W. Barclay. 



A LOVERS' DIALOGUE. 
" Oh Tom, you are quarreling always, 
Though you say that you care for me, 
I don't think we'd better be married 
For we never could agree." 

" My dear, as soon as we're married, 
Our quarrels will all be done, — 
It takes two to make a quarrel 
And then there will be but one." 

— H., in Williams Weekly. 

♦ ■ 

" Of all sad words of tongue or pen, 

The saddest are these, Our women are men." 

■ — R.B., in Cornell Era. 



Fresh paint on the sidewalks has been an eyesore 
for a good many years. After each class victory the 
artists of the winning class spend the wee small hours 
of the morning daubing paint on the walks ; while the 
shivering onlookers "blow" about their bravery in an 
imaginary fight, though to hear their teeth rattle one 
would suppose they were so many rattle-boxes full of 
wind. It appears to us as a relic of the Dark Ages, 
when Knights thought it necessary to put their "coat 
of arms" on everything, "from my best gilded mail to 
my ladies garter," that their ownership might not be 
mistaken. Fun ! Who says it is fun ? Let him 
try it and if he is not sick of his job by the time he 
has half-finished the "forty-leven" different places of 
painting he is unquestionably one of those relics afore- 
said. The class of '98 has concluded to fall into line 
with the other colleges ; they have removed their num- 
bers from the sidewalks and their victories hereafter 
will be celebrated in a more modern way. Would 

that other classes would go and do likewise. 

* # 

Several weeks ago the Washington Irving society 
was reorganized and a prosperous season was looked 
forward to. The directors endeavored to furnish an 
interesting program for the evening and the best talent 
in college was chosen to represent both sides of the 
question. But, lo and behold ! when the appointed 
evening came around the attendance was so limited 
that proceedings had to be postponed indefinitely. 
The excuse was that the football team was away. Of 
course we understand how great a reduction this 
causes in our ranks, yet we cannot understand how so 
profitable a society can be allowed to reach the low 

water mark that it has in this college. 

* # 
# 

To the lovers of football there can be nothing which 
is more disgusting than unfairness and partiality on 
the part of the umpire and referee, and the decisions 
which were witnessed on the campus by the referee of 
the visiting team last Wednesday were the worst ever 
seen on the campus. It is beyond our comprehen- 
sion to understand how any person who makes any 
claims to be a gentleman can screw his conscience 



4 8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



up to give such decisions as were given in Wednes- 
day's game. Such a man is no credit to an institu- 
tion and his influence does not tend toward promoting 
a love for fair play for which the college man is so 
highly respected. Such exhibitions are not frequent, 
and let us be thankful for it. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Punishment and Reformation. An Historical Sketch of 
the Rise of the Penitentiary System. By F. H. Wines. 
This volume treats of the progress in the methods of 
punishing crime since the earliest times. Labor, edu- 
cation and religion are stated to be the principal means 
of reforming convicts, which is the end desired under 
the present prison system. The work includes chapters 
on the causes and prevention of crime, 

A Manual of Forestry. Vol.3. By W. Schlich. In 
this volume Forest Management is discussed under 
the four heads, Forest Mensuration, Forest Valuation, 
Principles of Forest Working Plans, and Preparation 
of Forest Working Plans. 

Volume 4, by W. R. Fisher, treats of the Protection 
of Forests against men, animals, plants, atmospheric 
influences and other natural phenomena, and diseases. 
Both volumes are fully illustrated, making them of 
much interest to the student of Economical Forestry, 

Hidden Beauties of Nature. Richard Kerr. This 
little book describes many interesting forms of plant 
and animal life which can be seen only through the 
microscope. Some of the most ordinary looking ob- 
jects are found, when closely examined, to contain 
beauties, unseen before, surpassing the most magnifi- 
cent works of man. As a favorite object of micro- 
scopic examination, the author describes the Building 
Rotifer, which builds about itself a cigar shaped brick 
house out of the earthy matter suspended in the water 
in which it lives. By coloring the water rows of 
colored bricks may be produced. The purpose of the 
author is to call the attention to these minute wonders. 
A number of illustrations from sketches and photo- 
graphs add much to the interest of the book. 



"Give me your hand!" he did implore. 

She was so pretty too, the elf! 
But unto him, she scornfully spake, 

" I'll play this hand myself." 



— Exchange. 



s u ni n i . 



Alumni and students are requested to contribute to 
these columns 

'80. — Almon H. Stone, Professor in charge of 
farm at Tongaloo, Miss., comes here next month to 
pursue a post-graduate course. 

'82. — Married, at Fresno, Cal., on October 20th, 
Miss Lillie Trueworthy to Mr. Charles D. Hillman. 

'86. — Change of address: Dr. Winfield Ayers is at 
1 17 West Ninety-fifth street, New York. 

'88. — Married at Haverhill, Mass., on October 
16th, Mary Jackson Swett to Francis H. Foster. At 
home, Fridays in December, at 68 Central street, 
Andover, Mass. 

'9 1 . — Address of E. P. Felt is 56 Lancaster street, 
Albany, N. Y. Mr. Felt is assistant to Dr. Lintner, 
State Entomologist. 

'91. — Address of M. A. Carpenter is 215 Arlington 
street, Mt. Auburn, Mass. 

'92.— Card, Richard P. Lyman, M. D. V., Veteri- 
narian. Office, 328 Asylum street, Hartford, Conn. 

'94. — A. H. Kirkland was at College, October 25. 

'95. — H. B. Read was at College last week. 

'95. — C. B. Lane gave an address before the Pro- 
hibition League of the Storrs Ag'l College Oct. 1 1 , 
subject, "Temperance and the College Student." 



TRAVELERS. 
To-night I was reading of Goldsmith, 

The traveler o'er mountain and main, 
Who, no matter wherever he journeyed, 

Felt the weight of a lengthening chain. 

My memory turned back on life's journey, 

Trod its sinuous paths once again ; 
As 1 came to each summit and turning, 

I, too, felt the weight of the chain. 

How fair are the visions that cluster 

Around the years that are gone! 
And the spectres, which come all unbidden, 

Like Banquo's ghost will not down. 

As Goldsmith, we, too, are travelers 
To scenes that are new and untried ; 

No longer we wait on the seashore, 
But launch on the flow of the tide ; 

In safety may God waft us over. 

—J. H. C. , in the Bi unonian. 



I 



AGGIE LIFE. 



49 



'$' 



Dartmouth has its first woman student this fall. 

A course in Japanese will be offered by Chicago 
University. 

The average expense to Yale students last year was 
$1,132. 

The University of Michigan boasts a fraternity which 
admits both sexes to its membership. 

The United States government lost its suit to 
recover $15,000,000 from the Stanford estate, much 
to the joy of the friends of Stanford University, 

Smith College has the largest Freshman class in 
her history — two hundred and sixty-five, and one hun- 
dred more are said to have been turned away. 

The reason for the change in military tactics, which 
consists mainly of the omission of carry arms, is 
caused by the fact that the new guns have no hammer 
by which to carry them. 

A traveling scholarship of $2000 has been founded 
at Columbia with the condition attached that the 
holder must spend two years abroad, most of which 
must be passed in Italy and Greece. 

UNCLE JOTHAM'S BOARDER. 
I've kep' summer boarders for years and allowed 

I knowed all the sorts that there be : 
But there come an old feller this season along, 

That turned out a beater for me. 
Whatever that feller was arter, I vow 

I hain't got the slightest idee. 

He had an old bait net of thin, rotten stuff 
That a minner could bite his way through ; 

But he never went fishin', at least in the way 
That fishermen gen'ally do ; 

But he carried that bait net wherever he went, 
The handle was j'inted in two. 

And the bottles and boxes that chap fetched along? 

Why, a doctor would never want more ; 
If they held pills and physic he'd got full enough 

To fit out a medicine store. 
And he'd got heeps of pins, dreffle lengthy and slim, 

Allers droppin' about on the floor. 

Well, true as I live, that old feller jest spent 

His hull days in loafin' about 
And pickin' up hoppers and roaches and flies, 

Not to use for his bait to ketch trout, 
But to kill and stick pins in and squint at and all ; 

He was crazy's a coot, th' aint no doubt. 



He'd see a poor miller a-flyin' along — 

The commonest, everyday kind — 
And he'd waddle on arter it, fat as he was, 

And foller up softly ahind, 
Till he'd flop that air bait net right over his head, 

And I'd laugh till nigh out of my mind. 

Why, he'd lay on the ground for an hour at a stretch 

And scratch in the dirt like a hen ; 
He'd scrape all the bark off the bushes and trees, 

And turn the stones over, and then 
He'd peek under logs, or he'd pry into holes ; 

I'm glad ther' ain't no more sech men ! 

My wife see a box in his bedroom, one day, 

Jest swarmin' with live caterpillars, 
He fed 'em on leaves off of all kinds of trees. 

The ellums and birches and willers ; 
And he'd got piles of boxes chock full to the top 

With crickets and bees and moth millers. 

I asked him, one tine, what his business might be, 

Of course I fust made some apology — 
He tried to explain, but sech awful big words ! 

Sort o' forren, outlandish and collegey, 
'S near's I can tell, 'stead of enterin' a trade, 

He was tryin' to jest enter mology. 

And Hannah, my wife, says she's heered o' sech things; 

She guesses his brain warn't so meller ; 
There's a thing they call Nat'ral Histerry, she says, 

And, whatever the folks there may tell her, 
Till it's settled she's wrong she'll jest hold that air man 

Was a Nat'ral Histerrical feller. 

— Annie Trumbull Slosson in Entomological News. 

IDLE THOUGHTS. 

I love to lie on summer days 
Beneath these shady bowers : 

And here forget all worldly ways 
By the precepts of the flowers. 

The birds sing only joy and gladness, 
Their merry hearts know naught of sadness 
E'en the pine tree's boughs are singing ; 
The village bells are gaily ringing. 
The colts are in the meadow prancing, 
The children in the hay are dancing ; 
The Iambs are frisking on the lea. 
And all the world is glad but me. 

Little brook so gaily flowing 
Down the hillside, through the mowing, 
Leaping, springing, babbling, prattling, 
O'er the mossy stone wall rattling, 
Would that you might take from me 
All my sorrows to the sea. 

— E. C. B in Brunonian. 



50 



AGGIE LIFE. 



CUPID VERSUS TERPSICHORE. 
Two persons were wandering side by side, 

The road was dusty — the wood was near — 
She held a bunch of the meadow's pride, 

He strove to make his meaning clear — 

"Shadow is better than burning sun, 

Moss is better than dust and sand. 
Cooling coves where the waters run — 

All these pleasures are close at hand." 

Twinkles in eyes she raised her head, 

Her hat swung idly on her arm — 
A dark little smile o'er her features sped 

Like a fleeting beam from a nearing storm ; 

" Moonlight z's better than shadow or shade, 

A balcony better than moss — 
Cooling coves where the waters run 
Are all very well for a little fun — 

But every moment I count as loss, 
Ages already it seems we've stayed ; 

There's a German to-night — and I'm to lead, 

The sun is setting — let's double our speed." 

— B. F. C, in Cornell Era. 

NOTICE. 
" The wind bloweth, 
The water floweth, 
The subscriber oweth, 
And the Lord knoweth 
That we are in need of our dues. 
So come a runnin', 
Ere we go gunnin'. 
This kind of dunnin' 
Gives us the blues." 

— Exchange. 
APROPOS. 
If Uncle Sam would build a barge, 

And sail her bottom up, 
And man her with a cross-eyed crew, 
I think we'd keep the cup. 

— Francis Dupont Ammen, in Lehigh Burr. 



This Space is Reserved for 
Legare's Livery Stable. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
11-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. M. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. h. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. M., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09. 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 A. M. 

Returning leave Worcester at 11.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 A. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 a. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 8.01, 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 11.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 1 1.46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 



E. 1ST. BROWX, D. D. S. 



N 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



. Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OP 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



STRINGS FOR VIOLIN, BANJO AID GUITAR 



Cusfynaif s ftmlt Store, 



iroitTUAjai'xoJsr. 



' i a i 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Fants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



scbe&sjleie's 

photographic studio. 

Society, Class anrl Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. J. SCHIL,L,AHE, 

108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

COAL AMD WOOD. 

THOMAS -C. DILLON, 

DEALER Ttt 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



sBILLIAIlD and reading parlo 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



GO TO- 



1S95. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC SID 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and Group (0o?k a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



E. K, BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SKS£S3Ssar:.^:s2s -zii-i'z ~^ii^ ?;^^^¥m^w ^m ?Ek^2m 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 






NORTHAMPTON". 



FINE CLOTHING 



E. & W. CQLL ARS_& CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



■\msmm3im 



SS^EffiKSzl^^ 



Buy tie Latest Farm Bacieij and late Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Fi 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. 
have a complete stork of spraying utensils, Paris Gi 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



irm- 
the 
We 

een, 



JUPERIDR^J 

.La-nd 
Holler 





OEEDEfIa 



WRITE foe 

"'■ "' m. 



110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and plantiug the same, free on application. 



:Q 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



.a-il^seust souse 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 



AVE HAVE PURE BRED 

rcheroD Horses aid Soutiii Shssp, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. V. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 



MASS, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TKUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 
PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERT HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $3.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

0. G. COUCH SION'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. SIDKJIfEOH, 1 



lC 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

a TO 12 A. Ts/L-, 1-30 TO 5 F. IVI. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



m. 



\A 



i. 



C-. 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PHOENIX ROW 



PRICES REASONABLE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LIKE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

EXJEEEE 0-003DS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Jg^Brjittirhtg done icJtile you wait,~g% 



£T 



3 MMENJX JRO'.t: 



;KIHS0N & GOEBTiri 



3BOAKX>II*J"0 



LiYery, Feed and Exchange Stable 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAK, 

okselior, Stationer and Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 
HAIR DRESSING ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONEO, 3ARBERS' SUPPLIES FCR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



3*9 
NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Druo's and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges (or Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

* Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, O. 33*. IPAIE^iVilSEg *&'3'„ 
Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

s-& satisfaction quaban teed. ss= 
Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge to and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 

S^SPECIAL RATES..^©§ 
Passenger to center, ---... iqc. 
Passenger to Aggie, ------. 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, - 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ---._. 25c. 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE, 



s mat m are Pieasefl le sbe 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 

IVHEQ 1/ Oil QfirlnnfiPM 

Blowers, Tailors, Batters, Fipleis. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

$£LCKBOm & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

NT'S MERINO DHD1 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



Iff. BLOEEETT & CO., 

Merchant Tailors 



■ AND DEALERS IN - 



READY-MADE GLOTHIPJG. 

We give you a watch worth §5.00 with Suits, Coals and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, S3 up. 

^"Repairing neatly done at short notice. «^gg 



Baa. Iff. BlGdgatt & Oh. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 






'^10 ^ 



FOUNTAIN I^NiS. 
Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 

,_ ^ j, Lenses,™ 

STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



-4-Botany supplies, uum Faper, Lenses, mmmm sups, at 



CHOICE COWFBCTIOMBMY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boyuton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 13, 1895. 



NO. 5 



■ f% i 



[ i iLi 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms S1.C0 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Fost Office as second-class maii matter. 
BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96, As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Aiumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY. '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute, 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 



Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until it 
ordered and arrears paid. 



Communications should 
discontinuance is 



§°c©nais. 



Competition for places on the editorial board of the 
Life has not been very brisk thus far and we would 
say to the members of the lower classes that : men 
will be chosen for their work that is handed to the 
Editor-in-Chief whether it appears in the Life or not. 
The competition is open to all, and every student con- 
tributing will receive impartial treatment and appoint- 
ments will be made on the character of the work 
submitted. 



We do not believe that the undergraduate, particu- 
larly the lower classmen, fully appreciate the opportu- 
nities afforded them in the College Library for intel- 
lectual culture. We have one of the best, if not the 
best, library connected with any Agricultural College 
in the United States and the student who fails to im- 
prove his opportunity during the four years' stay at 



College will have much to regret in after years. Of 
all places about College the library is the place for 
study. Even one's own room does not compare with 
it. There is something in the mere fact of having 
books about one which is wonderfully condusive to 
mental application. A kind of feeling which pervades 
the atmosphere with knowledge and learning, which 
sooths, and at the same time inspires. Let every 
one who would make the most of his leisure hours 
spend them in the College library. Here he will, if he 
but takes the pains to try, find some course of reading 
that wili be interesting and at the same time benefic- 
ial to him. Let every one who is making a speciality 
of any line of work supplement his work in the clsss 
room by reading in the library. In this way he will 
get the most and best results from his college course 
and go out into the world a better rounded man, bet- 
ter able to cope successfully with the difficulties he 
will meet with in the struggle for existence. 



As the time approaches when the pigskin must be 
laid away and the gridiron vacated for the winter we 
would speak a few words of advice to those, who for 
the last two months, have been developing their wind 
and muscle on the campus. As long as there is a 
football team on the campus hunting for a second 
eleven that is the place for exercise and in fact as 
long as the weather permits most of our athletics 
should be in the open air, but in a few weeks sports 
of this kind will be impossible and the question is are 
we going to make the best of what we have in the way 
of a gymnasium or are we going to sit all winter with 
our feet on the radiator and look for something better? 
It is only too true that the drill hall is not a perfect 
gymnasium ; that the apparatus contained therein is 
somewhat scanty and that we lack an instructor in 
this important line of college work, nevertheless, it 
would be possible to obtain very satisfactory results in 
the line of physical exercise and physical training if 



$2 



aGGlii J_irii. 



every man would take sufficient interest in the mat- 
ter to do a little individual work instead of a great 
deal of individual kicking. In years past our Athletic 
Association has done much to promote interest in this 
work and we doubt not that under its present able and 
efficient officers this year will be no exception to the 
rule. But this is not a matter that lies with the Ath- 
letic Association but with every man in College and it 
is the duty of every man to do something individually 
to help the cause along. We may not develop any 
record breakers with our limited numbers and our 
limited facilities, but we can develop men and what 
more than that could be expected or asked for even 
with a better of gymnasium. 



There is one fault and that a very important one in 
connection with the Reading Room which seems to 
be almost entirely overlooked by those in authority, 
and that is the lighting of the room. That a room 
otherwise so complete and perfect in its appointments, 
should be deficient, and so lamentably so, in this one 
quality is something that is far from right. The pres- 
ent number of lamps is insufficient to give satisfactory 
light and when one half of the lamps are out of fix 
at the same time it makes it practically impossible 
for one who has any regard for his eye-sight to in- 
dulge in reading after day-light has disappeared. A 
light of the dim religious order may be romantic 
and also involve less expense in the matter of 
electric light but it has a most serious disadvantage. 
The time of year has now come when artificial light 
is a necessity even in the afternoon. One thing is 
certain that unless the full number of lamps are in order, 
reading after the shades of night have fallen will be a 
practical impossibility. That we have among the 
student body men who would be so mean as to take a 
good lamp from the Reading Room and replace it 
with a worthless one it is hard to believe but it is nev- 
ertheless a fact and every honorable minded student 
should do his utmost to bring such offenders to jus- 
tice. When one is so selfish and dishonorable as to 
appropriate that which is intended for the common 
good for his individual interests he is not deserving of 
sympathy and should be shown no mercy. Let every 
student do his utmost to bring the offenders to justice 
and let those in charge see that the Reading Room 
is well lighted. 



FOOTBALL. 

Aggie '99, 38 ; Sunderland, 0. 

The freshmen defeated the Sunderland foot-ball 
team on the campus, Nov. 1 , in one of the best exhi- 
bitions of foot-ball ever presented by a freshman team. 
While it was evident from the start that the freshmen 
would win it was plain to be seen that they were play- 
ing against superior weight and against a team that 
would give them battle for every foot of the way. 

At precisely 3-45 referee Moore called play. Sun- 
derland punted the ball well down the field and got it 
on a fumble on '99's 40-yards line. After short gains 
it goes to '99 on a fumble. J. Canto gains 20 yards 
round right end, Gile 10 yards, Burrington 5 yards, 
Keenan 10 yards, and by steady gains Gile scores the 
first touchdown in five minutes after play began. 
Sastre fails at goal. Score, 4-0. 

Sunderland's ball on the kick off. Gile advances it 
to the 30-yard line. J. Canto makes a gain of 6 
yards through tackle, Sastre 5 yards through center, 
Gile 6 yards round left-end, Sunderland's ball on a 
fumble. Here the game was enlivened by fine tack- 
ling by J. Canto and Burrington and Shaw is forced to 
punt on third down. Sastre gets the ball and by a 
magnificent run of 90 yards makes the second touch- 
down of the game, Sastre kicks goal. Score, 10-0. 

Shaw punts the ball to Burrington on the 20-yard 
line and that player advances it 20 yards. Gile makes 
a gain of 5 yards through tackle, Keenan 20 yards 
round right end, J. Canto 6 yards through tackle, 
Keenan 10 yards through Sunderland's left tackle and 
J. Canto scores a touchdown. Sastre fails at goal. 
Score, 14-0. 

Again Shaw punts down the field to Canto, who fum- 
bles only to have Hooker recover it in time to make 
a gain of ten yards. Keenan is sent around right end 
for 15 yards, and a series of steady gains put the pig- 
skin on Sunderland's 20-yard line when time is called. 

'99 has the kick-off in the second half and Sastre 
punts to Dill, who advances it ten yards. The ball is 
given to '99 on downs. Gile is given the ball on the 
third down and six yards to gain and by magnificent 
interference and good head work is able to score a 
touchdown. Sastre' fails at goal. Score 1 8-0. 

Shaw kicks off to Burrington and by steady work 
the ball is brought up the field. Sastre punts near the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



53 



center of the field and Beaman gets the ball on Sun- 
derland's 15-yard line and Burrington on the next 
play is sent over the line for a touchdown. Sastre' 
fails at goal. Score, 22-0. 

Again Shaw punts to Burrington; J. Canto gains 
20 yards through tackle, Burrington 15 yards, Gile 20 
yards, Keenan 10 yards, and after a few minutes of 
steady work Gile makes his second touchdown of the 
game. Sastre' kicks goal. Score 28-0. 

Keenan gets the ball on Sunderland's kick off and 
advances it 10 yards. Gile goes round right-end for 
10 yards. Here the ball changes hands twice on fum- 
bles and finally to go to Sunderland who could only 
lose ground with it and it goes to '99 on downs. Sastre 
punts and Keenan gets the ball outside. After a few 
short gains, J. Canto is pushed over the line for a 
touchdown. Sastre' fails at goal. Score 32-0. 

Turner is immediately downed after receiving the 
kick off. Gile gains 25 yards round left end. Sastre 
punts and the ball goes to Sunderland who soon lose 
it on downs. Here the ball is fumbled and Sastre gets 
it in time to score his second touchdown after a beau- 
tiful run of 40 yards. Sastre kicks goal. Score, 38-0. 

Shaw punts to J. Canto who is downed without 
gain. Sastre' gains 20 yards, Gile 20 more and Bur- 
rington places it on Sunderland's 10-yard line by a 
sprint of 50 yards. Canto fails to make a touchdown 
on the next play and time is called with the ball on 
Sunderland's 10-yard line. Score, 38-0. 

The line up : — 

Aggie '99. Sunderland. 



Keenan, 1. e. 
Hooker, 1. t. 
Beaman, I. g. 
Dutcher, 
Holt, r. g. 
Turner, r. t. 
Gile, r. e. 
Y. Canto, 
J. Canto, 
J. C. Burrington 
C. Sastre' , 



center, 



quarter-back, 
half-back, 
full-back, 
Umpire — Mr. Warden '98. Referee- 



r. e. Clark 

r. t. Monyhan 

r. g. Wilder 

Darling 

1. g. Callahan 

I. t, W.Woodbury 

1. e. H. Woodbury 

Hawks 

Dill 

Pomeroy 



-Mr. Moore '96. 
Linesmen — Wright and Harper. Time — two 20-minute halves, 
Touchdowns — Sastre 2, J. Canto 2, J. C. Burrington 2, Gile 
2. Score, 53-0. 

Aggie '99, 14 ; Hopkins, 0. 

Again '99 proved her ability to play good foot-ball 
by defeating Hopkins on the campus in a game char- 
acterized by brilliant offensive work and by fine tack- 



ling. It is to be regretted that darkness prevented the 
playing of the second half as we believe the freshmen 
would have rolled up a big score against the Hopkins' 
men if it had been played. 

Gile wins the toss and chose the wind. Barry 
punts to J. Canto who advanced the ball 15 yards, 
Gile carries it through tackle for 5 yards, Burrington 
round end for 7 yards, Keenan 5 yards, and Gile puts 
it near Hopkins' goal by a gain of 30 yards through 
tackle. By steady work, Hopkins fighting every inch, 
the ball is within one yard of Hopkins' goal when it is 
fumbled and Keenan recovers it and makes the first 
touchdown of the game. Sastre kicks goal. Score 6-0 

Gile receives the kick off and works the pigskin up 
the field for 10 yards. Burrington gets round end for 
10 yards. At this point of the game Cahill and God- 
frey make fine tackles and prevent gains. Gile gets 
the ball on the third down and gains 30 yards, M. 
Barry makes the finest tackle of the game and downs 
Burrington behind the line. Sastre' bucks the center 
for 12 yards and Gile goes through for 10 yards more. 
Hopkins gets the ball on a fumble but is unable to gain 
and the ball goes to '99, and Burrington goes through 
tackle for a touchdown. Sastre fails at goal. Score, 
10-0. 

J. G. Barry kicks to Burrington who carries the ball 
into Hopkins' territory by a gain of 50 yards. Gains 
by Gile and Canto work the ball close to Hopkins' 20- 
yard line and Sastre' breaks through center and makes 
a touchdown Sastre' fails at goal. Score, 14-0. 

Hopkins' kick off and Gile is downed after making 
a short gain on receiving the ball. Gains by Keenan, 
Burrington and Sastre place the ball on Hopkins' 35- 
yard line when time is called. 

The line up : — 

Aggie '99. Hopkins. 

Keenan, 1. e. r. e. Cahill 

Hooker, 1. t. r. t. O'Neil 

Beaman, 1, g. r. g. Smith 

Dutcher, center, Steele 

Holt, r. g. 1. g. Reynolds 

Turner, r. t. 1. t. J. Barry 

Gile, r. e. (capt.) 1. e. M. Earry 

Y. Canto, quarter-back, Watts 

J. C. Burrington, half-backs, £ or ^ n 

J. Canto, Keach 

C. Sastre", full-back, J. C. Barry 

Umpire — Mr. Johnson, Hopkins. Referee — Mr. Leamy, 
M.A. C. Linesmen — Emrich and Worden. Time — One 20- 
minuie half. Touchdowns — Keenan, C. Sastre. J. C. Bur- 
rington. Score, 14-0. 



54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



©svfrsl 



ORNITHOLOGICAL COLLECTION OF AGGAIS- 

SIZ MUSEUM AT HARVARD CAMBRIDGE. 

What a grand sight meets one's eyes as he passes 
through the halls and corridors of this museum, where 
the animal kingdom from man down to the lowest 
protozoa have been preserved and classified in a most 
wonderful manner. Here if anywhere is the theory 
of evolution demonstrated in a most wonderful way ; 
and here is one impressed with the wide range cf the 
brute creation ; hundreds and perhaps thousands of 
specimens. 

Passing through the various corridors we enter the 
left wing of the building. Here on the second and 
third floors is the Ornithological division. Passing 
through the main door we are confronted 
on all sides by cases of birds ; some with plumage 
radient with gay colors like the Scarlet Ibes of the 
Nile, while others in somber grey as the Cat Bird of 
North America. 

The object that seems to attract us from the first is 
a large case in the middle of this room in which is 
placed the skeleton of the Great Moa, a native bird of 
New Zealand. This bird is a study in itself, measuring 
ten feet in height and having in general the form of 
the present Ostrich of the old world. Its skeleton 
formed from such huge bones would seem to defy the 
bullet of any rifle ; its legs formed from bones so large, 
so long would seem to be in themselves the embodi- 
ment of lightning speed. 

When did this bird live and its habits, of these facts 
we are ignorant ; all we can say or think is it must have 
been a wonderful animal and lived in a wonderful age. 
To be sure we have the legends that have been handed 
down to the bushmen of New Zealand how this bird 
would keep an army at bay, and how it possessed 
strength super-human. 

In the case that stands by the side of the one we 
have just been examining is the skeleton of the Great 
Auk (Alca impumis), now supposed to be extinct, 
although it has been reported to have been seen by 
some Esquimaux in the northern limits of the Artie 
sea. 

It has the form of the present Puffin ; stands erect 
walking on its webbed feet and provided with rudimen- 



tary wings. Its head is shaped like the duck but is 
several times larger. Very unlike the Moa it has 
very short legs but enormous webbed feet showing that 
it was a water bird and not of migratory habits. 

Leaving these specimens of two very ancient birds 
let us pass around the room and notice the contents 
of the side cases. First comes the Ostrich a mere 
pigmy beside the Moa ; then the birds of prey as the 
Condor and Vulture of the Andes, the American 
Eagle of the Rockies, and Falcons of Europe, the 
smaller birds as ducks, cranes, hawks and owls of 
various countries. The songsters of home and abroad, 
the beautiful hummingbirds of Central America whose 
colors defy imitations, brilliant in the tinges of green, 
red and gold, they seem as mere insects, created for 
admiration only to perish in a day. 

Leaving these collections with our mind almost 
enchanted by the beautiful sights of nature we pass 
through a short hall into another room devoted to the 
same subject but having a more scientific bearing 
upon it. Here is shown in a clear way the variation 
of colors in the same kind of bird. The groups are 
placed in hollows in the wall and then glassed over 
making a very unique affair. 

The most striking example of all is in the case of 
the Blue Heron. There are sixteen birds in this 
group all of a different color running from a pure white 
or pie white to a dark slate. This gradation is due to 
the age and time in which the bird was taken also 
whether male or female. 

In the case of a Blue Jay the colors graduate 
from a brilliant blue to a dark olive brown being most 
brilliant in early spring and late autumn. The Scarlet 
Tanager and Meadow Lark are also very striking, being 
of brilliant plumage at certain seasons and very un- 
attractive at others. There are also represented the 
birds of Europe which never change in plumage the 
year around, male and female, young and adult always 
the same. This branch of Ornithology known as the 
coloration of birds is of great service in the work of 
identification. 

Although we have passed over a large amount of 
ground and have busied our eyes v/ith the wonderful 
sights, we have not by any means taken in the entire 
subject for to do that it would take a volume, but there 
is one thing which we have done a»d that is we have 
been taught a lesson in natural history and one that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



we should never forget. The wonders of creation 
have been shown us and he who does not stop to 
ponder on the questions of the power which created all 
these things is surely never to be moved to thought. 



THE ARMENIAN OUTRAGES. 

Situated in the southwestern part of Asia, bounded 
by the Russian frontier on the north, by Persia on the 
east, by the Mesopotamian plain on the south, and by 
Asia Minor on the west, is a large, quadrangular plat- 
teau, sixty thousand square miles in extent. Its sur- 
face is rough and uneven, consisting of hills, valleys 
and plains, at a mean elevation of some five thou- 
sand feet above sea-level, broken and shut in by 
bristling peaks and mountain ranges. Its scenery is 
wild and grand. The climate is temperate, the at- 
mosphere clear and invigorating. Such is the coun- 
try of late so prominent in the eyes of all the world, 
the country whose name is on the tongue of all people, 
Armenia. 

In this region, not wholly unlike our own beloved 
New England, for three thousand years has lived a 
race that has furnished to the world many notable and 
honored names. For three thousand years Armenia 
has been crossed and devastated by hostile armies 
and migrating hordes, She has been the prey of 
Nebuchadnezzar, Xerxes and Alexander ; of Romans, 
Persians, Saracens, Crusaders, and Turks ; of Russians 
and Kurds : yet in spite of this record of desolation 
the Christian church has been founded and main- 
tained ; and for sixteen hundred years has been the 
one rallying point and source of strength to the Arme- 
nian people. They enjoy the distinction of being the 
first race after the Jews to accept Christianity; but 
such is their location and circumstances that they 
have lost in the struggle for supremacy and at the 
present time are little better than slaves to their Turk- 
ish and Kurdish masters. 

The Armenians are a bright, practical, industrious 
and moral people, peaceable and yet brave in dispo- 
sition. But such has been the oppression of their 
Turkish rulers that they are reduced to a low degree 
of culture, to penury and want. Their spirit is broken, 
they are held as in a vice, not daring to writhe, or cry 
out, for fear of greater wrongs. Such has been their 
fate ; so that to-day we find them the most wretched 
and oppressed people on the face of God's broad 
earth. 



It is hard for us, Americans, to realize the condi- 
tions under which the Armenians endure a living 
death. Freedom and Liberty, two of the dearest words 
of the human tongue, are prohibited in the vocabulary 
of Turkish subjects. Whole passages of the Bible are 
stricken out ; all other Christian publications are pro- 
hibited, or are under rigorous censorship. To such 
an extent does his Majesty, the Sultan, control the 
press of his own country that he thinks that he can 
extend his power to America, even. Not long ago he 
had the unlimited nerve to send a message to Presi- 
dent Cleveland, requesting him to stop the discussion 
of the Armenian question in American newspapers ! 
Did you ever hear of such bigotry, such effrontery ? 
And this in almost the beginning of the twentieth 
century ! 

We are reluctant to admit it, yet the question of 
religion comes into the Armenian problem. The 
Mohammedans are deadly enemies of Christianity 
and have sworn to see the Koran supplant the Bible. 
The Sultan is the head of the Islam faith, Armenia 
is a Christian country. Hence it is that for years 
unparalleled cruelty and outrage have been perpe- 
trated on her defenceless people. 

During the summer of last year ( 1 894) we find 
Armenia infested with tax-collectors, little if any bet- 
ter than robbers, having orders from the Sultan to 
collect taxes. This they do taking by force every- 
thing they can obtain, — grain, cattle and horses, leav- 
ing the peasants without the necessary means of sub- 
sistence. They remonstrate ; and daring to cry out 
are set upon by savage and brutal armies, and, 
unarmed and defenceless, are swept by thousands 
from the earth. 

The name of Sassoun will live forever, a foul blot 
on the page of Turkish history, yet this is only one of 
many outrages. 

Little did the world outside the Musselman Em- 
pire dream of that terrible massacre until more than 
three months after its perpetration. Little did we 
suppose that ten thousand helpless men, women and 
children had been mercilessly slaughtered and sub- 
jected to treatment unspeakable in its devilish 
malignity. 

Think of it! Ten thousand innocent people killed 
in cold blood! Strong men hacked in pieces as they 
knelt at the feet of merciless savages, suing for the 



56 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lives of their wives and children! Young men piled 
with alternate layers of dry wood, saturated with kero- 
sene and burned to a horrible death! Weak, defence- 
less women outraged by a brutal soldiery and then 
foully butchered! Little children snatched from their 
mother's arms and torn limb from limb before their 
very eyes, or carried aloft on the spears and bayonets 
of the vile, blood-thirsty, ruffians! 

Christian churches made pens of corruption and 
scenes of the most foul and dastardly of crimes, the 
ravishing and slaughter of scores of helpless women, 
their blood flowing in streams from the church doors! 

Can we hear of these and numberless other out- 
rages without our blood boiling in our veins? Can we 
listen to such tales of horror without our hearts swell- 
ing with a desire to see quick and eternal justice ac- 
complished? Must we sit calmly by and say no word 
to help and encourage our distressed and downtrodden 
brothers? 

For centuries Armenia has upheld Christianity in 
the face of every opposition. For centuries she kept 
alive the spark of civilization that had grown dim in 
the conflicts of past ages. Now shall she call on us 
in vain for such succor as we are able to give? 

Although these unhappy people are on the opposite 
side of the world from us, yet must we remember that 
we are brothers, children of one Great God. Freely 
we have received, freely we must give. 



Y. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

The week of prayer for colleges is observed by the 
Y. M. C. A. by meetings each night in the week. The 
subjects are as follows : 
Monday — " Prayer for Nations and Rulers." 
Tuesday — " Prayer for Christians and Wandering." 
Wednesday — "Prayer for Christian Organizations and 

Institutions." 
Thursday — " Co-operation in a Conflict." 
Friday — " Prayer for Missions and Missionaries." 



DECEIT. 

The room was warm, she swooned away, 

She. fainted on his arm ; 
Ten years from then, alas! He knew 

She feinted just to charm. 

—H. in Williams Weekly. 



oHeg? pio-fcfs 



—Hello, Central ! 

— The Seniors are now taking military law under 
Lieut. Dickinson. 

— Aredis Adjimian of Harpoot, Asia Minor, has 
entered the Sophomore class. 

— E. H. Sharpe and E. A. Perry 1st year, are 
members of the D. G. K. fraternity. 

— The week of prayer for colleges is observed by 
the Y. M. C. A. in the customary manner. 

— W. E. Hinds of Townsend has entered the 
1st year class, but expects to change into '99 at the 
close of the term. 

— The Senior entomological division passed a very 
pleasant evening at the home of Prof, and Mrs. C. H. 
Fernald, on Friday, Nov. 8. 

— On Saturday Nov. 9, Prof. Maynard visited and 
examined the greenhouses of South Sudbury in which 
carnation rust is doing considerable damage. 

— The Senior division in Agriculture report a very 
interesting course on that subject. At present they 
are considering the various breeds of livestock. 

— Pres. H. H. Goodell delivered a lecture at New 
Salem Thursday evening, Nov. 7th on " The Agricul- 
ture of the Channel Islands, Jersey and Guernsey." 

— At a meeting of the faculty held Thursday, Oct. 
31st, it was voted " That such students as are examined 
be required to attain the standard of 65 in the term 
examinations." 

— The following men have been elected members 
of the college whist club: C. A. King, '97, H. F. 
Allen '97, G. F. Keenan, '99, E. H. Sharpe, 1st year, 
A. C. Courtney, 2d year. 

— The program for to-night at the Union Lecture 
Course is an address by Rev. George C. Lorimer D. 
D. of Tremont Temple, Boston, on '■ Robert Burns, 
or, The Poet of the People." 

— The Seniors and 2d year men will take Dairying 
during the winter term. Prof. Brooks is perfecting 
plans to be laid before the trustees, whereby a short 
winter course in Dairying may be offered, of a similar 
character to the Dairy school at the Michigan Agri- 
cultural college. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



57 



— The next Senior debate comes on Friday, Nov. 
15th; subject, "Are trade unions a benefit to the 
laboring classes ?" Affirmative, Burringtonand Deluce. 
Negative, Marshall and Moore. 

— We are pleased that the college, in response to 
our repeated suggestions, has put street lights between 
North college and the boarding house. It was a much 
needed improvement and is fully appreciated. 

— Early in the season B. K. Jones, '96, was quite 
badly injured in the kidneys while on football practice. 
He still suffers considerably from his injury and is not 
in proper condition to attend to his college duties. 

— Freshmen 38, Sunderland high school, 0. Fresh- 
men 14, Hopkins Academy, ; '99 has developed a 
wonderfully strong team considering the amount of 
material it had. V/e congratulate them on their 
victories. 

— By invitation of Pres't Goodell, the members of 
the Universalist church will attend the service at the 
chapel, next Sunday morning, when Rev. Calvin 
Stebbins of Worcester, the noted Unitarian Divine, 
will occupy the pulpit. 

— In response to a call for help from one of our 
alumni, a collection was taken up after chapel to aid 
in supplying criminals with the word of God, and in 
guiding and directing their efforts towards a better life 
after liberation. This is certainly a noble work and 
the generosity of the students showed their apprecia- 
tion of its merits. 

— Some college students have a peculiar code of 
morals which allows them to perform certain contempt- 
ible acts without a pang of conscience. "Swiping," 
interpreted into plain English means stealing, but a 
number of students appear not to regard it as such. 
A man who " swipes " is simply a thief. No college 
slang can hide its true nature. 

— The gubernatorial contest received the usual 
amount of support from college orators and sporting 
men, both republicans and democrats, with odds 
decidedly in favor of the former. After the election 
one solitary representative of triumphant democracy 
with coat and vest turned inside out, was observed to 
plod his weary way around the square, wheeling before 
him the shrewder partner of the bet, and followed by a 
hooting yelling crowd of urchins. That is life, Every- 
body kicks a man when he is down. 



— Prof. A. H. Stone, '80, who has been at the head 
of the Agricultural department at Tougaloo, Miss,, 
for a number of years, has come here to take a post- 
graduate course in Agriculture. It is also expected 
that A. H. Kirkland, '94 and D. C. Potter, '95 will 
return for post-graduate courses by the first of next 
term, the former in Entomology, and the latter in 
Agriculture. 

— The football team has disbanded after a season 
of discouragement and disappointment, Out of six 
games played we have won but one, although we still 
claim the Williston game was rightly ours. We see 
no outlook for the future but a repetition of this year's 
disaster. With so few men to pick from, we cannot 
expect to develop a team that will uphold the high 
standard which our teams have hitherto maintained. 
But let us make the best of our misfortune. Aggie's 
luck will turn some day. It cannot be otherwise. A 
college with our advantages cannot fail for lack of 
students. 

— The University of Virginia has lately had the 
great misfortune to lose by fire all her principal build- 
ings, including dormitories and library. In behalf of the 
college, Pres. Goodell has sent to the University from 
the college library, thirty valuable volumes of scientific 
works, as a contribution towards a new library at the 
University. A committee of six, one representative 
from each class was also appointed to draw up resolu- 
tious and forward to the students of the University, 
expressing the sympathy of the college in their loss 
and offering any assistance which may be within our 
power. 

— Owing to the financial and industrial depression 
during the last two years it has been considered inad- 
visable to present the claims of our athletic field 
before the alumni, and to ask for their contribution 
and support. But the time has now come when this 
matter should be pushed, and every effort made during 
the coming year to secure the necessary funds with 
which to build and equip a suitable athletic field. 
Prof. Brooks, who has the matter in charge, proposes 
to form a corporation under the statutes of the state, 
composed of alumni living in or near Boston for 
greater convenience, and having for its sole object the 
advancement to a successful culmination of those 
interests pertaining to a college athletic field. We 



58 



AGGIE LIFE. 



hope to see the students and alumni subscribe gener- 
ously to this plan. It would certainly prove a great 
stimulus in athletic matters, which of late, have been 
sadly slighted. 

— There appeared in the last issue of Aggie Life an 
article from Prof. C. S. Plumb, '82, commenting upon 
the growth of the college and upon the exceptional 
advantages which the students now enjoy in compari- 
son with those of former years. And yet there are 
men in college who can find no words too vile with 
which to comment upon their Alma Mater ; no lan- 
guage too abusive with which to discuss the merits of 
professors and the work carried on in the various 
departments. To such men we wish to present a few 
plain facts. The only true representatives of a college 
are its alumni, the men who have graduated from its 
halls and who have gone forth to meet the duties of 
life and labor, These alone are the true index to the 
real strength and influence of a college. Let us look 
at our alumni. What are they doing ? Are they 
creditable or not ? We challenge any college in the 
country with our advantages, our equipment and our 
numbers, to show a list of alumni who have attained 
greater success by persistent individual effort than 
have ours ; to show a greater number of workers in 
the field of literature and science ; to show more 
men actually contributing to and participating in the 
advancement of knowledge and civilization. We are 
proud of our alumni. They have establishing a repu- 
tation for the college which is without blemish. We 
will compare them with the graduates of any other 
college without shame. These are the men who did 
not neglect their opportunities while at college ; who 
worked and studied, and made the most of the few 
advantages and privileges which characterized the 
earlier days of the college, If we could turn out such 
men as these ten years ago what can we expect from 
the graduates of to-day with all the advantages and 
improvements by which he is benefited ; with the 
broadened horizon of thought and investigation which 
has been opened to his view. We can at least expect 
him to be loyal to the college and do everything in his 
power to advance its interests but surely we have a 
right to expect that he will also be true to himself and 
will improve to best advantage the grand opportunity 
here offered for making something of himself. Let 
us hear no more of these college blues, this kicking 



against the " Institute." You cannot get something for 
nothing. You can get no benefit from your college 
course unless you make an effort. Your better judge- 
ment will recognize the truth of these facts, and your 
own interests demand their immediate application. 



V 



es and (ommen^|. 



Once more we take up our tale of woe regarding 
the walk to the College Boarding House. Semi-an- 
nually the Life has called the attention of the College 
authorities to the need of a walk from North College 
to the Boarding House, and we are not going to let 
the matter drop until there is something done about 
it. The need of such an improvement is evident to 
those who take their meals at the Club House, and if 
any of those persons who have such matters in charge 
would only have the pleasure of walking over to break- 
fast some rainy morning, through the mud and slush, 
which he finds in the way, he also, would be convinced 
of the need of at least a plank or two, from which the 
unwary might fall. 

* 

* * 

We are much disappointed in not having a foot-ball 

game between the Sophomore and Freshman classes 
this year. It seems that the wily Sophs, were fearful 
of defeat and by wise statesmanship avoided a con- 
flict. This year the Freshmen exceeded in ferocity 
and skill all former classes and gave promise to make 
the Sophs, no end of trouble. But '98 was not to be 
taken in that way and wisely declined to play. We 
believe that the Sophomores should win from the 
Freshmen in these class contests, because, it would 
be ignominy unbearable if '99 should defeat '98. As 
we said before, there is no game. It is well. 

* 

* * 

We have given more space to the freshman foot- 
ball than such a subject would, perhaps, warrant, but 
I we have become so accustomed to writing up the de- 
! feats which are served up to us that our sporting edi- 
tor is inclined to elaborate on victory. Nevertheless, 
it is a good thing and deserves to be " pushed along." 
There is material in the Freshman and First Year 
classes which will in the near future turn the tables on 
i our opponents and place our athletics on a higher 
plane. Let the good work go on. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



59 



To the Alumni, Students, and Friends of the 
College : 

The Ninety-seven Index Board takes pleasure in 
announcing to the college and public, that the twenty- 
seventh volume of the Index is now complete, and will 
be placed on sale at the office of the business manager 
on Thursday Dec. 12th. 

The present volume of the Index is the largest ever 
published, containing 252 pages, or 36 more pages 
than the '96 Index. The book will be printed by a 
house, that has a universal reputation, having been 
awarded the first prize for fine printing at the World's 
Columbian Exposition, held at Chicago. This same 
house prints the college annual for Harvard college, 
Wellesley college, Mass. Institute of Technology and 
other large educational institutions. The book is far 
in advance of any previous volume, it being compiled 
at nearly double the expense of any work of our pred- 
ecessors. The board of editors have worked hard and 
faithfully and therefore we are enabled to have the 
book ready for the alumni at an earlier date than ever 
before. It is bound in rich brown silk and has a 
beautiful design stamped in gold on the cover, this 
representing the class colors, which are brown and 
gold. A new style of type will be used throughout the 
book, and it will be printed on the best of enameled 
paper. The book will contain more illustrations than 
any previous Index. The original artistic work is far 
superior to the work that has been published in the 
past. 

The literary features of the book will be a gratifica- 
tion to all those who are interested in the literary 
advancement of the college. The number of literary 
articles in the book will be greater than heretofore. 

The alumni list is the largest, most complete and 
correct ever published. We have been very fortunate 
in securing a man for this department, who has taken 
the utmost care in arranging and compiling the names 
of the alumni. The class histories this year are 
exceptionally good, some of them being a good 
example of the literary ability of the class historians. 

The humorous side of college life has not been 
neglected, and we feel that you will all be interested 
in reading some of these articles. 

The book furnishes much more interesting and 
useful information than can be found in any other 



publication. It contains accurate statistics of the 
college, college records, board of trustees, university 
council, faculty, etc.; list of Batallion organizations, 
class and society lists. Half tone pictures of the 
athletic teams and the scores and dates of games 
played. 

The general features of the work must speak for 
itself when seen. The work of the Board has been 
done with a view to improve the already high standard 
attained by the '96 Index, and we believe that we 
have fulfilled the duty intrusted to us faithfully, con- 
scientiously and with credit to the college and to the 
class we represent. 

We trust that the alumni will do their duty and buy 
at least one copy of the boo!:, for the many pleasant 
associations which it recalls, and also to help out the 
Junior class at college. 

Thanking all those who have done all in their power, 
and especially the advertisers, to make the book a 
success. 

We are sincerely yours, 

The '97 Index Board. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

A portrait of Lord Jeffrey Amherst, from whom the 
town of Amherst was named, has been presented to 
the library by Prof. Herbert B. Adams, of Johns 
Hopkins University. 

The Academy Song Book. By Levermore & Red- 
dall. This volume of songs is intended for use in 
schools and colleges. Among the college songs are 
many of the best of the great English school, besides 
the pick of our own college songs. 

Bird Life. Dr. A. E. Brehm. This volume con- 
sists of a history of the bird, its structure and habits, 
together with sketches of fifty different species. The 
author is a famous German traveler and naturalist. 

Early Printing in America. Houghton. The prin- 
ciple part of this little book consists of an address 
delivered before the Vermont Historical Society, 
treating of the introduction of the art of printing into 
this country, and of the struggles of the early printers. 



It was half and half at Bates this year, as thirty- 
nine young men and thirty-nine young ladies made up 
the entering class. 



6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lumm. 



Alumni and students are requested to contribute to 
these columns 

'80. — Prof. A. H. Stone, Head of Dept. of Agri- 
culture at Tongaloo, Miss., is here taking a post-grad- 
uate course in Agriculture. 

'93. — Born, on October 27th, a daughter. Elizabeth 
Alice, to Dr. and Mrs. H. D. Clark, at Milford, Mass. 

'94. — E. L. Boardman and G. E. Smith visited 
college last week. 

'94. — C. L. Brown was in town Sunday. 

'94. — The address of W. L. Sanderson is 34 South 
Market St., Boston, Mass. with W. W. Rawson & Co. 

'95. — W. L. Morse is at work with the city engi- 
neer of Brockton, Mass. His address is 35 Clifton 
Ave., Brockton, Mass. 



^C^-^^g^S' 



The Harvard News has suspended publication 
through lack of financial support. For over a year it 
has had an exciting struggle for popularity with the 
Harvard Crimson, Last year it was pretty fairly suc- 
cesful, but this year it lost its hold, and, it is said, had 
less than one hundred subscribers, while the Crimson 
had close to 1000. The Crimson people were more 
than delighted when they heard the news, for they 
have now no competitor in the field, and last evening 
they had a jollification to which were invited all past 
members of the paper's staff who could be gathered 
in such short notice. The merriment was of the 
heartiest kind, and the editors enjoyed their fun well 
along toward midnight, receiving their friends in their 
fine new offices on Massachusetts Avenue. The 
universal toast of the evening was, "No News is Good 
New." — Williams Weekly. 

A very pretty trophy is to be presented to last year's 
champion ball nine at Yale. It is to consist of a 
golden belt, buckled in a circle, about the size of a 
nickle, and containing a golden baseball pierced with 
a bat. Upon the rim of the belt is inscribed, "Base- 
ball championship, won by Yale," and upon the other 
side the individual's name. It can be attached to a 
watch chain. 



The following is a list of dates of founding of the 
oldest colleges in the United States : Harvard, 1636; 
Yale, 1700; Princeton, 1746; University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1749; Columbia, 1754; Brown, 1764; Dart- 
mouth, 1769; Rutgers, 1770. 

It has been arranged to admit high school graduates 
at the University of Chicago without examination. 

Harvard is considering the idea of having only three 
grades of marking — passed with honor, passed and 
failed. 

The subject of the Yale-Princeton debate is "Re- 
solved, That in all matters of State Legislature of a 
general character, a system of referendum should be 
established similar to that now in Switzerland." 

The West Point eleven practice at 6 o'clock in the 
morning. 

Princeton has an exhibit at the Atlanta exhibition. 
The University of Michigan will have about 3000 
students this year. 

The largest football scores on record were made as 
follows: Harvard against Exeter, in 1886, 123-0; 
Yale against Wesleyan, in 1886, 136-0; Princeton 
against Lafayette, in 1884, 140-0. 

TRANSLATION FROM THE GERMAN. 
How harshly for mankind ordained it seemeth 

That with the roses thorns must also grow, 
And what the sad heart longeth for and dreameth, 

Should have an end, and parting undergo. 
In thy sweet eyes I once have read confessing, 

A gleam of love and joy came thence to me : — 
God keep thee, love ! — it was too dear a blessing! 
God keep thee, love ! — such bliss could never be ! 

Grief, envy, hate, on me have spent their powers, 

A weary wanderer, sad and tempest-tried ; 
I dreamed of quiet then, and peaceful hours, 

Led by the v/ay that brought me to thy side. 
In thine embrace 1 would have joyed possessing, 

And gratefully have given my life to thee : 
God keep thee, love I — it was too dear a blessing! 

God keep thee, love ! — such bliss could never be ! 

The clouds drive by, the wind through branches howling. 

A rainstorm over field and forest flies; 
For our farewell the fitting weather, scowling. 

Dark as the sky the world before me lies. 
But be the future pleasing or distressing, 

Thou slender maid, in truth I think on thee : — 
God keep thee, love ! — it was too dear a blessing! 

God keep thee, love ! — such bliss could never be ! 

— Harvard Advocate, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



61 



AUTUMN. 

The Autumn fell on all the manifold 

Fair things of Summer, and with icy hand 
On every side made desolate the land, 
And flung his random torch on wood and wold 
Till everywhere the trees in red and gold 

Burnt skyward ; and the far off hills did stand 
Vague in the purple smoke, while still he fanned 
The flame, and still the mysty reek uprolied — 
Then all the leaves dropped down like coals of fire 
And all the wild flowers save late golden rod 
And asters died ; and birds forgot to sing. 
But in my heart there stirred a new desire 

Like faint first life that reaches out to God. 
It was the hope and promise of the Spring. 

— Q. E. D. , in the University Cynic. 
MUSIC. 
When lowly bowed before the altar rail 
We hear through incense-laden air 
In clear notes falling as from angel choir 
The Sanctus mingling with our prayer, 
Can we then doubt there is a God above, 
A pitying father, merciful through love ? 

Or when upborne on mighty organ tones 

A thousand voices grandly swell 

In praise of fatherland and heroes' deeds, 

Till answering hills the chorus tell, 

What son to country loyal does not feel 

The quickening pulse, the thrill of patriotic zeal ? 

music, who dost sway our yielding hearts 

With every varying mood of thine, 

Now gay, now sad, now yearning for days gone, 

Bewitched by thee, 'neath spell divine, 

So sweet our thraldom whom thy bonds enchain 

We'd ne'er our freedom more regain. 

—Jeff in Univ. Cynic. 
PARTING. 
A kiss and a touch of the hand, 

" Farewell," whispered tender and low 
A last long lingering look 

And she's gone. The sunset glow 

Shines on my cheek, but my heart 

Lies pale and frozen as snow ; 
The house on the hill is shrouded in mist 
And wandering seaward I go. 

— P. M., in Brunonian. 
IT WAS, AND IT WASN'T. 
Two medics sauntered peaceably 
For more than twenty blocks ; 
And though this was no paradox, 
It was a pair o' docs. 

— H. in Williams Weekly. 



LINES. 
Life is but a flowing river 

Ever moving toward the sea, 
Bordered by the banks of vision, 

Flowing to Eternity. 

At its source a tiny streamlet. 

Scarcely seen by passers-by, 
Later, moving mighty mill wheels — 

Motive force of industry. 

Now it nears sin's turbid whirlpool. 

From its finding no release 
Till it glides in liquid lustre 

To some tranquil pool of peace. 

Now in waters deep with sorrow 

Overhung with shades of gloom, 
Now in shallow basins babbling, 

Laughing at impending doom. 

Offtimes chilled with harsh exposure, 

Oft encased in icy crust, 
Yet again reflecting beauties 

Of a God in whom we trust. 

Thus may we, on life's stream drifting, 

As its mirrored surface be, 
Just reflecting God's bright visions 

In a frame of purity. 

— C. W. T. in Brunonian. 

DREAMINGS. 
A lover lounged in his easy chair 

And dreamily smoked his pipe 
And he thought of a halo of golden hair 

And lips like cherries ripe, 

And he seemed to see in the curling smoke 

A life of wedded bliss 
And he heard again the words she spoke 

And felt again her kiss. 

# * * H # 

A maiden lay on her dainty couch 

And murmered dreamily, 
"Oh dear! this place is very slow, 
I've bagged no more than three." 

— Williams Weekly. 

SATISFIED. 
There was a sign upon a fence — 

That sign was " Paint,'" 
And every mortal that went by, 

Sinner and saint, 
Put out a finger, touched the fence — 

And onward sped, 
And as they wiped their finger tips — 

"It is," they said. 

— Exchange. 



62 



AG' 



E L,I3 



FOUR TO NOTHING. 

My text — 
None but the brave deserve the fair. 

I was not brave — 

I knew i*. too — 

At least I knew 
While she stood near, so debonair 

And talked to me 

Of foot-ball, who 

Was captain, coach and all of that, 
What games we'd won, 
How soon would come 
Thanksgiving Day 
And its great game ! 

A head below me, she 
Her upturned face 
Of laughing grace 

Dared me to think ! 
Shall I kiss her ? 
Shall I kiss her ? 
No one by ! 

My thoughts — Who said she read, 

Though quick she said : 
"Did you ever make a touchdown ? " 

(And no one by ! ) 
•'No, but 1 think I'll try." 
The rest 
Ycu guess. 
—A. E. 

THE DIFFERENCE. 
In olden times the business man 

His letter thus began : 
"Respected sir, to write a line 

I take my pen in hand." 

But in modern times 'tis vastly chang 

And this is what we see : 
"To write to you, I take, dear sir, 

My typewriter on my knee." 



Dunn in Bi unonian. 



-Dai tmouth Lit. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 



ery , He 



ana 



Special attention given to barge and party -work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 
Telephone No. 164. 

Pleasant Street, ... Amherst, Mass. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at '.he Library from 1 1 to 
1 1-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at t v e Bat?.-;c Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 3 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. m. and frcm 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be ov.en frcm S-45 A. it. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodel!. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. t.i. oa Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



R. A 3 . TIME TABLE. 
Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 
Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. M., Sundays 
6.10. 



:.45 



1.30, 4.00 p. 



Returning leave Boston at 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09, 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 A. M. 

Returning leave Worcester at 11.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 A. M and 2.34 p. it. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 A. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m. ,.12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. it. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20. 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. it. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 8.01, 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 A. M., 1.20, 7.18 p. it. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 1 1.46 a. it., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



AGGIE LIFii 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. J. iSCeiJUIyAHE, 

10S Main Stkeet, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL. ANO WOOD. 

THOMAS 0. VILLQE, 

DEALER in 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OP THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



MILLIARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



GO TO ■ 



1895. 



LULL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Glass and Group Ulork a Spseialfcy. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



E. K, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



0. S. GA'IE.S D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 



OI 

Cutler's Block 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

Practical; Wlvt. 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A large stock of 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 

HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



??C 3< 



"BUGS FOB VIOLIN, BANJO km GUITAR. 



AT 



Cusfiman's /^tisic Store, 



XOlt TUAMfTON. 



Merchant Tail 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Hurt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ES2S33*£':-r.™5S±S'iSSK~rE2^53 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 




D 




NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 

AND FURNISHINGS. 



Buy the Latest Farm Machinery and lake Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
in;; Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Ildlibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 

§UPER10Rjtei> (JfcASS 

•KOLLEf^l 7' T y^ LARS 










"J 



n,_ 



110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and plautiug the same, free on application. 



sSS 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



.a-i^iese^st house 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST. MASS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS & CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



iSiissi iriiB ^m:^.-i3?gF^L5i.£ 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE 1'URE BRED 

Pescheron Horses id Soutndown Step, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, " 

Botanical Department, 

amhkkst, mass. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. and ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 

SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. mcSEiNSDNj 33. U. B. 



\i 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

3 TO 12 -A-_ U".. 1-30 TO 5 E>. IvI. 



Ether and Nirons Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



0. Nh CHAMBERLAIN, 

Livery and Feed Stable, 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX HOW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

PRESS SHOES, IN l'ATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A EULL LINE OF 

lE^TT-ieBiHilR GtOOZDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JB&'ltepairing done while you. wait.jgj 

T, "V&T. SIvOAIV. 

si vnazsix row. 



DICKINSON I GOERTII, 



BOARDING 



Livery, Feed and Exchange Stable 



Hacks to and from all tiains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Bttru, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

tr. Stationer and Newsd 



WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT Ana SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 

HAIR BB.BSSIWG- ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED. BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex Amherst, Mass. 



NO. 1 LOOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges lor Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call responded to nt residence, Iir>t door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

Jperatree Steam Launc 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, O. I?*. 1=A.T_,."'*SI3E£ '9?, 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

rSs:S ATISFACTION GUAKANTEED. ft-E? 1 

Office : 

Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge -to and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



J^-SPECIAL RATES.«^8 



Passenger to center, 
Passenger to Aggie, - 
2 Passengers to Aggie, - 
g or more passengers to Aggie, 
Passenger and trunk, 



10c. 

- 25c. 

40c. 

15c. each. 

25c. 



Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE 



,12 h,. 



e Popularity of w Clones 
lei we en Pleased to See. 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



Eh PftsTSFifts 
h • h 



ClotHieis, Tailors, flatters, Fiipis. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACKSON & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GEMT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, ' Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



B. 1ST. BLOUB-ISTT & CO., 

Merchant Tailors 

AND DEALERS IN 

READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^•"Repairing neatly done at short notice..,^ 



Sso. 1ST. BladgEtt Sc Ob. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 

3 rz*f^ 



FOUNTAIN :E»KN®. 
Sevmour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



4-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, &* 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE COKFE)CTlONEMY 9 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may Hud himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Eoynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 27, 1895. 



NO. 6 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96, As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96. Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97. Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97. Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



rtori&ls. 



We understand that the faculty are considering the 
feasibility of having the college open Sept. 20, instead 
of Sept. 5th as has been the custom for the past few 
years. Our college opens earlier than any other col- 
lege in the country. At Harvard and Yale college opens 
Oct. 1st. Their is no doubt but that the student does 
not get benefit enough for these two weeks for study- 
ing at a season of the year when the temperature is 
rarely less than 80°. We trust that the faculty of our 
college are not so far behind, but that they can see 
that it would be a benefit to the student to have the 
fall term open about two or three weeks later than 
at present scheduled. Amherst, Smith and other 
colleges in this vicinity are doing it. Is there any 
reason why we should begin earlier? If so, please let 
us know. 



Now that the state election is over, and we know 
who the representatives in the legislature will be for 
1896 we think it is a good time for those who are 
interested in having the battalion go into camp at 
Framingham to have this matter started. Last year 
our petition was sent a day or two too late. Let us 
keep our eyes open this year and see that our petition 
is sent at the proper time. Lieut. Col. Hughes who 
is in a position to judge, says that it would be one of 
the best experiences for the cadets. We understand 
that Pres. Goodell and Lieut. Dickinson are in favor of 
having the above plan carried out. We trust that those 
who have the matter in charge will do all in their 
power to secure the necessary appropriation from the 
state. 



We frequently hear complaints made by students 
wishing to draw books from the library that some par- 
ticular volume which they desire to obtain is not on 
the shelves, having been absent for some time. In- 
vestigation generally shows that these books are held 
by some member of the faculty. Some books are 
out for a month, or even a term, and some cannot be 
found in the library during any part of the year. We 
fail to see why these volumes, which are intended for 
the use of the whole College, should be piled up in the 
room of someone department, instead of being brought 
back to the library for the use of the students. If 
they have been kept out simply through forgetfulness, 
we trust they will soon be returned to their proper 
places. 



We print in another column an article " College 
Loyalty " in which the writer calls attention to an edi- 
torial printed in the Life some time ago. We wish to 
call attention to the fact that never in the history of 
our college paper have we been what we believe to 
be otherwise than loyal to our Alma Mater. That we 
view things differently, we do not deny, but we are 



6 4 



AGGIE LIFE. 



now, as we have always been, true to the best interests 
of the college and the undergraduates. The writer of 
the article is in sympathy with us rather than other- 
wise, but he takes a different point of view. The spirit 
shown by the writer is the spirit we admire though at 
present, in holding a partially different view, we are 
made to suffer by comparison. Our columns are 
always open to those who would advance the interests 
of the college, and we believe there is no better way 
of discussing subjects of so vital importance to the col- 
lege than in the college paper. Depend on it, gentle- 
men : We are with you for advancement. 



The Eastern situation continues extremely critical, 
and it is evident that more anxiety is felt in Europe 
over it than for many years past. This anxiety cen- 
ters largely upon the position of the Sultan. It is al- 
most impossible for Western people to understand the 
entreme fanaticism of a large portion of the sultan's 
subjects. This fanaticism is so queer, and takes the 
form of such a bitter hatred of Christians, that any sus- 
picion on the part of many of the sultan's subjects that 
their ruler had yielded to Western influence or force 
would instantly create a violent opposition to him. Such a 
suspicion already exists. Rumors of revolution and 
assassination are rife and there is apparently very lit- 
tle doubt that the life of the Sultan is in actual danger. 
At any moment the news from Constantinople may be 
of his overthrow. England is troubled to know what 
to do since she is bound by diplomatic relation to re- 
main almost quiet. Russia has great power not only 
over China but also over Turkey, and she is backed 
up by France, while Germany remains quiet. This 
leaves England out of account at the two capitals 
where her influence has long been, if not paramount, 
at least very great. Thus the situation naturally 
causes great anxiety in England, and may indicate 
very radical changes in the relations of Great Powers 
of the East. 



The loss by fire of the historic main building of the 
University of Virginia is a serious impairment, for the 
moment, of the facilities of one of our foremost insti- 
tutions of learning. The great rotunda in which was 
lodged the library, and the wing behind it, in which 
the teaching work of the University in all, or most all 



of its departments was carried on, were practically de- 
stroyed. The alumni of the University are already 
making a concerted effort to raise funds in order to 
repair the damage incurred, and it is very much to be 
hoped that their efforts will meet with a cordial re- 
sponse. The indebtedness of American education to 
the University of Virginia has never been adequately 
recognized. This indebtedness is very great. Many 
of the modifications and innovations of old-time meth- 
ods and practices which have been made in the north- 
ern colleges during the last twenty-five years were 
originally introduced at the University which Thomas 
Jefferson devised, and which bears in so many ways 
the marks of his singularly comprehensive and cath- 
olic mind. The University has always stood for what 
is soundest in scholarship and has played no small 
part in fostering the scholarly spirit in the country. 
Its prosperity does not concern Virginia alone. It is a 
matter of interest and moment to the whole country. 

_ <o» 

"THE GRIP WE HA VE TO CARRY." 
What lots of nonsense people talk 

About their cares and trouble, 
'Till just to hear them going on 

"Would make your own ills double. 
Some evening when you're feeling blue 

Then Tom and Dick and Harry, 

Will come and tell you all about 
The grips they have to carry. 

Just wait 'till winter comes around 

With cold and snow and rain. 
You soon will wish with all your heart 

The summer back again. 
But winter lingers on and on 

His thrusts you cannot parry 
And it's weeks and months before you're rid 

Of La Grippe you have to carry. 

The farmer to the city comes 

And all his money brings, 
And meets a pleasant featured gent, 

Whose fingers stick to things. 
The fellow takes his bag to check, 

Ere long the wheat gets scary, 
But that's the last he will ever see 

Of the grip he had to carry. W. 



ACKNOWLEDGED. 
" I made you what you are," 

The tailor said unto 
"The youth who nodded and replied, 

■' I owe my all to you." 



-Ariel. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



65 



on 



THE RELATION OF OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
TO GOOD GOVERNMENT. 

When our Pilgrim Fathers came to America near- 
ly three hundred years ago, they established first the 
church, next the school. Since that time our school 
system has grown until it was one of the main stays 
of the American government, and a shining light in 
the progress of civilization. Every village, great or 
small, every town in the east or west, has its free 
schools. Every child living in America must have a 
common school education. 

This country being a Republic, the government de- 
pends for its continuance upon the education of the 
people ; and how else can the masses be reached than 
by the free public schools. It is a broad and 
liberal education that makes good legislators, 
and from good legislators only can come good 
government. 

In making the laws which govern a country the 
better educated a man is, the better laws will be 
made, and the better government obtained. There- 
fore seek out the educated man and put him where he 
can exert and influence for the right. But the well 
educated man says, " I do not wish to go into politics, 
there is no money in it for me, and the honor gained 
is not worth the time spent ; " thus the greater part of 
our law-makers are men who have received only a 
common school education. 

Look at the committees from the State Legislature 
which come to this college every year. We have 
seen them. How many look as if they had received 
a college education such as we are receiving ? Yet 
upon such men rests the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, the expenditure of the people's dollars and 
cents. Should we not then strive to put the best 
educational advantages possible before every one ? 

Since all our people attend our public schools, and 
get their education therefrom, let us see wherein they 
have been benefited. Have they simply acquired a 
few facts or have they gctten something else, of more 
value to them, which cannot be obtained from books 
or by any amount of study ? 

In the first place, they become acquainted with 
facts, some of which become a part of themselves 
but most of which are soon forgotten. Now the value 



of these facts thus obtained cannot be overestimated 
but the greatest advantage derived from this training 
is the ability to learn, or to concentrate one's mind on 
a certain subject for a length of time. Thus when 
the man who has had such training goes to Congress, 
he has better control over himself, some influence 
over his friends, and, being on a higher plane than 
they do his part towards raising the standard of our 
government. 

Another valuable thing experienced in the school is 
submission, that act wherein the child's will is made 
to yield to a stronger one, and by so doing he learns to 
recognize the rights of others and to respect their 
opinions. A child who wishes to do some little act 
and is allowed to do so without restraint, soon forms a 
habit of self-indulgence that is most unfortunate. On 
the other hand the very act of having to ask permis- 
sion for the hundred and one little things he needs 
causes him to conform to the rights of others and to 
see that they have wishes to be respected as well as 
he. So the man who starts for the " General Court " 
respecting the opinions of others is bound to come 
out ahead of any one who has no regard for super- 
iority. 

So it is that our school system is one of the grand- 
est institutions in existence. Where else in the 
world does every child receive an education at the 
hands of competent persons, but in this glorious 
Republic ? 

Where else is there a system of free public schools 
that can compare with those in existence in this Old 
Bay State ? Look at the men and women who go 
out every year from our colleges and seminaries to 
engage in teaching. Can any minds, however young, 
keep from being benefited while in daily contact with 
such people ? 

It has been said that an ignorant population is a 
menace to any form of government, but it is fatal to 
a democratic government, like ours whose destiny is 
decided by its citizens irrespective of educational 
qualification. So let us strive to build up our schools. 
Let the young be taught, and the next generation will 
be wiser and more educated ; better able to guide with 
a steady hand the " Ship of State " steering clear of 
the shoals of ignorance, and on to such peace, pros- 
perity and power, as have never yet been enjoyed. 

A. P. 



66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE LOYALTY. 

In a recent issue of the Aggie Life the small 
number of the last two entering classes at the college 
is dolefully deplored and reasons are suggested for the 
smallness of our undergraduate body. I believe that 
you are in a measure right and partly wrong in your 
conclusions. 

In the first place the "standard of admission" is 
said to be " too high." Would you lower the ciass of 
work possible in this institution by reducing the mental 
capacity of the entering class ? It is impossible to 
study scientific subjects advantageously until the 
elementary branches have been mastered. Every 
New Engiand community has schools accessible in 
which rudimentary subjects are taught, and it ought 
not to be necessary for the Agricultural college to look 
for increase in numbers among those who have still to 
master the common school studies. The standard of 
admission too high ! Compare it with that of other 
colleges with which we compete. Do they lack 
numbers ? One reason our athletic teams have met 
with so little success is that they meet teams of older, 
maturer men who have had the training of good high 
schools or academies before entering college. There 
may be alterations in our entrance requirements that 
are imperative to the building up the strength of our 
classes, but we should never for a moment think of 
lowering the standard of admission. We want it under- 
stood that only young men with bright well trained 
minds are to be found among our undergraduates. 
Changes in entrance requirements are already under 
contemplation that with other favorable influences are 
sure to enter a large class of Nineteen Hundred. 

The suggestion that the two years course is a 
" catchall" is somewhat misleading. It is too bad to 
characterize it as such for the moral effect of the 
sentiment on the student body So long as it is a part 
of the college let us stand up for it and defend it out 
of self respect if for no other reason. Such slurs 
serve no good purpose, but bring the college itself into 
discredit. 

As a matter of fact no man ever was nor ever will 
be dropped from the four years course into the two 
years. The officers of the college are very decided 
in their intention not to throw the short course into 
discredit by making it a " dumping ground " for shiftless 
regular students. Indeed the two classes in the present 



short course have only one member who was ever in 
the college course, and he was not dropped into it. 
The Freshman class has, by the way, four men who 
have come to it out of the two years course. The 
latter is not then a " catch all " as has been affirmed 
but more of a feeder. 

But leaving these bare facts to speak as they will, 
there is a sentiment of discontent and unrest about 
the college that mars the beauty of student life, and 
impairs the work of the institution. It is manifestly 
an unprofitable and unhealthy condition that gives rise 
to such feelings. The efficiency of the college and 
the spirit of its men depend largely on the attitude of 
the student body, If this is loyal and enthusiastic, 
advancement goes merrily on by its own impetus, 
while if discontented and fault finding work drags and 
stagnation threatens. 

A strong effort is being made to secure a large 
entering class next fall. In order to meet with its 
fullest success this effort must be shared by every 
undergaduate. His report of his work and his oppor- 
tunities here to his townsmen must be one of enthusi- 
asm and loyalty in order to induce others to try them. 
Students often fail to realize their own influence on 
the numbers of our entering classes. 

The Aggie Life is a valuable exponent of the col- 
lege and a criterion by which its sentiments is com- 
monly measured. Its loyal devotion to the institution 
cannot fail to have a good effect in bringing to us a 
desirable class of students. 

" Distance lends enchantment," yet while in the 
hazy distance the towers and turrets of other colleges 
seem grand and beautiful, let us also see the strong 
and good at home. We need not suffer by compari- 
son. Loyalty to Alma Mater has always been a marked 
characteristic of our alumni. Let us not go backward 
in this particular while we advance in others. 

F. S. Cooley. 



THE NEGRO QUESTION. 
Should the negro continue to possess the right to 
vote, is the question that is now agitating the people 
of the South. It is heard at Washington and it is 
heard throughout the nation. The people of the North, 
particularly here in England, are accustomed to view 
the matter in a false light. Our orators picture the 
negro as striving for education, morality and good 



AGGIE LIFE. 



67 



government ; and his white neighbors are oppressing 
and intimidating him, seeking to keep him in poverty 
and in ignorance. One has but to go among the peo- 
ple of the South to learn that much of the sympathy 
for the negro is wasted, and that at the present time 
he is wholly incapable of voting understandingly. 

One half the population of the South is of the black 
race, and these people are content to live in squalor, 
ignorance, and immorality. They are improvident, 
depraved, and strenuously resist any attempts at edu- 
cation. Is it any wonder that they often incur the 
wrath of their white neighbors, when they commit 
such horrible outrages as our daily papers recount? 
With all of our New England conservatism, I believe 
that there is not one of us that would not be among 
the first to avenge such crimes. 

We are told that because the black man fought for 
the Union during the war of the Rebellion he is now 
entitled to retain the privilege of franchise. All hon- 
or, I say, to those brave men who wore the Union 
blue ; but they are only a small fraction compared 
with the millions of negroes in the South to-day. 

Let us glance backward and see what the condition 
of the negro was just before and just after the close of 
the war ! The emancipation proclamation was issued 
solely as a war measure. In the National Intelligence 
of that day we find President Lincoln himself writing 
as follows : "If there be those who would not save the 
Union unless they could destroy slavery, I do not agree 
with them. My paramount object in this struggle is 
to save the Union, and is not either to destroy or save 
slavery. What I do about slavery and the colored 
race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union ; 
and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe 
it could help to save the Union." That the cursed 
human traffic must be abolished Lincoln well knew ; 
but he knew also that some gradual means would be 
better than a proclamation that should immediately 
free a great body of people unprepared for freedom. 
Yet the radicals of the North, headed by Horace 
Greely, were clamoring for the immediate abolition of 
slavery, and Lincoln realizing that without their sup- 
port operations at the front could no longer be con- 
ducted, issued his famous proclamation. 

The people of the North looked eagerly for some 
immediate result favorable both to the cause of the 
Union, and to the uplifting of the negro race. They 



looked in vain. It did help to hasten the fall of the 
Confederacy ; but at the close of the war the condi- 
tion of the negro was practically worse than ever. Re- 
cently freed and deplorably ignorant, there were thrust 
upon this people the responsibilities and duties of citi- 
zenship. At a time when the South was striving to 
recover from the chaos of business, social, and politi- 
cal ruin, there was introduced this new and perplexing 
element ; a great body of non-producers, non-tax-pay- 
ers, possessing the right to vote, and whose rights the 
various commonwealth must protect. To add to the 
difficulties of the day was the negro's attitude toward 
the ballot. He regarded it as a pledge of property 
from the government, sufficient to yield him a scanty 
living for the rest of his life. This could not but 
make him lazy, and the thought of owning property 
filled him with visionary aspirations for office. The 
negro also regarded the ballot as giving him the right 
to tread upon his old masters. Holding this opinion 
he became a dangerous element in society. In short, 
the giving of the unqualified ballot to a people totally 
unfitted and unprepared for it was a direct blow against 
intelligent republican government. The disorder and 
difficulties that followed show this to be true. 

Thirty years have brought little change ; and to-day, 
with the rapid multiplication of the negro race, the 
situation is becoming more and more serious. 

What shall we do with the negro? It is the ques- 
tion of the hour! Many and varied are the plans that 
have been suggested. Some propose that the negroes 
all be massed together on some government reserva- 
tion. Others urge that they be sent back to their na- 
tive land, and there, on the shores of Africa, be left to 
formulate a government of their own. No such eva- 
sive measures can ever succeed. The negro is cer- 
tain to remain where he is, because there he is per- 
fectly contented and because the means of going else- 
where are absolutely lacking. It is here in our own 
country that the momentous problem must be solved. 

The first step in this solution should be to deprive 
the negro of the ballot. Let it not be restored until 
the negro has attained a certain degree of decency, 
intelligence, and knowledge of the principles of our 
government! When the negro understands that these 
things are required of him he will exert himself to the 
utmost to attain them. Let it no longer be said of 
this great nation that hundreds of thousands of votes 



68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



are annually cast by a race as idle, as ignorant, as are 
the savages of the South Sea Islands, or the Indians 
of our western plains! Let us not suffer the ballot. 
that safe-guard of a republican government, to remain 
longer in the hands of a people who are but half Chris- 
tianized and half civilized ! 



THIS WINTER'S A THLETICS. 

Many articles of comment have appeared in the col- 
umns of the Life, in regard to the need of a gymna- 
sium at the college. 

At present, we have nothing which we can call by 
that name. It is true, there is a little gymnastic 
apparatus in the Drill Hall, but it is not sufficient in 
quantity to be of any great help toward the improve- 
ment of our physical condition. What we need is a 
well furnished gymnasium, such as we find at other 
colleges, in charge of a competent instructor. 

As we have not such a building and apparatus it is 
evident that if we wish to take any physical exercise, 
besides drill, during the winter, we must take advan- 
tage of what little we have. 

We have an athletic association governed and 
directed in a similar manner to the various other asso- 
ciations of the college. The directors of the associa- 
tion are not competent to teach the students the vari- 
ous feats to be performed on or with the various 
pieces of apparatus, but even if they were they could 
not find the time. Thus it all devolves upon the stu- 
dent himself, aided perhaps by whosoever happens to 
be present at the same time. 

It is the purpose of the association to stimulate this 
individual work. The directors will give whatever aid 
lies in their power to help those who wish to practice. 
At present a few of the directions for performing the 
most important exercises will be printed and placed 
with each piece of apparatus. New apparatus will be 
set up soon after Christmas, and all the old apparatus 
will be improved and repaired. 

During the winter term a series of meets will take 
place, as usual in the Drill Hall, the points to be con- 
tested by the different classes. Each class will be 
requested to form an athletic team and to pick out the 
best individuals in each event and enter them, thus 
doing away with the necessity of entering a whole class 
to each event and thereby causing delay. 

To those who do not compete, it is necessary to say 



that gentle, moderate exercise will be of as great ben- 
efit to you as the violent exertions of your classmates, 
who are struggling, with their nerves strung and their 
muscles drawn, to break a record. 

The one great value to the college of the apparatus 
now present in the Drill Hall is the fact that there is 
enough of the right kind of apparatus present that 
should be of benefit to the base-ball team ; therefore, 
those trying for positions on the team can, during the 
winter term, receive instructions along this line under 
the direction of the base-ball captain. H. 



FRENCH COACH STALLION. 
Lance No. 1716. 

Among the new acquisitions to the list of pure 
bred live stock at the Mass. Agr'l College, is the 
French Coach Stallion Lance, — No. 1716 in the 
Stud-book of the French Coach Horse Society of 
America — which was purchased of James S. Sanborn 
of Lewiston, Maine. 

The demand for fine coach horses, that are of good 
size, and showy action, with plenty of substance has 
not suffered, in spite of the extremely low prices real- 
ized for ordinary horses. Superior coach horses will 
always be in demand, and not only do they bring high 
prices for park and carriage purposes, they make the 
best farm and general purpose horses in the world. 
The best single horse in a class open to all breeds at 
the recent Madison Square Garden exhibition, was the 
crossbred French Coach and American Standard 
horse Cogent. 

Lance is not only of a very desirable class of horses 
but an excellent individual and grandly bred. His 
sire and dam were both imported ; the latter it is said 
is one of the best animals ever brought over by Mr. 
Dunham our largest importer of French horses. 
Lance traces directly through thoroughbred stock in 
six lines to Godolphin Arabian, and in six to Darley 
Arabian ; the two most prepotent sires in establishing 
the thoroughbred race horse. 

Among the most noted animals in the pedigree are 
Eclipse and King Herod. The former is not only the 
only horse which was continually on the turf for two 
years and never beaten in a race, but he was the sire 
of 334 winners, and it is computed that they gained 
for their owners £160,000 besides numerous cups and 
plates, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



69 



King Herod was the sire of 497 winners which 
gained £200,000 on the turf The College is to be 
congratulated on having secured so good an individ- 
ual out of so noted a family of animals. 



— Are we going to have a military ball this winter? 

— C. A. King '97 is absent from college on the sick 
list till after Thanksgiving. 

— G. H. A. Thompson '98 has fully recovered from 
his injury and will return to college after the Thanks- 
giving recess. 

— Members of the Hampshire and Franklin County 
Press Club inspected the college grounds and buildings 
Wednesday, Nov. 20th, 

— Prof. G. E. Stone gave a lecture on " Plant 
Growth" Friday, Nov. 15, under the auspices of the 
Amherst Woman's Club. 

— Thursday, Nov. 14, members of the examining 
committee from the State Board of Agriculture 
inspected the college and its departments. 

— The following men have recently become members 
of the college fraternities, D. G. K., E. H. Sharpe, 
1st year and E. K. Perry, 1st year; C. S. C, W. 
D. Hinds, '98. 

— Dr. Walker attended the meeting of the National 
Grange Thursday and Friday, Nov. 14 and 15, preach- 
ing the following Sunday at Worcester in exchange 
with Rev. Calvin Stebbins. 

— Rev. Calvin Stebbins of Worcester, the noted 
Unitarian divine, delivered an eloquent sermon before 
the college and members of the Universalist Church 
on Sunday, Nov. 17. A large number of visitors were 
present at the services. 

— Rev. K. Tomioka, chaplain of Hokkaido Prison, 
Japan, visited the college Tuesday, Nov. 12th. His 
main object in America is to study our prison and 
reformatory system as set forth by the best institutions 
of this nature in the country. 

— Owing to the unavoidable absence of several 
members of the Glee Club, the Thanksgiving trip has 
been postponed till the first week of the Christmas 
vacation. A concert has also been arranged for Fri- 
day Dec. 6th at Feeding Hills. 



— Through an oversight, H. C. Burrington and N. 
Shultis of the senior class were overlooked in the prep- 
aration of class committees. At a recent class meet- 
ing Burrington was put on the Printing Committee and 
Shultis on the Finance Committee. 

— Edward R. Uchida, a young Japanese student, is 
now working on the college farm and endeavoring to 
gain an insight into our system of Agriculture, more 
particularly the milk industry. He intends to enter 
the freshman class at the beginning of next term. 

— Isham, First Year, blistered his hand on the trav- 
eling rings lately, a very trifling matter, but blood 
poisoning set in, his hand swelled and was lanced sev- 
eral times, and finally he was forced to go home till the 
pain subsided, Moral — be temperate in all things, 
even in recreation. 

— The Sophomores have begun microscopic work in 
the botanical laboratory under Dr. Stone. Although 
not in the scheduled course, a number of Juniors have 
expressed a desire to take up this study in the labora- 
tory this winter. We hope arrangements may be 
made to that effect. 

— Horner, who was to have been the '96 class pho- 
tographer, has resigned in favor of Hastings, also of 
Boston, and an equally reliable man in the profession. 
Hastings was in town Friday and Saturday, Nov. 22 
and 23, and gave sittings to the Senior class and other 
members of the college. He is an excellent artist 
and should be well patronized. 

— The last lecture in the Union Lecture Course 
was one of the finest ever offered. Dr. Lorimer is a 
speaker of great power and personality. The people's 
poet, Robert Burns, has indeed a worthy champion in 
this man who portrays so vividly and forcibly the life 
and character of Scotland's sweetest singer. The 
next lecture, Dec. 1 1 , will be given by Prof. John M. 
Tyler of Amherst College on " Animal Intelligence." 

— We would suggest that those men who have not 
as yet paid their subscriptions to the football associa- 
tions do so at once. It cannot be called a strictly 
honorable action when a man refuses to pay the 
money he has pledged simply because of the unsuc- 
cessful season. There are subscription enough yet 
uncollected to pay all debts of the Association and 
leave a small surplus. If our legacy to the next foot- 
ball team cannot be a victorious record, it surely can 
be a record free from debt. 



7 o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The athletic association has levied a tax of 25 
cents on the college, for the purpose of making needed 
repairs in the apparatus and of offering prizes as fol- 
lows : 1st. A prize to each of the three men receiv- 
ing the most points in the athletic meet this winter. 
2d. A prize to the man from each class receiving the 
most points of any in his class. The value of these 
prizes depends on the promptness with which every 
man pays his tax. Let us make these meets a suc- 
cess. Time spent in training for the events could not 
be better employed. A good physique is as essential 
to well developed manhood as intellectual ability. 
One may get along very well without the latter, 
but with the former lacking life is robbed of half 
its beauty and usefulness. A combination of the two 
is what we seek. 

— At a meeting of the directors of the Whist Club, 
a list of entries was drawn, subject to the following 
conditions: 1st. That the rules and regulations be 
used with their proper interpretation. 2d. That the 
game consist of ten points (no honors). 3d. That 
one game decide each contest. 4th. That no signals 
be used. 5th. That the person or persons disobeying 
the rules herein described be debarred from further 
contest. 6th. That all men must pay their dues or 
become subject to rule five. 7th. That a suitable 
prize be awarded. 8th. That the first series of games 
be concluded by 12 p. m. Saturday, Nov. 23. 9th. 
That the results of the game be reported to the Pres- 
ident of the club as soon as possible after finishing the 
game. 10th. That any disputes arising be examined 
and settled by the board of directors. The winners of 
the first drawing are as follows : Goessmann and J. 
W. Allen, Nutting and Read, Harper and Barrett, 
Barclay and Courtney, Dutcher and Edwards, Moore 
and Barry. The second drawing will take place as 
soon as possible. 

— The excellence of our reading room is not fully 
appreciated by the majority of students. It contains 
all the leading papers and magazines of the day neatly 
arranged on tables and shelves for consultation and 
reference. Every effort is made to make the room 
attractive ; every inducement is offered for literary 
development. Well lighted, well heated, and well 
furnished, it provides to some extent, the comforts of 
a home to the students while in college. It is surpris- 



ing, considering the boisterous nature of the average 
college student elsewhere, to enter the reading room 
and note the quiet and decorous silence which prevails. 
We have records, in days gone by, of some men using 
the reading room as a gymnasium, but such barbari- 
ties have long since passed away. Each student 
respects the rights of others to read and study without 
being disturbed by unseemly sights and sounds. 

— Following an established custom, a petition 
signed by every member of the college has been pre- 
sented to the faculty, asking for the usual Thanksgiv- 
ing recess from 10-30 Wednesday Nov, 27th to chapel 
the following Tuesday. We doubt not but what the 
faculty will grant our petition. The Thanksgiving 
turkey is just as sweet and the associations of the day 
just as dear to us as they were to them, when they, 
like us, were in college, away from home and its 
influence. Of all days, Thanksgiving brings to us 
more of joy, more of peace, than any other. It is a 
day of family reunions, a gathering of brothers and 
sisters, of parents and children, all draw once more 
around the old hearthstone and renew the bonds of 
sympathy and love. So long as we have the Christian 
home with all the influences and associations which 
make it the dearest spot on earth ; so long as we have 
brothers and sisters, parents and children, bound together 
by the golden cord of love, just so long will Thanks- 
giving day retain its truest and noblest significance — a 
day of the home. The proclamation of our governor 
sets apart one day for public thanksgiving and prayer 
to the Divine giver of every good and perfect gift, 
closing with that grand old invocation, which finds an 
echo in every patriotic heart, " God save the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts." Like a reverential 
Amen there comes to our lips, " And God bless our 
home." 



A REVERIE. 

It's just at the glow of sunset 

Only a tiny star. 

That chimes are speaking in sadness 

Out from the old church tower. 

They are telling the old, old story 

Of the days of long ago, 

Of their pleasures, their pains and sighings, 

And of things we cannot know. 

But wait as the years glide onward 

And Time repeats from afar, 

We'll glance at the West 

For we'll know the rest, 

What the chime tone meanings are, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



7i 



Thanksgiving vacation is at hand and although the 
disturbances in the East continue and the unfortunate 
Armenian is being inhumanly treated by his cruel 
Turkish master the average college student will for 
a day at least join hands with the oppressed in down- 
ing the "fowl Turk." Happily we are removed from 
the scenes of blood, rapine and plunder and our turkey 
will be in a condition to cause us to care little for the 
Eastern war-board, for the wellfare of the Sultan, or 
for the future of that far-off, oppressed, Christian peo- 
ple. After we have gathered about the festive board 
and within that sacred precinct of the family circle 
lifted our hearts and souls to God in thanksgiving for 
his many blessings to us in this land of Christianity and 
freedom, utter a fervent prayer that when next we gath- 
er about our hearthstones to celebrate the day so 
purely American in its origin, inhumanity so revolt- 
ing in its native cruelty so barbaric in its maliciousness 
will be no longer practiced on a patient and long suf- 
fering people, 



GLEE AND BANJO CLUB CONCERT. 

The college Glee and Banjo clubs made their first 
appearance in public this season at the college chapel 
Saturday evening and were v/ell received by a large 
audience composed of students and friends of the col- 
lege. It is often very truly said that one's own people 
are the most critical and the first to detect flaws, but 
critical as was the audience that attended the concert 
Saturday evening we failed to hear other than words 
of praise for the Glee and Banjo clubs. The parts 
were well arranged and carefully selected with a view 
to give variety to the program and to please all who 
enjoy good music. The Glee Club is by far the best 
trained and managed of any the college has had for 
many years and the individual work of its members is 
of high class. The Banjo Club is the first organiza- 
tion of the kind in the history of the college and it is 
difficult for the listener to tell which is the more enter- 
taining the Glee or the Banjo Club. Mr. Jose" Canto, 
the leader of the Banjo Club, is a very capable and 
efficient man for the place and his execution of his 
own composition Esperanza was one of the many 
features of the evening's entertainment. 



The Clubs have arranged a series of dates and we 
feel that they will be well received wherever they give 
their concerts. The following was the program : 

Part I. 

1. Glee. Footlight Fancy. Ezechiels 

2. March, Normandie, 

The Banjo Club. 

3. Quartette, Spin, Spin. Jungst 

4. Selected, Esperanza, Composed by Jose Canto 

Banjeaurine Solo by Mr. Jose" Canto. 

5. Glee, Come join that Fand. Plantation Melody 

The Glee and Banjo Club. 

Part II. 

1. Selected, On the Mill Dam, 

The Banjo Club. 

2. Waltz, Santa Rosa. 

Mandolin Solo by Mr. J. Canto. 

3. Glee. Night is Still. Clark 

4. Selected, Tabasco March, Chadwick 

Banjeaurine Solo by Mr. Josd Canto. 

5. Glee, Lullaby and Good Night, Brahms 
C. A. Norton, '97, Manager, F. E. DeLuce, '96, Leader of 

Glee Club, Jose Canto, '97, Leader of Banjo Club. 



Baseball practice has begun already at the U. of P. 

Journalism has become a university subject in Ger- 
many. 

A Press Club has just been organized at Dart- 
mouth. 

There are from 1,500 to 2,000 American students 
in France. 

The Harvard students are said to have nick-named 
her team as "The Sandless Quitter." 

The faculty of Harvard during the summer confis- 
cated all signs found in the students' rooms. 

Harvard has not chosen a captain for her ball team. 
Scannel will probably be elected to fill that position 
in the spring. 

Cornell goes back to the examination system this 
year. This means that last year's plan of exemption 
from exams, was a failure. 

The University of Chicago receives a gift of 
$1,000,000 from John D. Rockefeller with the offer 
of $2,000,000 more if the University shall raise a like 
amount before January 1, 1900. 



72 



AGGIE LIFE. 



A student was recently expelled from the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, for sending false reports to a daily 
newspaper. Student correspondents all over the 
country might take warning and see that their reports 
contain nothing detrimental to their college. 

A new course has been started in Yale, and will be 
carried on the first year as an experiment. It is the 
course in modern novels, the object of which is to 
teach students to read standard novels in a way to 
strengthen their mental powers instead of as a mental 
debauch. 

The Princeton Gun Club won the triangular inter- 
collegiate shoot at Monmouth Junction recently. 
Harvard was a close second, being only four birds 
behind Princeton. Yale came in last with a score of 
18 birds less than Harvard, The score follows: 
Princeton, 120 

Harvard, 1 1 6 

Yale, 98 

The first field day of the Vassar athletic association 
was held Saturday in a rain storm. Two games of 
basket ball were played and then a 100-yard dash was 
run. The distance covered in the running broad 
jump was 1 1 feet, 5 inches The best time made in 
the 120-yard hurdle was 25 3-4 seconds, and the 
winner of the running high jump cleared the bar at a 
height of 48 inches. 

WILL O'THE WISP OF LOVE. 
My oldest pipe — my dearest girl, 

Alas, which shall it be ? 
For she has said that I must choose 

Between herself and thee. 

Farewell old pipe. For many years 

You've been my closest friend, 
And ever ready at my side 

Thy solace sweet to lend. 

No more from out thy weedy bowl, 

When fades the twilight's glow, 
Will visions fair and sweet arise 

Or fragrant fancies flow. 

No more by flickering candle light 

Try genii I'll evoke 
To build my castles in the air 

With wreaths of waving smoke. 

And so farewell, a long farewell, 

Until the wedding's o'er, 
And then I'll go on smoking thee 

Just as I did before. 

—E. D., of Va. '86. 



ODE TO A SEAGULL. 
For to the heaven's blue I see thee rise, 
A wind-tossed shadow on the changing skies, 

In fitful sleep : 

Now down the aery steep 
With rapid curve, and now full-measured, slow, 
Toiling against the breezes as they blow 

Across the deep. 

Or through drear wastes of cloud with dreamy motion, 
Lulled by the tremor of the throbbing ocean, 

Thou tak'st thy way ; 

While far below. 

Wrapped in the sunset glow, 
The purple hills fade in the deepened gray 
That seals the slumber of reluctant day. 

Fair bird, I would that I like thou might roam 
And claim the world a universal home ; 

Think not of care, 

Of sorrow or despair, 
But see God's beauties round me everywhere, 
And in their contemplation learn to feel 
That deeper love which worldly thoughts conceal. 

Oft when the growing night is wild and dreary. 
And 1 am sick at heart and over-weary, 

I think of thee, 

Alone, unfettered, free. 
Above the storm that tears the ocean's breast, 
No grief to wound thee, happy in thy rest 

As heart could be. 

And then, forgetting somewhat of my care, 
I bide with thee in spirit everywhere : 

And, with a happier mind, 
Pass down the mazy byways of the years, 
Shorn of their sorrows and bereft of tears, 

And lose evil in the good I find. 

— P. L, Shaw in Harvard Advocate. 

LIFE A DREAM. 
With the lights agleam 

And the music's rush, 

Then a midnight's hush ; 
And life's a dream. 

With a yearning face 

And pleading eyes 

Then the glad surprise 
With its lighter trace. 

And a clinging hand 

And a fond embrace, 

When hearts enlace 
At a heart's demand. 

Then it would seem 

'Tis a vision rare ; 

Ah 1 life is fair 
When life's a dream. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



73 



I WONDER. 
I wonder where life's ringing duty call 

Will find us in the days to come ; 
I wonder if a few kind tears will fall 

When our poor fight is done. 

I wonder if the face that haunts our dreams 
Is mourning now, or glad and bright ; 

I wonder if the moon in glory streams 
O'er one lone grave to-night. 

1 wonder why the violet's fleeting breath 
Brings back one day of all the years ; 

I wonder when the solemn touch of death 
Will end our hopes and fears. — In Brunonian. 

LOVE'S MIRROR. 

In heavens, silver canopied, the moon, 
Majestic, pure and like a queen 
O'er whose countenance a fairy sheen 

Of charity soft glows, as some fair boon 

She grants to misery and smiling soon 
Restores the ebbing hope to life — serene 
The mirror moon reflects a distant scene 

Aud sound of music, in which love's the tune. 

As night draws on, her tender lights compel 
My lonely heart to ponder and a sea 
Of waving fancies — that may never be — 
Submerge my sense, and leave a joyous spell 
To cover up my woe ; I dream 'tis well, 

And that my faithful love looks down on me. 

— Buffalo Express. 

TO A ROSE ON THE BALL-ROOM FLOOR. 

Oh fallen rose ! I pity thee, 

Lost from that cluster fair to see, 
Whose fortune, rare, it is, to rest 
Where fain would I — were I so blest 

Close to that dear heart, light and free. 

But now, all scorned thou art — like me — 
Companion of my misery — 

Forgotten now, though once caressed 
Oh fallen rose ! 

So from the floor I rescue thee — 
Thy plight deserves my sympathy 
For I like thee am all unblest 
Forsaken, though I loved her best. 
Oh fallen rose ! 

—J. McKenno Wall, in Univ. of Va. Mag. 

AT THE FENCE. 
"Now, Tom dear, please to look away," 
Said a maiden with a bashful smile, 

"For you must know that for us girls, 
To climb the fence is not the stile." 

— Ex. 



Alumni and students are requested to contribute to 
these columns 

The tenth annual meeting and banquet of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College Club of New York, 
will be held at St. Denis Hotel, Broadway and 1 1th 
Street, Tuesday evening, December 17th, 1896, at 
seven o'clock. President Goodell and Lieutenant W. 
M. Dickinson, U. S. A., from the College and Pro- 
fessors Parker and Harrington, Captain A. H. Merrill, 
U. S. A., Lieut. C. A. L. Totton, U. S. A., retired, 
and Lieut. V. H. Bridgman, U. S. A. formerly of the 
Faculty will be the guests of the Club. Theme for 
discussion, "Does the Farmer need trade-unions." 
Dinner tickets, five dollars. Members and those de- 
sirous of joining must remit to the Secretary-Treas- 
urer on or before December 10th. 

Alvan L. Fowler, c. e , '80, Sec-Treas. 

133 Centre Street, New York. 



MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon anil German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



This space is reserved for 

F. W. DEWEY, 



■ DEALER IN - 



146 Main St., 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



74 



AGGIE LIFE. 




n 



4j J I|I^0 5 



^M^otM 



& 



The Pho tog raphe r fro m Boston 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



Llis sitjiii.bi! wm II 99, jll.il. b. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 

116 Tremout St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



P 



DEALER IN 



JflBTS, YflBTKS' IP BOYB' 

FINE CLOTHING 

FURNISHING GOODS. 

96 Main Street, - Northampton, Mass. 

LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Livery, Feed and Boarding Stable 

Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Street, - - Amherst, Mass. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
11-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; en Saturday from 8 A. m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., fcr reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston &: Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, A. M., 2.34 p. h.. Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09, 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 a. m. 

Returning leave Worcester at 11.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 A. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, A. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45. 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. M. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m.. 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., goinS 
south leave Amherst at 8.01. 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 11.46 a. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



.42 p. m. 
at 8.22, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Clas9 and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



los Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL AND WOOO. 

THOMAS C. BXLIbOI?, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AMD FREE BURNING CO 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



ALS 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



♦BILLIARD AND READING PARLOR * 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



■GO TO- 



1895. 



LULL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUM 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society,Glass and Group Iflork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



S—/ o I\, 



;e 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker 



First door from post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E, K. BROWN, D. D. S. 



rU~ # Eras, I ^ I § «ttrao5 B "tac^*? t 



Cutler's Block, - Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A large stock of 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 

HOT All? FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



STRINGS FOR VIOLIN, BANJO AID Gl 

AT 



rAR. 



s 



XOIl THASIfTON. 



tp> h M 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 




EJ3LQTHING 
FURNISHINGS. 





NORTHAMPTON. 



E. & W. COLLARS & CUFFS. 



FINE NECKWEAR. 



Buy tlie Latest Farm MacNneq and lake Honey. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found iu the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Ifellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



\UPERI0 
LfeUa 

K 0LLE i. 






Efor 

Circulars 




110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and planting the same, free on application. 



C R C 



tt* 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



^.2>A.tt3£tt!3'J 



siottss: 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural Gollege. 



Pirclu 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 

rses and SoiMvi Sheep. 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 



Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the puhlic 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 

SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COUCH & SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. DICKINSON. 



e. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMnERST, MASS. 



Office Hocks : 
o to 12 a. uvt-, 1-30 to 5 !=>_ m. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. M. CHAM! 



l o a a [ 

5 LH 5 1 



Livery arid Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 

TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

EXJBBSB C3O0I3S- 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



QSFJtepairing done while you tvait,J£& 
3 PHCEN1X ROW. 



BOAKDIWG 



Liverj, Feed and Exchange Stable. 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn f 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

Bookseller, Stationer and Mealor. 

WALL PATERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PAKISEAU BROTHERS, 



RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

PSAEMACIST. 
NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Druo's and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and Diglit call-; responded to at residence, first door 
"west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

* Go-Operative Steam Laundry* 

and Carpal Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, C r^o 'E'A.X^A.lEm 5 ©rr = 
Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

^SATISFACTION GUARANTEED, e/5 2 - 
OFFICE : 

Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge lo and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 

^-SPECIAL RATES.^gSS 

Passenger to center, ------ ioc. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

g or more passengers to Aggie, - - - I5c. each. 

Passenger and trunk, - 25c. 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE, 



tydutti if on Blotnei 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



rtlors, Hettere, Fnqisteis. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACKSON" & OTTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



R-T'TS!' 



Merchant Tailors 



■ AND DEALERS IN - 



READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth S5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, §20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^"Repairing neatly done at short notice. *J^$ 



Ereo. W. Oaigett 3c Da. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 

4-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Hertaiiii 



13/ 



ps, «c> 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE COKFBCTIOWBMY 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN &E 



q 



In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., DECEMBER 11, 1895. 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year. In advance. Single copies. 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-ciass mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY. '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



!%©r@&is. 



We find it our painful duty to again call attention 
to the fact that the management of the Life is in 
great need of the money that is due from subscribers 
and that money we must have if we are to continue 
with the publication of the College paper. We most 
earnestly appeal to all who owe for the past year's 
issue to send us their subscription at once. Let every 
one who owes make it a point to pay at once. 



We have been repeatedly asked, 'What has be- 
come of the Natural History Society," and we have 
not been able to give any satisfactory answer to the 
question. The course of lectures arrainged and pre- 
sented by that society last year were a source of sat- 
isfaction to the directors and were very largely at- 
tended by an appreciative student body. We hope 



that the society will do something of the kind again 
this winter and we feel sure that the College as a 
whole will support any movement of this kind on the 
part of the N. H. S. 



The twenty-seventh volume of the Index will be 
placed on saie at the office of the business manager 
on Thursday, Dec. 12 and will, in many respects be 
the best volume of the Index ever published. The 
board of managers have worked faithfully for the past 
year in preparing this volume and the students and 
alumni should show their appreciation by buying at 
least one copy. That the standard of the previous 
numbers has been high the present board of editors do 
not attempt to deny, but they claim that they have in- 
troduced new features which add greatly to the al- 
ready high standard attained by their predecessors. 
We feel sure that the work will be a credit to the 
College and something which we will all be proud of 
in the future. Get a copy for yourself, one for your 
sweetheart, another for your sister, or your cousin, be- 
cause, nothing which you could give them would be 
so acceptable as a Christmas present as a copy of the 
'97 Index. 



The following notice appeared in the Boston Sun- 
day Herald of this week which does not concern us, 
to be sure, but might well be looked into. "Harvard 
will send a squad to compete for individual prizes in 
the Technology-Brown drill in May. This event will, 
it is said, be the first of its kind ever held between 
colleges." In such a contest as this a picked squad 
from "Aggie" would make a good showing. If the 
fellows think it worth while to try for these prizes they 
should show their desire to those in command, who 
would undoubtedly help on such a cause, and use their 
influence to get permission to enter a squad for the 
event. G. H. W. 



7 6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



igvCril 



New York, Nov. 30th, 1895. 

To the Editors of Aggie Life, Gentlemen : — 
The recent articles in Life on the condition of the 
college classes as to number and loyalty are of inter- 
est if only as matters of history ; but as portraying 
actual conditions that are detrimental to the institu- 
tion it is good that plenty be published and the whole 
subject thoroughly ventilated. The articles by Pro- 
fessors Plumb and Cooley and Life's editorials have 
been pertinent ; permit my contribution to the collec- 
tion. 

The men who are kicking the most now and growl- 
ing at everything connected with the college, will, 
after graduation, if they have brains and sense enough 
to stay the course out, get all they can out of the col- 
lege and will refer with pride to the fact that they 
have been graduated by M. A. C. In an article I 
contributed a year ago to Life on the Military De- 
partment I referred to an insurrection against Capt. 
Morris ; two of the leaders in that movement were 
eventually graduated and are making worthy positions 
for themselves in the world ; the principles of their 
success in two different professions have been ( 1 ) 
their hard work and (2) their connection with the 
college ; they have literally "milked" their Mother 
Dear for all she is good for ; they connot repay to her 
what she has given them. They are loyal sons of 
their Mother, but what I have stated belongs to the 
domain of facts not conclusions or premises. 1 do 
not know what it is in young men to be so intolerant 
of advice or so much afraid of some one over-reach- 
ing them ; a slight difference of opinion with some of 
the Faculty and the student immediately feels ag- 
grieved and that his manhood and " personal liberty " 
have been infringed upon. When one gets out into 
the world he finds very little of personal liberty ; that 
he has to travel pretty close to a certain path, whether 
he is rich or poor and that he is environed at all times 
by law which must not be infringed. From my short 
experience in the world I am free to state that the 
greatest measure of "personal liberty" I have ever 
had was while I was a student at M. A. C. 

Eighty-two was the first charity class and was so- 
called during its whole term at college. Now the 



whole college is composed of students who are being 
educated at the expense of the State ; I believe I am 
right in stating that the poor blacks now being edu- 
cated by the missionary colleges in the South contri- 
bute far more to the expense of said education than 
students of M. A. C. The former must give some- 
thing and that something is their all ; the latter give 
nothing but some laboratory and diploma fees. The 
question may be pertinently asked, "Would the Far- 
mers of Massachusetts appreciate the College more 
if they had to pay tuition for their son's education in 
it? " I was once told by a former Treasurer of the 
College that unless the education was worth one hun- 
dred dollars a year and the students paid for it, the 
college had better shut up. This man had some 
strange (?) ideas as to education but the fact remains 
and obtains that what one pays for he appreciates. 
The technical schools are filled to overflowing and 
charge high fees. Medical schools earn in fees from 
five thousand up to and over one hundred thousand 
dollars a year ; the great majority of such are not 
endowed. It does seem to me as if the farmer called 
for a good deal and also got a good deal in the line of 
colleges, experiment stations, weather bulletins, etc., 
while the ordinary man whether preacher, doctor, 
lawyer, merchant or manufacturer has to pay as he 
goes along, he gets no literature for nothing neither 
expert examinations and has to depend upon himself. 
This is perhaps philistinism, but when I have heard 
farmers kick and growl about their hardships I have 
thought it would be just as well for them to look inside 
themselves for the trouble. " Complaint is a confes- 
sion of failure," Junius Henri Browne, Century Maga- 
zine, Dec, 1895. 

The late President Clark held that the College was 
a State College ; there is something in a name, 
despite Shakespeare ; I believe that our Alma Mater 
would have had a more prosperous career if it had 
been known as the Massachusetts College ; an institu- 
tion for instruction in the practical sciences, which it 
has always been ; I stand by the name of the College 
and when people say to me " You are a graduate of 
Amherst?" I reply, "No, lama graduate of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College." 

The College is not an end ; it is only a means ; the 
end is the work of the Alumni. The general cata- 
logue issued in 1886 by President Goodell and Dr. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



77 



Frederick Tuckerman was and is the most important 
publication of the institution. I have heard it highly 
praised as to form and contents. Everyone who has 
ever been connected with the College is under a debt 
to the gentlemen mentioned for this " Record of the 
scientific work of the college and life histories of the 
alumni." Quotation marks mine. That the work 
should be published triennially goes without argument. 
It certainly should be issued sometime in 1896; in 
the last ten years there has been great activity among 
the alumni and former students, to say nothing of the 
building, equipment and Faculty. If the farmer will 
not appreciate the College, scientific men will and will 
send their sons to it for an education. I have always 
bought an Index, but I had rather pay out my money 
for such a catalogue than for an Index. The trustees 
should publish such a catalogue as early as possible 
in 1896 and put them where they may be reviewed 
by the great newspapers of the country. Sell them 
to the alumni at cost, i. e. not at a dollar a piece but 
as many as a dollar will cover the expense of, beyond 
the expense of paper, which is very cheap, it costs 
but little more to print ten thousand than one thou- 
sand copies. We can do good with them. 

John A Cutler, M. D., '82. 



THE VOYAGE AND EARLY SETTLEMENT OF 
OUR PILGRIM FOREFA THERS. 

One beautiful summer morning late in July in the 
year 1620, a large company of persecuted and 
oppressed people gathered on the wharf of a pretty 
little seaport town, on the western coast of Holland. 

After many hot tears had been shed, and many 
sorrowful and aching hearts had been pierced by the 
tenderness of the farewell words of the dear ones 
who were to be left behind, and by those who just 
embarked in a little ship which was anchored near by, 
the word was given by the commander, and five brazen 
cannon standing serenely on the deck of the ship, 
opened their terrible mouths and gave vent to their 
feelings with a final salute that shook the vessel from 
bow to stern. 

Hardly had the echoes from the cannon ceased to 
fall on the ear, when the crew began to draw up the 
anchor, and the proud little ship, — amid the mingled 
words of departure and the waving of kerchiefs, — 



spread out her snow white sails to a gentle eastern 
breeze, and moving peacefully and gracefully out of 
the port of Delfthaven she sailed swiftly through the 
strait of Dover, and down across the English Channel 
towards Southampton, a seaport on the southern coast 
of England. 

Having mentioned the year 1620 in connection with 
the departure of this little vessel from Delfthaven, it 
is almost unnecessary to say that this identical ship, 
the Speedwell, whose name is held so dear by all true 
American citizens, contains an embryo that is des- 
tined to spring up in America's free sunlight, and grow 
into the most powerful nation that the world has ever 
known. 

The Speedwell, true to her name, sails speedily 
onward for a few days, and, as she nears the wharf at 
Southampton, having borne her precious burden in 
safety for two or three hundred miles, she is received 
with shouts of gladness from those who are crowding 
upon the wharf, and have patiently awaited her arrival. 

After a happy meeting of friends and relatives on 
shore, the little embryo, — for in fact it' was small, con- 
sisting of less than fifty souls, — is enlarged by enough 
more worthy friends who embark in the Mayflower, 
which is near by, to increase the number to one hun- 
dred and twenty-one. The fleet consisted of two 
small vessels ; the Mayflower, the capacity of which 
was one hundred and eighty tons, and the Speedwell, 
having a capacity of only sixty tons. These little ships 
encountered the mighty waves of the cruel Atlantic, 
and bravely pushed their bows against the strong billows 
aiming to reach the other side of the ocean. There, 
their passengers were to make a settlement far from 
the land where kings rule, and where at that time, 
their lives, even among the treacherous Indians, were 
virtually safer than in European countries. 

The fleet had not sailed many miles, however, 
before the Speedwell sprang a leak, and, after an 
unsuccessful attempt to repair it, the two vessels 
changed their course, and in a short time were well 
on their way to Dartmouth for repairs. In a short 
time all necessary repairing on the Speedwell had 
been done, and then, for the second time, the two 
ships sailed out of port determined to reach the goal 
for which their ambitions yearned, — America. 

Everything went on well for many miles, but the 



7 8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Speedwell was a rather rickety, poorly built ship, 
which, — having sprung a leak once, — was a subject for 
suspicion and fear, and, as its passengers and crew 
watching from the deck, saw their native land growing 
fainter and fainter, and the high waves rolling up on 
all sides of the ship, as it sank into the great yawning 
troughs, their courage deserted them, and they wished 
to turn around and sail back, Only a few more miles 
had been sailed, and they were three hundred miles 
from Land's End, a cape at the southern extremity of 
England, when Capt. Reynolds of the Speedwell pre- 
tended that his boat was unsafe, and so the fleet put 
back to Plymouth. Twenty persons went ashore, and 
the remainder, one hundred and one in number, 
crowded into the Mayflower and set sail for America 
September 6, 1620. The company of Pilgrims then 
consisted of about seventy men, and thirty women, this 
estimate including several boys and girls. 

What great faith in religious liberty, and freedom, 
was displayed by a few persons so pluckily crowding 
into a small ship, and risking their lives against the 
powerful ocean waves, and the fierce winds ! What 
great courage our Pilgrims forefathers must have had, 
to undertake such a long journey as that across the 
Atlantic, and with such rude nautical instruments as 
existed, and were available at that time ! Did they 
not value religious freedom highly ? Would they 
suffer what they did for anything less than freedom ? 
For many years they had been cruelly persecuted, and 
had even been deprived of the right to worship God 
as they wished ; and for many years they had sought 
for a place where they might govern themselves, and 
where they would not be under the rule of kings, 
— but in vain. They had scarcely anything they 
could call their own ; we do not wonder that they 
became desperate and would bear it no longer. Their 
voyage across the great Atlantic was indeed very dan- 
gerous ; they were tossed about by the strong waves, 
and came near capsizing many times. One person 
died during the voyage, and, as they were far from 
land, his funeral services were held at sea and witnessed 
by a group of sad friends and relatives. Out on the 
lonely and boisterous sea, many miles from land, his 
body was weighted and silently lowered into the dark, 
gurgling waters of the angry deep. 

One child was born on the the Mayflower during the 
voyage, and, at that time, he was probably the first 



child born at so great a distance from land. On their 
passage over, the Pilgrims experienced a very tedious 
time ; minutes becoming as hours, hours seemed like 
days, but many times they knelt down and prayed for 
their safety against the ocean waves, and thus their 
courage was renewed. 

The Mayflower had been sailing on bravely for about 
sixty-three days, when, one bright cold morning on 
the ninth of November, the rise of distant land met 
the eyes of an impatient observer. How his heart 
thumped with excitement and joy ! Land ! Land 1 ! 
Land ! ! ! How his voice echoed throughout the ship ! 
How everyone hurried to the spot to be second to see 
land again ! The deck was crowded in almost an 
instant. They had not seen land for over a month 
and a half ; they had not sailed in vain. What thank- 
ful hearts went up in prayer to God from those who 
now saw ahead of them their new home America, a 
free country. 

We may read history, ancient or modern, where we 
choose, but we will not find one place where settle- 
ments made by an aristocratic people, prospered and 
did justice to its founders. But, on the other hand, 
if we take as an example, any country that has attained 
a good standard in its progress and growth, and search 
out the details of its real beginning, it will only be a 
short time before we shall be convinced that it is the 
working class of people that have built up the power- 
ful nations of the world, and not the aristocracy. It is 
true that the aristocratic element has accomplished 
considerable for the advancement of nations, but the 
true foundation of a nation lies within the scope of 
the honest working-man's hand. 

In our Pilgrim ancestors we had a class of honest 
working men and women. They were bought up on 
small farms, lived rustic lives, and knew how to work 
and what it was to endure hardships. When once 
they carefully, and wisely laid a foundation for 
a new nation, their descendants went on with the 
great and glorious work ; we now have around us, to 
prove what they have done, the United States, the 
strongest country in the world. 

Before the Pilgrims had made any definite arrange- 
ment for their departure from their native land, they had 
obtained a charter that procured for themselves the 
right to settle upon a tract of land which is now 
included in the state of Delaware. But, after they 



AGGIE LIF: 



79 



left the sight of land, they sailed at random many 
times, consequently, they did not know in which direc- 
tion to sail in order to reach their chartered destination. 
When land was seen on November 9th, they were far 
out at sea, and until two days later, were not able to 
ascertain, by the nature of the land, where they were. 
As they approached the shore, which proved to be 
that of Cape Cod, they found that they were too far 
north for their assigned territory, and so sailed south- 
ward, They had not gone far, however, when they 
saw ahead of them a line of perilous shoals, and, not 
daring to go any further, they turned back and anchored 
in a sheltered bay. There in that little bay, while the 
Mayflower lay at anchor, the famous Mayflower Com- 
pact was drawn up, and signed by forty-one men. 

For nearly five weeks most of the passengers stayed 
in the ship, while a small party set out in search of a 
good location for a settlement. On Friday, December 
twenty-second, the Pilgrims set foot on solid rock, 
and, kneeling down, with grateful hearts, they thanked 
God for their safe arrival. To the rock, on or near 
which they landed, they gave the name of Plymouth 
Rock, which, at the present day, is called, by many 
persons, the " Blarney Stone " of New England. It 
was only by mere coincidence, that the Pilgrims 
landed at a place which had already been named 
Plymouth by Smith, when he visited the shores of 
North America a few years before. 

The party lived in the most convenient way until the 
following Monday, when they began to build a house in 
which to live, and store their goods until warmer 
weather. Everything about them looked lonely and 
dreary. The ground was frozen hard, and the weather 
was quite cold, They spent the winter in the best 
way they could, and when spring appeared, fifty-one 
persons out of one hundred and one had been laid in 
their graves. It is said that at one time, there were 
only seven well persons, — hardly enough to bury the 
dead. Only for a peculiar incident, which occurred 
about three years before, many, and perhaps all, of the 
company would have been killed during the first 
winter. In 1617, a pestilence swept over New England 
and took away -nearly one-half of the Indians, who, 
being rather superstitious, thought this plague was 
brought upon them because they killed two white 
fishermen a year or two before. They thought that 
the pale faces had control of the demon, and let him 



loose on the redmen, in order to have their revenge ; 
for this reason they did not dare to molest the white 
settlers for quite a while. 

At the end of the summer of 1621, the Pilgrims, 
by dint of hard work, had cleared twenty-six acres of 
land and built twenty-one houses. After the food and 
fuel had been gathered in for the coming winter, 
Governor Bradford issued a proclamation for a Thanks- 
giving to God. This was the first Thanksgiving, and 
ever since that time this sacred holiday has been 
observed. Once each year, on the last Thursday in 
November, the Christian people of the United States 
observe this day with religious service at the many 
churches, and each family has an unusually bountiful 
dinner served up for the occasion. 

On November ninth, 1621, — the first anniversary 
of their landing, — a ship was noticed sailing towards 
Plymouth ; as it drew nearer it was found to be the 
Fortune, which had on board fifty more Pilgrims. 
Although she was scantily supplied with food stuffs, 
and her passengers would lessen the rations for the 
settlers, yet she was warmly welcomed to the harbor. 

Having accompanied the Pilgrims for nearly a year 
in America, we will now leave them, wishing our 
readers as good success in life's work as our Pilgrim 
forefathers had in laying the foundation for this beauti- 
ful country of ours in which we live. May we all 
realize what a blessing it is to live in a free country. 

c. p. 



THE PRACTICAL SIDE OF RHETORIC. 
We hear to-day a great about the word "practical." 
Men and women are constantly asking each other 
concerning some new idea: "Is it practical?" It 
may be in regard to some new invention, or about 
some special line of thought or study in which the 
age is interested. We end-of-the-century people 
want nothing that is useless ; everything must exist 
for a purpose. This critical attitude has in recent 
years been a prominent characteristic of the Ameri- 
can college student. We hear them crying for more 
specialization in their work as well as for increase in 
elective courses. Commendable as this tendency is, 
it is sometime overdone. We are apt to think any- 
thing practical only as its result is of immediate and 
economic benefit to ourselves. Thus comes about 
the undue haste of many over-ambitious students who, 



8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



in their eagerness to achieve success and fame, feel 
unwilling to put themselves through that general train- 
ing so necessary for their future welfare. They are 
like the zealous athlete who would run a race before 
he has hardened his muscles. 

This popular test of practicalness has brought about 
among students some sharp criticism upon certain 
long established collegiate courses. The study of 
Greek, of Latin, and of various mathematical branches 
are well known illustrations. Other courses, to be 
sure, have fallen under the ban of disapproval, not so 
much from actual criticism as from the failure of 
those interested to perceive any definite result. With- 
out affirming that the study of rhetoric belongs to this 
number, it will be sufficient to say that probably no 
other course exists in our colleges wherein from 
several causes more time is actually wasted, and the 
benefit desired is more unsatisfactory. 

In every high institution of learning, English is in 
some form or other required. Electives in this branch 
of study, where they exist, are designed for special 
rather than for general training. Being a required 
study, therefore, it is evident that they who make it 
so consider it to be practical. Indeed, from its 
being a universally required study in schools and col- 
leges where Latin and Greek are not accounted neces- 
sary, we may say that rhetoric is looked upon as the 
most practical branch of education. 

It would seem almost useless to mention some of 
the practical advantages of a course in rhetoric did not 
the majority of College students — not intentionally, 
perhaps — seem entirely oblivious of those advantages. 

First and foremost, it must be seen that the study 
of rhetoric has to do with every department of life 
that the student may subsequently enter, whether 
mercantile or professional. Rhetoric points out the 
proper use of our mother tongue ; it teaches the stu- 
dent to express himself intelligently. He who is igno- 
rant of this, who lacks the knowledge of how to put 
his thoughts into good form is forever at a disadvan- 
tage among his fellowmen. A poor talker, a poor 
letter writer, in polite society are out of place. To 
those who argue that the necessary standard in this 
line can be obtained without actual study of rhetorical 
principles, but one answer is necessary : experience 
teaches otherwise. 

Again, rhetoric is a personal study. It appeals, or 



should appeal to each student according to his particu- 
lar needs. The paramount weakness in his method 
of conveying thought being pointed out, it becomes 
the duty of this student to overcome that weakness. 
Thus rhetoric becomes a promoter of individuality. 
The student takes the study home to himself ; he sets 
as it were, his own standard. And if he is wise he 
will set himself a standard that is high. Cooperation 
with the instructor, a determination to put himself, his 
individuality to the front, and above all, a realization 
of the truth of that homely saying : " Make the most 
of a good thing," these alone will cause the study of 
rhetoric to appear practical to the utmost degree. 

Finally, by reasons of the innumerable quotations 
and illustrative examples taken from the pages of our 
standard writers, to say nothing of the incentive 
offered the student thereby for becoming more inti- 
mate with these literary men, the student is furnished 
with the key with which he may provide himself with 
topics for entertainment and study later on in life. A 
question put by any instructor to the average class in 
rhetoric in our colleges as to how much general reading 
that class has done or is doing will almost certainly call 
forth an alarming answer. That the scarcity of gen- 
eral readers — of the best literature, by the way — is so 
great is due to little else than indifference. Lack of 
time may of course partly account for this, but not to 
such an extent as to permit us to give it as the chief 
reason for this state of affairs. 

That the student so often loses sight of the practi- 
cal features of rhetoric is attributed, as has already 
been said, to several causes. Most noticeable of all is 
this attitude of indifference. More than anything 
else, this mental condition toward the study in ques- 
tion is to be decried. The recitation room is no place 
for the idler. Besides wasting his own time he is a 
positive hindrance to those around him who desire to 
get some tangible results from the course as offered 
The indifferent student, moreover, whether he wishes 
to or not, always drags the standard below its 
normal level. It would be much better, if it were 
possible, for him to absent himself from his class- 
mates. He is in the way of both student and teacher. 

Another reason why the results of rhetorical study 
are often so unsatisfactory is, the student is prone to 
confine his rhetoric to the class room. This is a 
great error ; and in its way it does as much harm as 



AGGIE LIFE. 



indifference. Designed as they are for practical ends, 
the principles of this study should be followed system- 
atically and continuously. If slang is out of place be- 
fore the instructor, it is likewise objectionable in the 
presence of the classmate. If bad grammar, poor 
spelling, crude sentences, and badly constructed para- 
graphs and essays are to be criticised by the English 
Department, they ought likewise to be examined by 
the student under other circumstances. 

In a word, the student should create a sentiment for 
the study. He should entertain a real and potent de- 
sire to surmount his failings. He should look into 
his daily conversation, his letters, and his oral and 
written work in other departments of study. In short, 
he should make rhetoric of practical value. Once 
started in the right direction, the student would never 
regret the change. h. b. 



"oiicgf P©tf|» 



flotes ar«d ^ommervtf. 

Begin the New Year right. Leave off smoking, 
borrowing and getting trusted. If you have none of 
these vices take care that you don't get into bad hab- 
its ; go to church, attend Sunday-school, and contri- 
bute for the foreign missions. But above all.form the 
resolution that you will pay your subscription to the 
Life. 



In attempting to find a certain article which we 
knew was printed in a recent issue of one of the lead- 
ing Sunday papers, the writer was obliged to spend 
several minutes in locating the object of his search, 
and it occurred to him, that the editor who would get 
up a Sunday paper which contained news only, would 
find the public very ready to patronize it. When the 
Sunday paper contains so much that does not interest 
the general public, and the important news items are 
hidden in some obscure place in its columns, and so 
much prominence is given to advertising and articles 
of fashion, the busy man of the world, naturally enough, 
turns from its crowded columns and asks himself if 
there is a paper printed on Sunday which gives any 
news. Let some enterprising man start a Sunday 
paper on a common sense basis and the suffering pub- 
lic will say, "well done." 



— Index out to-morrow. 

—A. D. Gile, '99, has left College. 

— Fletcher, '96, took a flying trip to Boston last 
Saturday. 

— M. E. Cook, '97, has left College temporarily on 
account of sickness. 

— Dr. Walker attended the meeting of the National 
Grange at Athoi this week. 

— How about our winter meets? If taxes are not 
paid more promptly nothing can be accomplished. 

— Prof. C. H. Fernald has recently been elected 
President of the American Entomological Society. 

— The senior division in Horticulture will study 
fungous diseases this winter with the division in Botany. 

— Dr. Stone will deliver a lecture on "Plant Growth" 
at Sterling, Mass., near the close of the Winter Term. 

— A copy of the '96 Index has been presented to 
the library in the native towns of each member of the 
class. 

— The '97 Index will be put on sale to-morrow and 
is sure of a good sale among the students. Alumni, 
do your duty. 

— Prof. H. B. Adams of John Hopkins University 
has presented the College with a portrait of Lord Jef- 
frey Amherst. 

— Union Lecture Course to-night; subject, "Ani- 
mal Intelligence," by Prof. John M. Tyler, Ph. D. 
of Amherst College. 

— The Freshmen are practicing polo in the Drill 
Hall. We hope to see some good class contests on 
the "Lake" this year as in the winter of '93. 

— The Department of Vegetable Pathology is con- 
ducting investigations to ascertain the relative value of 
fungicides, also to determine the species and nature 
of the various forms of fruit not found in our markets. 

— The '96 class canes have arrived and add a new 
dignity to that august body. To us, however, they 
only suggest how fast the time is fleeting, and how 
soon we shall say good-bye to Aggie and each other. 
A realization of this should stimulate us to renewed 
efforts in making the most of what little time remains. 



82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The third drawing of the Whist Club is as fol- 
lows : Courtney and F. H. Read vs. Edwards and 
Nutting ; Moore and Harper vs. Barrett and Goess- 
mann ; Barry and Dutcher vs. Barclay and J. W. 
Allen. 

— The opening concert of the Glee and Banjo Club 
in the chapel was well attended and appreciated. Dur- 
ing the corning Christmas vacation the three concerts 
postponed from the Thanksgiving recess will be given 
at Warren, East Brookfield and Ware. 

— We hope the question of Junior electives will be 
brought up and considered at the next meeting of the 
trustees. Every student is in sympathy with this 
movement and would esteem its adoption as a great 
advantage, both to themselves and the College. 

— A petition to the trustees is now circulating among 
the students asking that the date on which College 
has hitherto opened in the fall be extended to Sept. 
20th or later. It is very evident that the hot, muggy 
weather of early September is not wholly favorable to 
men of studious habits, as we are, and for this reason 
it is asked that the date of opening be extended. Oth- 
er colleges have recognized this fact long before this 
and we hope our trustees will give the matter serious 
consideration. 

— The winter meeting of the State Board of Agricul- 
ture was held at Dalton Thursday and Friday, Decem- 
ber 4th and 5th and was attended by Pres't Goodell, 
Dr. Goessmann, Prof. Brooks, Prof. Fernald and Dr. 
Lindsey. The morning session Thursday was devoted 
chiefly to a paper by Dr Lindsey on "How the Agri- 
cultural College and Experiment Station benefits the 
farmer." 

— Those who attended the morning service at the 
Amherst College Church, Sunday Nov. 24th, were 
rewarded by a forcible and eloquent sermon from that 
great reformer and greater preacher, Dr. Parkhurst of 
New York City. No divine in the country is more 
prominently before the public to-day than is he, not 
only for what he has accomplished, but for the great 
power and personality of the man himself. Unfortu- 
nately, he was unable to be present at the afternoon 
meeting which was a grievous disappointment to the 
large number who had gathered in the hope of listen- 
ing to the great preacher, 



— The question, "Should the government own and 
operate the railroads" was discussed last Friday by the 
senior class in a very interesting debate. Speakers, 
for the affirmative, Nichols and Nutting; for the neg- 
ative, Pentecost and E. W. Poole. The weight of 
argument and merits of the question were best decided 
in the negative. After the debate v/as closed Prof. 
Mills added a few conclusive arguments for tne nega- 
tive. These debates are an excellent training in the 
oral expression of thought in a clear and systematic 
manner. The first debate of next term will be on the 
question, "Should municipal suffrage be extended to 
woman?" There should be no lack of arguments on 
either side of this subject. 

— There has recently been presented to the library 
a fine steel engraving taken from the celebrated paint- 
ing of Paul Delaroches, "Napoleon at Fontainebleau" 
just before his abdication in 1814. The original 
painting is now owned by the French government and 
is admitted to be the finest portrait of "The Man of 
Destiny" in existence. The engraving now in our li- 
brary is an excellent reproduction of the original. It 
was presented by the following gentlemen who have 
been Military Instructors at the College at some time 
in its history. Pres't H. H. Goodell, Capt. H. C. Al- 
vord, 10th Cav., Capt. A. H. Merrill, 1st Art., Lieut. 
A. A. L. Totten, 4th Art., Lieut. V. H. Bridgman, 2nd 
Art., Lieut. G. E. Sage, 5th Art., Lieut. L. W. Cor- 
nish, 5th Cav., Lieut. W. M. Dickinson, 17th Infantry. 

— Senior privates are now having target practice in 
the gun shed and will continue through the winter. 
Unfortunately, the government did not see fit to pro- 
vide pistols for this purpose so the regular Springfield 
rifle is used with a cartridge containing but five grains 
of powder and a proportionally small bullet. The 
range is 60 feet with a target 12 by 14 inches, painted 
white and graduated by black lines into circles like the 
regulation target for out-door practice. A man 
stands inside a partition a little to the left, and after 
each shot reaches out through a small door and paints 
off the mark of the bullet. The target and all sur- 
rounding parts are sheathed with cast iron plates 
against which the bullet flattens and falls to the ground. 
The highest individual score made thus far is twenty- 
three out of a possible twenty-five, but entire accura- 
cy cannot be secured with so short a range and so 
small a quantity of powder in the cartridge. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



83 



— The annual report of the College will appear as 
usual near the middle of next term and will contain, 
in addition to reports from the various departments, a 
paper by Prof. C. H. Fernald, entitled "The Crambi- 
dae of North America," including descriptions, obser- 
vations and plates of every known species of this fam- 
ily in America. The plates accompanying this article 
are engraved by a Boston firm and are said to be the 
finest exponent of the engravers art ever published. 
Wonderful progress has been made in this direction 
during the past few years. The report will also con- 
tain an article by Prof. Metcalf outlining the work and 
objects of his department particularly the course in 
civil and mechanical engineering in the Senior year. 
The Mathematical Department is very ably filled at 
present. We have been especially fortunate in secur- 
ing the services of Prof. Metcalf whose large practical 
experience in his subject cannot but make it of the 
greatest interest and value to all. We prophesy that 
the Mathematical Department will be a favorite in the 
choice of Senior (and Junior?) electives next year. 

— "Five unexcused absences having been reported 
against you, I am," etc, has been showered right and 
left lately without diminishing to any perceptible de- 
gree the popular vice of cutting. And why should we 
not cut once in a while? When we came to College 
we had hoped to lay aside the demerits and tardy 
marks of our boyish days, and to be put on our honor 
as men and faithfulness as students for the perform- 
ance of the necessary duties of College life. But no, 
we are still striplings, incapable of judging what is best 
for our own interest, unworthy the confidence and 
trust of our instructors. Compulsory chapel, com- 
pulsory attendance at recitations are the only means 
by which our wayward step may be guided into the 
paths of knowledge and virtue. And so we have un- 
excused absences, which we heeded little ; first and 
second warnings, which we heeded less ; interviews 
with professors for the purpose of excuses, till the 
whole system becomes nothing but a petty annoyance 
and irritation to both instructors and students alike, 
resulting in very little good and a great deal of harm. 
Give us a system of cuts, such as has been adopted at 
every other institution professing to give a liberal ed- 
ucation ! We will not abuse the privilege, nor do we 
believe that it would diminish attendance at College 



exercises or interfere with class work. There are oc- 
casions when a student feels that his time might be 
spent to better advantage in other work than is sched- 
uled for that particular hour. We believe that he 
should be at liberty to regulate his work, to some ex-'* 
tent, according to his own interests and not be re- 
quired to answer for every absence or tardy mark 
which may be placed against his name. In a college 
of our size and character, voluntary attendance at all 
college exercises would be impracticable but we do 
believe that the adoption of a system of cuts would be 
both practical and beneficial. Give us the right, as in 
other colleges to cut a tenth of our recitations, and it 
would soon be seen how few would ever reach the lim- 
it. There are men in College to-day who cut regu- 
larly simply to get rid of an irksome duty, making up 
the most improbable excuses for their non attendance. 
They have their fifty or sixty excused and fifteen or 
twenty unexcused absences in one term, What shall 
we do with such men ? Simply make the penalty for 
over-stepping the regulation ten per cent, so severe, 
that they will be obliged either to leave College or 
turn over a new leaf. The advantages of this system 
over the present are self evident, We hope the fac- 
ulty will give this matter a little careful thought. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The Rothamsted Experiments, by Lawes and Gilbert. 
In this book are contained illustrations of the Rotham- 
sted Experiment Station and portraits of Lawes and 
Gilbert, together with an account of some of the 
agricultural investigation conducted by them. The 
principal experiments treated of are those in regard to 
crops grown continuously on the same land, the fixa- 
tion of free nitrogen, rotation of crops, and the feed- 
ing of animals. From the length of time that these 
experiments have been carried on and the reputation 
that they have obtained they should prove of much 
interest to all students of agriculture. 

Studies in the Evolution of Animals, by E. Bonavia. 
The author of this volume gives some interesting ideas 
on the development of animal life, discussing especial- 
ly the meaning of the spots and stripes of leopards, 
jaguars, and other mammals. He supports the theory 
that existing mammals descended from carapaced 
ancestors, and believes that when the armour-plates 



8 4 



AGGIE LIFE. 



disappeared, they left their stamp on the skin of the 
animal in the shape of rosettes, stripes, spots, and 
other markings. A chapter is included on " Monstros- 
ities " as probable factors in the creation of species. 
The book is fully illustrated and very interestingly 
written. 

The Characteristic Curves of Composition, by T. C. 
Mendenhall. This little volume discusses a novel and 
interesting method of comparing the writings of dif- 
ferent authors. A portion of a book by any author is 
separated into groups of words of equal length, and 
from the relative sizes of these groups, a line is 
plotted out which is called the author's curve of com- 
position. It is claimed that these curves do not vary 
beyond reasonable limits and that by their means 
questions of disputed authorship may be solved. Illus- 
trations of the curves of several well known writers 
are given. 



Tbe Senior class at Brown has petitioned the 
faculty to abolish term examinations. 

The senior law students at Wisconsin have decided 
to wear full beards in place of caps and gowns. 

A new building which is to be erected for the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York will be ten stories 
high and will cost $700,000. 

The fraternities at Dartmouth have drawn up reso- 
lutions in which they agree not to pledge or say any- 
thing about fraternities to new men before November 
20th of each year. 

Oxford is considering plans similar to those of 
German Universities, whereby graduates of other 
universities may take advanced degrees without 
passing lower examinations. — Harvard Daily Crimson. 

The Pennsylvania State College has taken the first 
steps toward the establishment of a University. The 
institution has been divided into seven schools with a 
dean at the head of each ; viz., Letters and science, 
Mathematics and Physics, Natural Sciences, Engi- 
neering, Mines and Mining and Agriculture. 

The Purdue Exponent issues a " Thanksgiving 
special " which is exceedingly interesting, especially 
from an athletic point of view. It contains numerous 



halftones and engravings of football teams and indi- 
vidual players besides a very complete review of the 
football season at Purdue. We have yet to find a 
football issue comparing with that of Purdue. 

As the exchanges of last week come in each seems 
to contain to a greater or less degree the same joyful 
spirit of Thanksgiving, hospitality and good-will. The 
poets neglect their long haired heroes of the gridiron, 
likewise their blue eyed damsels, and wreak their 
vengeance on the suffering gobbler. Even the weary 
editor forbears for a brief season to caution the fresh- 
men and dun the delinquent subscribers, preferring to 
dwell on " the pleasures of returning to the paternal 
home, there to join in happy reunion around the old 
hearthstone," and therefore as one by one these 
Thanksgiving messages arrive we feel like saying 
with all our heart "long live the good old New Eng- 
land holiday." 

Though not particularly appropriate to the season, 
still we could not fail to notice the following complaint 
taken from one of the western exchanges. Perhaps 
some of us can appreciate the feelings of this suffer- 
ing poet who writes. — " Backward, turn backward, 
Mamma Time, in your flight ; feed me on gruel again 
just for tonight. I am so weary of sole-leather steak, 
petrified doughnuts, vulcanized cake ; oysters that 
sleep in the watery bath ; butter as strong as Goliath 
of Gath ; weary of paying for what I can't eat, chewing 
up rubber and calling it meat. Backward, turn back- 
ward for weary I am ! Give me a whack at my 
grandmother's jam ; let me drink milk that has never 
been skimmed ; let me eat butter whose hair has 
been trimmed ; let me once more have an old-fash- 
ioned pie and then I'll be content to curl up and die." 

" I would rather send my son to hell than to Yale." 
This statement made by a clergyman's wife of New 
Haven has been much criticised, particularly by 
college papers. The following taken from the Williams 
Weekly expresses very well the feeling of the average 
college student in regard to the matter. — The Russian 
proverb which says " the hair of a woman is long but 
her wit is short" has never been indorsed by Am- 
erican public sentiment. There is, however, a strong 
temptation to apply it in the case of that clergyman's 
wife in New Haven who expressed her opinion on the 
subject of Yale College by the terse saying that she 



AGGIE LIFE. 



85 



" would rather send her son to hell than to Yale." Her 
fitness to pass such a judgment is sufficiently indicated 
by the grouuds of her censure. These are, that young 
men who take tea with the clergymen in their first 
year in college, are seen with " pipes in their mouths " 
in their second year, " and then go down, down, down." 
Such silly commendation from a nervous and narrow- 
minded woman might be dismissed without notice 
were it not for the existence of a widespread im- 
pression that college life is what such women would 
call the " ruination" of young men. This would be a 
serious charge if it were true. Fortunately it is not 
true. No statistics are kept of the comparative 
morality in college and out of college. In the absence 
of such statistics discussion is apt to be fruitless. 
But our colleges aim to reach a higher standard of 
learning and of physical training, but a higher standard 
of character, of patriotism and of morals. It may 
be true that a higher education does not always imply 
a better morality, but it is true that a higher average 
of learning means a higher average of morality. This 
is true of Yale and of all other colleges. If it were 
not true, an education would not be worth working for 
or paying for, and our colleges would be mere whited 
sepulchres. To look at a graduating class is to per- 
ceive the monstrous absurdity and injustice of such 
hysterical charges. 



lumm, 



Alumni and students are requested to contribute to 
these columns. 

'82. — The Alumni will be pleased to read the con- 
tribution of Dr. John A. Cutter on one of the preced- 
ing pages of this number of Life. 

'82. — C. S. Plumb, Professor of Live Stock Indus- 
try and Dairying in Purdue University; La Fayette, 
Indiana, was one of the two judges of Live Stock at 
the Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlan- 
ta, Georgia, Nov. 6 to 19. 

'85. — Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait has recently been 
elected a Vice President of the American Orthopoe- 
dic Association. 

'88. — Wm. M. Shepardson spent the latter part of 
Thanksgiving week visiting his old friends in Amherst. 



'90. — F. W. Mossman of Westminster, Mass., 
spoke before the Grange of Gilmanton, N. H., Dec. 6, 
on a Creamery topic. Mr. Mossman's address has 
recently been changed from F. N. Atkinson, Wis., as 
above. 

'91. — M. A. Carpenter was in town a few days last 
week. 

'94. — The address of C. F. Walker is 69 Lake 
Place, New Hav«n, Conn. 

'95. — W. L. Morse has recently changed his ad- 
dress to Middleboro, Mass. 

'95. — H. L. Frost spent a few days at the College 
last week. 

'95 — F. L. Warren, has entered the University 
of Penn. Medical School, class of '99. Address him, 
U. of P. Medical School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



"f 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains (barged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



• RR1 

AMHERST, 



MASS. 



86 



AGGIE LIFE 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
1 1-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Satanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to !2 m., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston &. Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09, 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 a. m. 

Returning leave Worcester at 1 1.15 a. m., 2.25. 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 a. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m.. 5.19, 8.30 p. M. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20. 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m.. 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., goinS 
south leave Amherst at 8.01. 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 11.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 1 1.46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 A. M., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 




■^^=sfe /5 



The PhotograDher from Boston 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



BUBS wok melius IF HAM. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 

146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



JUL/ 



Dnni D 



AFjD AND FOOL pjQf 






THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St., 



Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Mveny, peed and Boarding Stable 

Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 164. 

Pleasant Street, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Cla9s and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A„ J. SCHILI^ARE, 

108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL AND WOOD . 

THOMAS 0. DZLL01T, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



WARD AND READING PARI 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



■ GO TO ■ 



1895. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC BTUDIO 



FOR THE BEST YVoKK. 



Society, Class and Group Hlork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



J. L. U 



E 



E. K, BENNETT 

Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

Jfl. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 



C 



Cutler's Block, 



"Steffi? n 

Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 

S. X. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AMD GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



STRINGS FOB VIOLIN, BANJO km GUITAR. 



Cuslpiiajf s f*$mk Store, 



NO It Til A MPTON. 



P. CAMPION, 



.di. 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



sS^SiSaSSSaSSSSiKS^^SajiSOSSEsfESS^Er^ 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 





NOKTHAMPTON". 




FINE CLOTHING 

AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS_& CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



3BKsa®^3-j-^'>K-- vs ■ ■■■- 



Boy ttie Latest Farm faieni and late Honey. 

Bo yon know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found In the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 




SM" fc 



Ci rculars 



110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and plantiug the same, free on application. 



162 Trout St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



AT THE 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



icton Horses and Southdown Sleep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. 1>. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS. ^GRICULTOFjAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, addreSB, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD. 

AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

I'C 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. HICKIM 

DENTAL 



5«r 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 
q to 12 a. hjl., 1-30 to 5 f. ivl- 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. I. CHAMBERLAIN, 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE 

PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IRTXIBIBIBIEB OOOXDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



j&S-Jtepnirhig done ■while you wait.^SS 



1^« 



2 ruwxix ROW. 



inouii &. uucm m, 

BOARDING 



Liverj, Feed and Exchange Stable. 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

Bookseller, Stationer and Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PAKISEAU BROTHERS, 
HAIR DUESSIWG 1©0MS. 

RAZGRS KO.T/HO, barkers' supplies for sale. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



PHAEMACIST. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call J responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steal Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, C E^. PAI/MER 'O^. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

?& SATISFACTION GUA.HANTEED. IS 1 
OFFICE : 

Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 
Barge to and from ail Trains. 



DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



J^SPECIAL RATES..^ 

Passenger to center, ------ ioc. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, - 40c. 

g or more passengers to Aggie, - - - ]5c. each. 

Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c. 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE, 



Popiilanlg of our Blotties 
is wiial we are Pleased to Si 



$u 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the eoas- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



lOlU, 



Ciottlers, Tailors, paitefs, Fiiitaa 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JilOHSOaf & CUTLER, 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO DHDERWEAR. 

There yon will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



B. 1ST. BLDHIjBTT & SO., 
Merchant Tailors 



AND DEALERS IN - 



READY-MAD, 



LOTHING. 



We give you a -watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^""Repairing neatly done at short notice. ^g3$ 



an 



p.. 



BUY YO'JR SUPPLIES OF 



FOUNTAIN PENS. 
Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



-4-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, to.4- 

STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



FKESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 



Y 9 



In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 



1896. 



NO. 8 



wj* 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96. Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96. Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER. '96. College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97. Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



'i&lS. 



The Student of Jan. 1 1 calls attention to the fact 
that we should take all possible precaution against 
being mistaken for Amherst College. We most hear- 
tily agree with The Student in this, but we would ask 
when and where any organization of this institution 
advertised in a manner that would lead the public to 
believe it was an Amherst College organization ? We 
do not wish to be understood as posing on Amherst's 
reputation. We are not doing so and never have been. 
We will, however, speak of our college as the Amherst 
State College, or the Mass. Agricultural College, or 
the Amherst Agricultural College as we see fit, as we 
are of the opinion that it is outside the province of 
The Student to say what we shall call ourselves, or our 
college, so long as we do not intrude on our neighbors, 
or our neighbor's rights. 



The question of having a physical trainer at the 
college has been brought to the attention of the faculty 
repeatedly, but it is evident that we are as far from 
having one now as we ever were. It is not necessary 
to point out the need of such an addition to our 
instructors, it must be evident to every thinking man. 
We are continually defeated in athletics and it is not 
to be wondered at when we stop to think of the lack of 
training our men receive. We ask for appropriations 
for this and that and never feel that we should provide 
some means for the proper training of the physical 
man. Would it not be better to ask the Legislature 
for four or five thousand to fit up the gymnasium and 
employ a physical instructor than to ask for money to 
buy additional land with when we have a large tract of 
unclaimed land on our hands now. Let us hope that 
the future has something in store for us in the direc- 
tion of physical culture. 



The action of our faculty in abolishing the new rule 
requiring all students examined to attain a mark of 
sixty-five in that examination, and in returning to the 
old system of marking will meet with the hearty com- 
mendation of every undergraduate. This action was 
taken in response to a petition from the two upper 
classes. We understand that some of the points 
brought out by this petition were briefly as follows : 
that the new rule encouraged "cramming," that a 
man's daily efforts during the term should affect his 
standing at the end of the term to a greater extent 
than an examination of one or two hours ; that a man 
well acquainted with his subject may fail to do him- 
self justice while working under a time limit ; that 
while a man's daily work was averaged with his ex- 
amination when there was a possibility of its lowering 
his rank, it was not so averaged when there was a 
possibility of its raising it ; and also that there are 
good students in college slightly deficient in one 



88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



branch, who would be obliged to leave college under 
this new system. That such a rule, obviously unjust 
and directly contrary to the principles of the eighty-five 
exemption grade, should meet with the immediate 
opposition of all the men in college is to be expected. 
All are glad to see it go. The promptness with which 
our faculty treated this matter is but another proof of 
fairness, and in their interest of the well-fare of the 
students. 



^orvtrlbu'teci, 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

A BRIEF RECORD OF ITS INCEPTION AND MEETINGS. 

Explanatory. At the last annual banquet the office 
of historian was added to the constitution. It has 
been found that much of the history of the club as to 
data collected has been mislaid or lost in the various 
changes of office. This brief record is now published 
through the kindness of the editors of Aggie Life for 
present information and to make a nucleus around 
which to later get together and publish a full history of 
the club's doings. 

The club's inception. The winter of 1882-83 the 
writer was preparing to enter upon his medical studies ; 
Charles S. Plumb, '82 was in New York engaged on 
the editorial staff of the Rural New Yorker ; we were 
thrown much together with also F. S. Allen, '82 as 
classmates and to Plumb should be given the credit of 
first suggesting an alumni association for New York 
city. Nothing was done till the fall of 1886 when 
with- Barret, 75 and Hubbard, '78 I issued a call for 
a preliminary meeting which was held Oct. 27, 1886 
at the Ariston, Broadway and 55th Street. Present — 
S. C. Thompson, 75, Barrett, 75, Phelps, 76, Hub- 
bard, 78' B. S. Smith, '81 , Cutter and Chase, '82, 
A. A. Hevia, '83, G. H. Barber, '85. After consider- 
able discussion and a thorough examination of the 
600 names in the Goodell-Tuckerman catalogue of 
living graduates and former students a list of 74 names 
was made up of those in and about New York city 
and divided amongst those present that personal letters 
might be written to such. 

Barrett, 75 was called to chair and temporary 
officers were elected : Thompson, 72, president ; 



Hubbard, 78, vice-president ; Cutter, '82, secretary 
and treasurer ; and an executive committee to consist 
of vice-president, secretary and Mr. Barrett. Decided 
to call the name of the organization " The Mass. 
Agricultural College Club of New York and Vicinity." 
The executive committee was empowered to make 
arrangements for a dinner to be given during the first 
or second in December. Adjourned. 

The committee made such arrangements and chose 
as presiding officer of the dinner Mr. Dickinson, 74. 



First Annual Banquet, Martinell's, Dec. 10, 1! 

Presiding, Asa Williams Dickinson, 74. 

Acting Choregus, Harry Kirke Chase, '82. 

Guests : President Goodell and Capt. Charles Morris, 
U. S. A. 

Twenty-six members present. 

Blessing by Dr. Wm. E. Bullard. 72. 

Post-prandial. Opened by the chair followed by 
President Goodell who spoke on many matters con- 
nected with the college ; the library and its needs ; 
the agricultural, chemical, anatomical, physiological, 
zoological and pathological departments ; metaphysics, 
economics, literature, etc. That the college was 
doing better work than ever before ; has better build- 
ings more professors and more money. (Long may 
Prexy live and may his shadow never grow less.) 
Then spoke Capt. Charles Morris of Governor's 
Island: trustee Bowker, 71, Somers, 72 of the 
famous crew ; Thompson, 72 with an interpolation of 
President Goodell on Mr. Edward Burnette, Harvard 
and M. A. C. Beach, '82, after a few remarks was 
warmly congratulated by Capt. Morris for ability 
shown in handling the drum corps when the battalion 
paraded in Boston, Sept. 17, 1880. 

Barrett, 75, had by this time become so uneasy 
because of President Goodell's appeals for money to 
clinch the $10,000 promised on conditions to the 
library, that he started the hat round the room ; Mr. 
Bowker subscribed $100 and the remaining $300 was 
shortly raised. (This was a lovely thing for the library 
but came near killing the club ; a few years later a 
clause was placed in the constitution absolutely forbid- 
ding any assessment or collection of funds at the 
annual dinners.) 

More speeches Drs. Bullard, 72, Benedict, 74 
and Tuckerman, 78. Mr. Barrett, 75 described the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



89 



origin and purpose of the club and Mr. Bowker of the 
work of the Boston association. It was decided to 
have a dinner annually and no rules or regulations be 
made ; the name to be as adopted at the temporary 
meeting. Nominating committee reported three 
members to serve as executive committee with power 
to choose their own officers. 

Second Annual Meeting and Banquet, Clark's, 
Dec. 9, 1888. 

Presiding, Joseph Francis Barrett, 75. 

Guests: Ex-President Stockbridge, Major H. E 
Alvord, Capt. Morris, Prof. Charles L. Harrington and 
Dr. F. M. Hexamer of the American Agriculturalist. 
Eighteen members present. 

Blessing by Mr. Charles E. Lyman, 78. 

Post-prandial. Opened by the chair. President 
Stockbridge spoke at great length about the college 
and the "boys" and was enthusiastically received. 
Professor Alvord described the condition of the various 
departments very interestingly. Dr. Hexamer said 
that this banquet was a revelation to him ; he did not 
realize what a working power the college was. 

Professor Harrington spoke of the condition of the 
college in its early days when he was a student at 
Amherst ; how much the college was looked down 
upon and that its progress had been rapid and wonder- 
ful. Mr. Dickinson, 74 closed the speaking of the 
evening, of which there had not been as much as in 
the first banquet. Much time was spent in persona) 
intercourse rather than general speaking. When it is 
remembered that some of those present had not been 
in Amherst for eighteen years while their love for the 
institution is as strong as those closely in touch with it, 
it cannot be denied that M. A. C. is a power for the 
cultivation of high feelings. 

Third Annual Dinner and Banquet, Clark's, 
Dec. 14, 1888. 

Presiding, Samuel Clarence Thompson, 72. 
Acting Choregus, Harry Kirke Chase, '82. 
Guest ; Rev. Henry W. Parker, D. D. 
Blessing invoked by Dr. Parker. 
Present fourteen members. 
Post-prandial. " Here's to Aggie College." 
Speaking opened by the chair. 
Professor Parker said : He had looked forward to 
this dinner with a great deal of anticipation. A pro- 



fessor's life was not always a pleasant one but the 
annoyances were after all small. He came here to 
see what evolution had done for his past students and 
the results were most satisfactory. He believed in 
the institution and its work, physical and mental and 
gladly paid a tribute to the memory of President Clark 
the man to whom the student could always go when 
in trouble of any kind. 

" There's Music in the Air," was then sung. 

The secretary then reported that at the first dinner 
there had been a balance of four dollars which had 
been voted to the library ; at the previous dinner a 
small deficiency and at this one a deficiency of twenty 
odd dollars because a number had not come who had 
ordered plates. 

Mr. Alfred W. Lublin, '84, suggested that we have 
some organization but not much ; he was not willing 
that the club should die. 

Mr. Asa W. Dickinson, 74, said that this dinner 
was the best the club had ever had ; the numbers were 
few but the spirit of the occasion was great ; he sug- 
gested that the dinner fee be five dollars and on his 
motion it was voted : 

1 . The annual membership fee shall be five dollars 
open to all graduates and non-graduates of the Mass. 
Agricultural college and entitling those that pay to 
a ticket to the annual dinner of the year for which the 
fee is paid. 

On motion of the secretary it was voted that rule 
two should be adopted as follows : The officers of the 
club shall be a president, a vice-president, a secretary 
and treasurer and a choregus to be elected annually ; 
their duties individually shall be those ordinarily 
devolving on such officers ; collectively they shall act 
as an executive committee and transact the business 
of the club. 

(Note. These were the first rules of the club.) 

Music, " My Bonnie :" solo Hubbard, 78, enthusi- 
astically received ; all joined in the chorus. 

Mr. Dickinson followed with general speech pertain- 
ing to agriculture, and the college ; the query, " What's 
the matter with Dickinson ?" brought forth the satis- 
fying answer, " He's all right." And he was; so was 
the club and all present. 

Dr. Root, 76, spoke very earnestly of his great 
pleasure in being at this banquet, his first opportunity 
of dining with the club ; that no matter whether Bos- 



go 



AGGIE LIF 



ton let its dinners slip up a year or not. Doubleday, 
74, and Barri, 75, spoke briefly. 

Tekirian, '85, said that he went to the institution 
almost penniless, had found friends there, had secured 
a good, liberal education and been graduated. 

Hevia, '83, stated that he had entered M. A. C. 
with the expectation of returning to Cuba to take 
charge of his father's plantations. Insurrections and 
wars had changed affairs and now he was using the 
scientific education of M. A. C. in the business of life 
insurance, and would be pleased to help any member 
in need of protection. He was followed by Hubbard 
and Foot, 78 ; Chase, '82, and Barber and Howell. 
'85. Mr. Thompson, in closing the more formal exer- 
cises, thanked the club for their kindness to him as 
president ; he paid a tribute of respect to President 
Clark's memory, and said that while Professor Parker's 
statement was probably true, that valedictorians are 
rarely heard from, the ciub had certainly heard from 
him that night. 

Thus closed a most enjoyable evening ; much talk ; 
much singing ; much love expressed for our Alma 
Mater, and very much of the best fellowship. The 
piano was ably attended to by the acting choragus ; 
besides the numbers noted, there were sung. The bull- 
dog, solo, Hubbard and Foot ; Quilting party, solo, 
Hubbard ; Polly Wolly Doodee, Jingle bells, Soldier's 
farewell, Roll, Jordan, roll, The two roses, Stars of 
the summer night, Paddy Duffy's cart, Goodnight 
ladies. 

Fourth Annual Dinner, The Arena, Dec. 17, 1889. 

Presiding, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82. 

Choragus, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78. 

Guests: President Goodell, Prof. W. P. Brooks, 
from the college; Capt. Morris, Lieut. Totten, Prof. 
Parker, Prof. Harrington, formerly of the faculty, and 
Ephraim Cutter, M. D., LL.D., (Yale '52). 

Blessing invoked by Dr. Parker. 

Twenty-one members present. 

Post-prandial — Opened by the Chair, followed by 
President Goodell, on the college ; his remarks were 
high-spirited and joyous ; they struck the keynote of 
the evening which was maintained till adjournment. 
Professor Parker followed ; Lieut. Totten read a very 
carefully prepared paper on the Military Department 
and the work of the graduates and former students. 



Professor Brooks, from manuscript, placed the club 
permanently on record as to the esteem and affection 
in which it held the memory of the late President 
Clark. Professor Harrington, speaking to " The Rule 
of Three," said much of value as to the mathematical 
department, and that there should be a chair of exper- 
imental physics at the college. Dr. Ephraim Cutter, 
Yale '52, told why he sent his son to M. A. C, to 
obtain a practical education in the sciences and to be 
near great teachers that the college afforded in Clark, 
Goessmann, Stockbridge, Goodell and others ; he said 
that the experiments of President Clark on the power 
of protoplasm in growing plants was the finest of work 
in physics and did very much to call attention to the 
college. Other speakers were : Trustee Bowker, 7 1 ; 
Col. Dickinson, 74; J. F. Barrett, 75, on commerce 
and agriculture ; Dr. Root, 76, on " Dr.? Geo. H. 
Barber. '85, the first alumnus to enter the commis- 
sioned service of the United States Navy." Herbert 
Myrick, '82, on the agricultural press. 

(Note. — This re-union entertained the largest num- 
ber of guests ; when the full history of the club is 
published, the papers read will be given and make very 
valuable reading.) 

(To be continued in our next.) 



THE BOOK MARK. 



Long long ago in youth's sweet day. 

When Autumn winds were sighing. 
I wandered through the forest wide 

Where lay the leaflets dying. 

T'was here we met in the golden time. 

Here words of love were spoken ; 
And ere we parted you gave to me 

A leaf as friendship's token. 

A leaf of gold and crimson and brown — 

Fair memory to me ever. 
Of a golden day in a faded past 

When I walked with love together. 

The years have fled and youth is o'er, 

Long since did its glory perish— 
'Mid the withered dreams of days long dead, 

One token I fondly cherish. 

Here in my favorite book it lies, 

And here as the sunlight flitters. 
The Autumn leaf of long ago 

In gold and crimson glitters. 

Ah ! the days of youth were Autumn leaves 

Of the rainbows colors blended. 
In the book of my heart one day shall remain 

Till the seasons of life are ended. 

—P. T. O'Reilly, '96, in The Purple. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



9> 



0§lG< 



;? 



ox*$. 



— C. Sastre, 1st year, has left College. 

— W. D. Hinds, '99, has been appointed assistant 
librarian. 

— Professor Babson has an article in Outing for 
January. 

— Dr. Walker is lecturing to the seniors on our 
National Finance. 

— Baseball practice in the gym. will commence near 
the middle of the term. 

— Guard Mounting has been introduced in the ex- 
ercises of the Battalion. 

— Alumni, begin the new year right by paying 
your subscription the Aggie Life. 

— F. W. Barclay, '97, has left College for the term 
to teach at his home in Kent, Conn. 

— C. A. King, and M. E. Cook, '97, will not return 
to College till the middle of the term. 

— Prof. S. T. Maynard will lecture before Littleton 
grange Jan. 14, on "Roads and Roadside Improve- 
ments." 

— Six Juniors are taking an elective course in Bot- 
any under Dr. Stone. One step toward Junior 
electives. 

— Hastings, the '96 class photographer will be in 
town Jan. 18 for the accommodation of those desir- 
ing extra sittings. 

— Professor Brooks delivered a lecture before an 
institute at Lunenburg, Mass., Saturday, Jan. 11., 
subject, "Japan ; its farms and farmers." 

— The class of '98 has elected the following offi- 
cers for the term : Pres't, A. Montgomery: vice-pres't, 
G. H. Wright ; sec. and treas., C. G. Clark. 

— The day of prayer for Colleges, Jan. 30 will be 
observed as usual. Pastor Huckel of the Village 
Congregational church will address the College. 

— On Thursday evening, Dec. 12th, the senior di- 
vision in Chemistry passed a very pleasant evening at 
the home of Prof, and Mrs. Charles Wellington. 

— The winners of the Whist Club tournament for 
last term were F. C. Barclay, '97, and H.S.Court- 
ney, '99. Preparations have been made for another 
contest this term. 



— The Glee and Banjo Club gave a successful con- 
cert at Warren, Mass., Dec. 19. Other engage- 
ments are expected at Belchertown and North Hadley. 

— As we were going through the reading-room the 
other day, we noticed a picture turned towards the 
wall by some thoughtless student — that of Marshall P. 
Wilder, 

— On Friday, Feb. 10th, two delegates will be sent 
to Williston Seminary to conduct religious services 
there. Later on two delegates from Williston will re- 
turn the greeting. 

— The class of '96 has elected the following officers : 
Pres't, J. L. Marshall ; vice-pres't, H. C. Burrington ; 
sec'y, H. H. Roper; treas., H. T. Edwards; S. at 
Arms, A. S. Kinney. 

— Pres't Goodell has recently distributed to each 
member of the College the Year Book of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture for 1894, a valuable addition to 
the library of any student. 

— Prof. Canavan, patching up cracks in Old Chapel 
during the recent cold snap. — "I would suggest to the 
College that they place the furnace outside and let the 
heat blow in through the cracks." 

— The cattle on the College farm have recently 
been subjected to the tuberculin test by members of 
the Vetirinary division, and have proved to be wholly 
free from the germs of tuberculosis. 

— In connection with the Dairy School, the Senior 
division in Agriculture will have an optional course in 
Dairy Bacteriology under Professor Stone. This will 
be in addition to the scheduled course. 

— The subject for debate in the Senior class, Fri- 
day, Jan. 22, will be "Do College examinations pro- 
mote the intellectual and moral growth of the students. 
Aff., Saito and Sastre ; Neg., Shaw and Sellew. 

— Senior mathematics is in Differential Calculus 
and Hydraulic Engineering, The Juniors are now 
taking Electricity under Professor Hasbrouk, and this 
subject will be dropped as an elective in the senior 
year. 

— The course in Dairying this winter with the Sen- 
ior Agricultural division and 2nd Year Class will be a 
practical demonstration of the methods now common- 
ly used in successful dairying. The equipment con- 
sisting of various types of separators, aerators, churns, 
etc., has arrived and will soon be in working order. 



9 2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The '97 class off icers for the term are as follows : 
Pres't, G. D. Leavens ; vice-pres't, H. J. Armstrong; 
sec-, G. A. Drew; treas., P. H. Smith; captain, C. 
A. Peters; S. at Arms, J. M. Barry; athletic capt., 
L. L Cheney. 

— The Polo Association has arranged a series of 
class contests for the term. The ice is in good con- 
dition and there is prospect of some sport. Prof. 
Cooley has kindly accommodated the students by 
scraping the pond after the late snowfall. 

A part of the Senior English work will be the prepa- 
ration of a newspaper article for the Aggie Life. The 
three articles decided upon by the board of editors as 
showing greatest proficiency in English Composition 
will be printed in successive issues of the Life later in 
the term. 

— The 2nd Year class has elected officers as fol- 
lows : Pres't, E. W. Capen ; vice-pres't, J. A. Davis; 
sec'y, R. P. Coleman; treas., H, P. Dickinson; S. 
at Arms, Wms. Eaton ; cap't, F. E. Barrett ; read- 
ing-room director, L. R. Alexander ; athletic cap't, 
L. E. Lincoln ; polo cap't, B. Stedman. 

— The Boarding Club directors elected at the close 
of last term are as follows : Pres't, P. A. Leamy, '96 ; 
vice-pres't, W. L. Pentecost, '96 ; sec'y and treas., 
J. L. Marshall, '96 ; 4th director. J. L. Bartlett, '97 ; 
5th director, C. A. Peters, '97 ; 6th director, R. D. 
Warden, '98 : 7th director, M. H. Pingree, '99. 

— It was found necessary to make so many changes 
and corrections in the printed schedule that a new one 
was required. As the faculty, not having the time or 
means to revise and publish a second schedule, the en- 
terprise was undertaken by the students, and the con- 
tested paste-boards may now be obtained at Allen 
Bros'., for the small sum of three cents. 

— The Natural History Society began the terms 
work Friday evening, Jan. 8th with a very interest- 
ing meeting. Two well-written papers were pre- 
sented by P. A. Leamy, '96, and H. T. Edwards, '96, 
the subject of the former being, "The discovery of 
ether and its introduction into surgical operations," 
and of the latter, "The conviction of prisoners by 
chemical analysis." The program for the term will 
consist of a series of popular scientific lectures by 
both faculty and students, 



— Professor Brooks will be present at and take 
part in the meetings of the Ontario Creameries Asso- 
ciation on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. He 
will respond to the toast "Our Neighbors" at a ban- 
quet Tuesday afternoon, and in the evening will ad- 
dress the association on "How to keep up the fertility 
of the farm." Again, Wednesday evening his sub- 
ject will be, "The education of the farmer." 

— Remembering the success of the military ball 
last winter, we hope to see it repeated if possible dur- 
ing the present term. However willing the spirit. 
College life does drag a little during the long winter 
months and some stimulus is needed to keep up a 
healthy activity and cheerfulness. Our social advan- 
tages are so limited that an occasion of this nature is 
very acceptable to the majority of students. We 
come to College for an education in its broadest 
est sense, and no education can be complete without a 
knowledge of society and its duties. We would rec- 
ommend that a committee from both faculty and stu- 
dents be appointed to take this in charge and make 
all necessary arrangements. 

— The military department of the College will be 
represented at a competitive prize drill to be held at 
Mechanic's Hall, Boston, Friday, May 15th at 8-15 
p. m. between Harvard University, Brown University, 
Mass. Institute of Technology, and Mass. Agricultural 
College- Eight or ten cadets showing greatest pro- 
ficiency in the manuel, bayonet exercises and firings, 
will be entered in the individual competitive drill, 
while twenty-seven men, sufficient to form one pla- 
toon, double rank, will represent the College in the 
review preceding the contest. This opportunity must 
not pass unimproved. In the days of '7 1 we won our 
laurels from the Crimson, and to-day, if the good old 
College spirit be once awakened, there is no reason 
why we should not win fresh honors from our old op- 
ponents. Our military department is under the com- 
mand of a thorough and competent officer from whom 
we may expect the best of training. It should be a 
matter of College pride not simply to present a credi- 
table appearance, but also to win for her the victory 
and the honor. The fortunate man will not only gath- 
er honor unto himself but also to the institution which 
he represents. For the honor of old Aggie and the 
spread of her fame we hope to see conscientious work 
in the Military Department from now on, 



AGGIE LIFI 



93 



We have always held and do still hold that the 
presence of the Two Years course in our curriculum 
has not and could not strengthen the College or ex- 
tend its influence. Although a trial of but two years 
may appear superficial, yet in that short time we have 
detected its true nature and observed its influence. 
The trustees have seen fit to drop the course and they 
are wise. In itself the Two Years course is a good 
thing but this is no place for it. Another matter brought 
up in the recent meeting was the omission of Latin 
as an entrance requirement. This action cannot but 
result advantageously to the general welfare of the 
College. Next year we will see a class of sturdy 
farmers boys, for whom the College was originally de- 
signed and to whom we look for our future leaders in 
Agricultural pursuits. Not one country lad in ten 
could pass the Latin entrance examination as it has 
stood for the past two years. If by this means he is 
debarred from entering College and partaking of its 
benefits, then the College has lost sight of the funda- 
mental end and aim of its existence. The trustees 
had the best interests of the College at heart in their 
decisions as time will show. 

— At a recent meeting of the trustees the following 
business was transacted. It was voted to discontinue 
the Two Years course when the present 1st Year class 
has completed its work. Latin was dropped as an en- 
trance requirement and as a required study in the 
prescribed course, but was made elective in the Sen- 
ior year. A new elective in advanced English was 
introduced. This does not, as many suppose, drop 
the present required English in the Senior year. En- 
glish will be required in the Senior year, as hitherto, 
but in addition there will be this advanced elective 
course in English and English Literature. A short 
winter course of eleven weeks was established, to con- 
tinue from the first Wednesday in January to the 
third Wednesday in March. This course includes 
Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry, Dairying, Entomolo- 
gy, Floriculture, Horticulture, Market Gardening, 
Veterinary and Zoology. Only the Dairy School will 
be available this winter, the complete winter course 
to go into effect next year. The trustees will ask the 
legislature for the following appropriations : First, to 
build an addition to the Chemical Laboratory of the 
Hatch station, connecting the two north wings, thus 



securing increased laboratory room and additional 
room for storing apparatus. Second, to erect a sepa- 
rate building for a suitable electric light and power 
station. Third, to purchase the Col. Clark property 
of twenty acres on Mt. Pleasant for the use of the 
Horticultural Department. 



GLEE AND BANJO CLUB CONCERT. 
On the evening of December 18, 1895, the Glee 
and Banjo club gave an excellent concert at Warren, 
Mass., before an appreciative audience of one hundred 
and fifty people. The program was substantially the 
same as the one given at the Chapel earlier in the 
season. Although the work of the Banjo club was 
particularly fine it did not surpass in excellence the 
selections rendered by the Glee club and the solos, 
both instrumental and vocal were well received. 
Following is the program : 

PART 1. 

1. Glee. Footlight Fancy. Ezechiels. 

2. March. Normandie. Armstrong. 

The Banjo Club. 

3. Quartette. Spin, Spin, Jungst. 

4. Selected. Esperanza, Composed by Mr. Jos^ Canto. 

Banjeaurine Solo by Mr. Jose" Canto. 

Adapted. 



5. Glees, ( Steps Song. 

| Integer Vitae, 



6. Glee, Come Join that Band, Plantation Melody. 

The Glee and Banjo Club. 
Intermission. 
part II. 
I. Selected. On the Mill Dam. Babb. 

2 - Glees. | ^ n e k e in s g onT g ' C ° llege S ^ 

3. Waltz, Santa Rosa. Burke. 

Mandolin Solo by Mr. Ysidro Canto. 

4. Glee. Night is Still. Clark. 

5. Selected, Tabasco March, Chadwick. 

Banjeaurine Solo by Mr. Jos^ Canto. 

6. Glee, Lullaby and Good Night, Brams. 



LOVE SONG. 
1 shew'd yon love's crown of gold 

Fair wrought — but you would not wear it. 
Love's sceptre your hands might hold 

And rule but you would not bear it. 
Love's prize of delight untold 

But you would not share it. 

Love's crown by the wayside lies, 

Love's sceptre of gold is broken, 
Love's heart in the darkness cries 

For a word or a look or a token 
For the light unborn in your eyes, 

And the word unspoken. 

—Gabriel Gillet, in U. V. Cynic. 



94 



AGGIE LIFE. 



o-tes and ^ommervtf 



A few weeks ago, the Amherst Student published an 
editorial regarding the confusion of names of the two 
colleges in Amherst, in which our glee club was ac- 
cused of advertising as the Amherst Glee Club. This 
week the Student publishes an editorial in reply to a 
letter sent by Mr. DeLuce in which he distinctly 
stated that our glee club advertised as hailing from 
the Mass. State College and not the Amherst State 
College. The evident misconstruing of statements in 
the Student's editorials on this matter- show a spirit to 
be deplored, and a feeling of animosity we believed 
long since dead. 

* 

* * 

Mutilating books and papers, and the necessity of 
paying the Reading Room taxes are subjects that 
have often been called to the attention of the students, 
but the time has now come when the directors must 
take some decisive action. When eighty per cent, of 
the men in college pay their taxes, why cannot the 
rest of them pay also ? It is a curious fact, too, that 
the majority of this twenty per cent, comes from in 
and around Amherst. There has got to be so much 
money raised every year to keep the thing going, and 
if every man does not help to pay this, he is clearly 
not doing his duty to the college. Some of the stu- 
dents who do not have their mail carried by the Read- 
ing Room association claim that they should not be 
taxed as much as the others. Now the carrying of 
the mail is a small item compared to the other costs 
of the Reading Room, and at any rate, who is there 
in College who, in the course of a whole term, cannot 
get a dollar's worth of instruction and amusement in 
all those papers and magazines. Again some students 
thoughtlessly carry off the magazines. These books 
were all bought at auction at the beginning of the fall 
term, but unless a man gets all of his papers he cer- 
tainly cannot be expected to pay for them. Nothing 
in the Reading Room is to be taken from the place 
and it is the duty of every man in College to see that 

this rule is obeyed. a. m. 

# # 
# 

The Boston Journal of a recent date publishes an 
editorial which cannot fail to be of special moment to 



us and to all who are interested in the cause of 
military instruction in schools and colleges. 

The article appears under the heading, "Our Stu- 
dent Army" and our authority goes on to state that 
during the present year according to War Dept. 
reports nearly 36,000 young men have been receiving 
instruction of this kind in the U. S. and of this num- 
ber 24,000 may be classed as capable of military 
duty, while of 12.500 military duty is required. This 
number, it appears has nearly doubled during the past 
four years and should a like, increase continue during 
the years to come as it is only reasonable to suppose 
it will, the American people need have no fear of any 
danger which might otherwise threaten it on account 
of its men being unacquainted with the principles of 
Military Science or unable to bear arms. 

The importance of this Student Army is, we be- 
leive little appreciated and the influence which would 
be exerted in a time of war little known. It is a 
means of preserving at almost a minium cost the 
strength and efficiency which the U. S. Govt, might 
be called upon to raise in an emergency and a con- 
stant source of security to the American people which 
could not otherwise exist except in the maintenance 
of a large standing army. 

Many of the nations of Europe are reduced almost to 
a state of bankruptcy in supporting their immense stand- 
ing armies and while it cannot be denied that for im- 
mediate service at home or abroad an army of this 
kind is a mighty power, it may yet be called an open 
question whether in the long run a volunteer army, 
officered by men who have received their knowledge 
of the art and science of war in Military Schools and 
colleges might not be fully able to compete with it. 

Let us give due respect to the men who are thus, 
without any ostentation, in reality the great reserve 
strength of a mighty people, a strength which in 
these days when there is so much war talk afloat we 
cannot afford to overlook. w. 



GREAT SCOTT. 
"The stag at eve had drunk his fill," 
And staggered some, as often will 
A stag who's had a horn too much, 
And, like the far-famed, fabled Dutch, 
Has taken Holland gin. To pull 
This story short, the stag was full. 

The Lafayette. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



95 



THE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY. 

The Natural History Society held its first meeting of 
the winter term last Friday evening. The Society lis- 
tened to papers read by Mr. Edwards and Mr. Leamy. 
Mr. Edwards' subject was "The conviction of the 
poisoner by chemical analysis;" Mr. Leamy's, "Ether, 
its discovery and application." The lectures were very 
instructive as v/ell as interesting and were much appre- 
ciated by the Society. 

These meetings will be held throughout the winter 
and at each meeting a lecture will be provided, either 
by one of the students or faculty. The professors who 
have consented to lecture are Dr. Goessmann, Dr. 
Wellington, Dr. Flint, Dr. Lindsey, Dr. Stone, and 
Lieut. Dickinson. The students are W. L Pentecost, 
A. M. Kramer, J. M. Barry, G. D. Leavens, A. S. 
Kinney, N. Shultis, C. A. Peters and J. A. Emrich. 

The directors have worked hard to arrange these 
meetings, and they hope to be rewarded for their pains 
by having a good attendance at all the lectures. If a 
student is interested in any scientific subject he will 
be very apt to hear something of interest to him 
if he attends. If he is not interested in any science, 
he may perhaps, by attending these meetings, 
have a new interest awakened in him which will lead 
to further study in some branch of science. It is not 
a thorough education that a student obtains when he 
goes to college and takes only the course that is 
mapped out for him, but he should endeavor in every 
way to broaden his mind and to obtain all useful 
knowledge. Attending these Natural History Society 
meetings is one way to do this. 

Remember that these meetings are free to all and 
all that the Society asks of you is your presence and 
approval. p. h. s. 



LOVE IN A COLLEGE TOWN. 

Did you ever read the novel 

Written by a Haggard man, 
Where he tells the biggest stories 

Makes us b'heve'm if he can? 

"She's" the story I refer to, 

Largest yarn 1 ever heard, 
'Though I wouldn't have you tell it, 

Some folk believe it every word. 



'Tis another She 1 write of, 
Tis the She whom all admire, 

'Tis the She who is so charming 
That to her all hearts aspire. 

I will grant that She was pretty, 
Tall and graceful, kind and sweet, 

But this was no earthly reason 
For the Juniors at her feet. 

There were two of all her lovers, 
Who were worse than all the rest. 

Whose unhappy looks and voices 
Spoke the trouble in each breast. 

Name of one was Harry Seller, 

Of the other Teddy Lane, 
And they strove with mighty valor 

For a smile from She to gain. 

Harry Seller took She riding, 

And She sweetly smiled and said. 

" Do you know, my spoonlet Harry. 
That in books I've often read 

That the world is vain delusion. 

All desire or love is sin. 
All who hope to gain affection 

Are most sadly taken in." 

Grieved and hurt, the spoonlet answered, 
" She, the loved one of my heart, 

Let me tell you — only tell you 
My devotion e're we part," 

There was silence for a moment 
While the Junior grew quite hot, 

But She said, in accents freezing, 
" Being is and naught is not." 

Teddy Lane took She out coasting, 

On the swift toboggan slide ; 
The toboggan went and left them. 

On the crust they gaily glide. 

Naught said Teddy Lane of loving, 
Naught of hoping, joy or woes, 

For he saw his idol sliding 
On ner pretty Grecian nose. 

"Are you hurt, O She, my darling? " 
Cried the love-sick Teddy Lane. 

" None can ache," said She still sliding, 
" For we only think of pain." 

And then She slid, and slid, and slid, 

Until she reached the moon, 
Where now She lives upon green cheese, 

And watches Juniors spoon. 



9 6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



A NEW SCIENCE. 

It has long been thought, perhaps known, that the 
last object a persons eyes were focussed upon before 
death left an impression upon the retina. Working 
upon this knowledge the authorities in France have 
gone so far as to condem and execute a man from 
the image on tfhe retina of the eye of a supposed 
murdered person. The image is reproduced by means 
of the camera. 

The name of a Mr. Rogers, stands prominent in 
all that pretains to photography. This man discovered 
that by staring hard at an undeveloped plate in a 
dark room and thinking deeply all the time, he was 
able to produce on it a curious figure of no particular 
shape. After considering the phenomenon for some 
time he reached the conclusion that if he were to 
think upon some particular object he would get a 
definite image. 

Acting upon this hypothesis, he sat for forty five 
minutes and gazed at the plate all the time thinking 
of a shilling. Upon the development of the plate an 
image was found which might resemble anything 
from a shilling to the rising sun. This partial success 
encouraged him to further trials and in these he was 
accompanied by other men in order that no trickery 
could be alleged. The object of his thought was now 
a postage stamp and the developed picture showed 
two whiteish discs, the centre of each being occupied 
by an oblong dark space with a suggestion of a head 
upon it. 

What this discovery may lead to is of course only a 
matter of supposition at the present time, but who 
knows that we shall some time by some method 
compel suspected criminals to gaze upon a sensitive 
plate and think over their past life, and then from the 
image developed we may base our judgement as to 
whether they be innocent or guilty. The name to be 
applied to the science is Psycography. e. w. c. 



In studies I do find 

Taking notes is my bent, 
Because it doesn't tax my mind 

To any great extent ; 
While quizzes are to me, 

Of all things most abhorent. 
Because, as you often see, 

My brain is not absorbent. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 
Vathek. An Eastern Romance. By William Beck- 
ford. The first edition of this little book was published 
more than a century ago. It consists of the history 
of a tyranical Eastern Caliph, who for his many crimes 
was finally brought to the place of eternal punishment. 
The story is highly imaginative, being based upon 
Hindoo and Arabic mythology and has been praised 
also for its correctness of costume and beauty of 
description. The closing scene possesses a gloomy 
grandeur comparable with that of Milton or Dante. 
As a work of imagination, Vathek is deservedly popu- 
lar, and the style and strength of its composition have 
obtained for it a place in standard literature. It is 
Beckford's greatest work and one that gives him a 
high rank among romantic and imaginative authors. 



lumm. 



'87. — Augusto Luiz de Ahurida and Eliza Leite 
married at Rio Janeiro, November 23, 1895. 

'92. — The engagement is announced of H. E. 
Crane to Miss Charlotte L. Sargent of Quincy, Mass. 

'92.— W. I. Boynton, 365 Main St.. with Dr. Mor- 
gan, Springfield, Mass. 

'92.— J. E. Deuel, 216 Washington St., Boston, 
Mass. 

'92. — J. B. Knight, teacher, Southwick, Mass. 
'92.— M. H. Williams, M. D. V., Office 170 Bond 
St., Lynn, Mass. 

'95. — We are pleased to publish this little anounce- 
ment that has recently come to our notice, and we 
wish those concerned the best of success. May all 
those having work done in this line patronize them. 
H. L. Frost & Co., 

21 South Market St., 

Boston, Mass. 
Harold L. Frost. Henry A. Ballou. 

"Messrs. Frost & Ballou wish to announce to the 
public that they are prepared to destroy all kinds of 
insects, to treat fungus diseases, and to prune trees 
and shrubs in accordance with the most approved 
scientific methods. References and full information 
furnished on application." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



97 



Since her foundation Yale has graduated 16,265 
men; Harvard, 19,225 and Princeton, 8,733. 

Emperor Francis Joseph has accorded permission 
to women to study medicine in the university of 
Hungary. 

High School Graduates will be admitted to the 
University of Chicago without an examination by a 
recent arrangement. 

The New catalogue of Yale shows that a total of 
16,737 men have graduated since its foundation in 
1701, and of these 8,951 are living. 

The oldest college in the world is the Moham- 
medan College at Cairo, Egypt which was 1,100 
years old when Oxford was founded. 

We are pleased to acknowledge the receipt of the 
following new exchanges, The Purple from Holy Cross 
College, the O. A. C. Review from the Ontario 
Agricultural College, and the McGill Fortnignily from 
McGill University- 

We quote the following from the Earlhanite, the 
suggestion is a good one. "Vacation is over and work 
has begun again. The first part of the term is 
generally a time of pleasantries, the latter part a time 
for hard work, even unto the proverbial wailing and 
gnashing of teeth for want of time and the pressure of 
duties. There are theses to write, an oration for 
public, the time and excitement attending the 
oratorical contest, and a host of lesser things that 
nevertheless consume much valuable time. Why not 
turn over another new leaf with the new year, and 
have your thesis, oration and other work well under 
way at the beginning of this term, and avoid the care 
and worry that will attend the latter part of it if you do 
not? Of the three terms of our school year the 
winter is probably the busiest, with its short days and 
long lessons, and it is from past experience that we 
give this bit of advice." 

WHAT THE WILD WAVES SAID. 
Do you hear the ocean moaning, 

Ever moaning sad and low? 
'Tis because that fat old bather 
Stepped upon its undertow. 

— The University Herald. 



THE STAR. 
In the darkness of the evening 

Shot a star across the sky. 
Plunged amid the depths of ocean. 

'Mid the billows surging high. 

Wrapt in solemn meditation. 

I beheld it from afar, 
And remembered the tradition — 

" Dies a mortal, falls a star." 

As it disappeared forever, 

Rose to God my earnest plea — 
"When for me a star falls earthward. 

Let my soul ascend to Thee." 

— In Brunonian. 



CHARLES G. AYRES, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

ii^At Reasonable Frices. ^jff 



MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



BOYS, 

It will pay you to visit the popular shoe store of 

F. W. DEWEY, 

If yoti want anything in the line of 

•FINE FOOTWEAR* 

Such as Brown Cordovan, Enamel and Wax Calf in heavy 
winter shoes. Also, the finest French Patent Leather Calf 
Shoes can be bought at our store. 



161 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



^PRINTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



9 8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
11-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 A. m. 
to 12 M., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m.. for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. M. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston &. Maine. Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware, Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09. 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6. 10 a. m. 

Returning leave Worcester at 1 1.15 a. m., 2.25. 5.58 p. M. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the*Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 A. M., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m.. 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55. 8.05, 8.50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20. 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m.. 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., 
south leave Amherst at 8.01, 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. M. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 1 1 .46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m.. 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



goinB 
5.45, 

going 




JiLfefcal, 



The Photographer from Boston 



~^wppp 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



is§ win for clsss ens, 011C. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 

146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



BILLIARD AND POOL ?JM\i 



*m 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



rne! 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Mve^y, peed and Boarding Stable 

Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 164. 

1'lkasant Street, - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. U. BKOWIn, I). D. S. 


SCHX££ARE'S 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 


OEHNI~T~13"TS. 


108 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 


Cutler's Block, .... Amherst, Mass. 


COAL AND WOOD. 

THOMAS C. BILLON, 


Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. h. 
Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 


HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 






S. A. PHILLIPS, 
Practical! Plumber, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 


LITTLEFIELD'S 






A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 


vBiLLIARD AND READING PARLOR,* 


HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 


OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 






SHEET MUSIQ 

AND 

MUS10 BOOKS. 
STRINGS FOB VIOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAR. 

AT 

CusSpoaarf s /^usic Store, 


1850. 1895. 
GO TO 

LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and Group Iflopk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 

SALE. 


X Ol; TIC AMP TON. 


J. L. LOVELL. 


J. P. CAMPION, 

Merchant Tailor 

Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 


E. K, BENNETT, 

Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

First door from Post Office. 

FINE GOODS. 


Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 


LOW PRICES. 

GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



DUNLAP HATS. MONARCH SHIRTS. 






NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 



AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS & CUFFS. 

FINE NECKWEAR. 



Buy the Latest Farm Machinery and lake Honey. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 

§UPERI0r\.^^ (5fc* SS « 
"Rni iro Vl* write f D r 




110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and plantiug the same, free on application. 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



AMHEEST HOUSE 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



fflassaehusetts Agricultural College. 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 



Mm Horses and SDuiiidown Sheep 



And we heg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO SAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 

SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COOCM I 



AGGIE LIFE. 



e. b. Dickinson, n. n. s. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hodrs : 
9 TO IS A-. */r.- 1-30 TO 5 IP- Mi- 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. M. CHAMBERUIN, 

Livery and Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES. HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE 

PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS.. A FULL LINE OF 

zes-utbibek o-ooids. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



&£~ Repairing dove while yoti tt'rti't,-©8r 
2 1'IMESIX K<J II'. 



M 

er, 



N. 



AR 



ir 



WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLO 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 
HJLIB DRSSSXNG ROOMS. 

razors honed. barbers' supplies for sale. 
Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

no. 1 cook's block, - • amherst, mass. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call > responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

^ Co-Operative Steal Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment 

Aggi© Agent, C. 1^. TFTAI^IVISSK *fr*tr. 



BOARDING 

Livery, Feed and Exchange Stable 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase'a Barn, 



Ainherxt, Mass. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

r& SATISFACTION QUARANTBED.'JG 1 ' 

Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 
Barge to and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



^■-SPECIAL RATES.,^8 

Passenger to center, 10c. 

Passenger to Aggie, - 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

g or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 

Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



He Popiilarily of our domes 
is WQai we are Pleased io See. 



A customer ouce, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct t-tyles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



Ciottierc, Tailors, natters, FnrQlsQers. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACKSQST & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 



GENT 



Uri 



UNDERWEAR. 



There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



E. W. BLOSBETr & CD., 

Merchant Tailors 



- AND DEALERS IN ■ 



READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits marie to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

ggp^Repairing neatly done at short notice. 



Ban. W. Bladgett & Oa. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



LL 



FOUNTAIN PENS. 
Sevmour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



^-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, &c.4- 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE) COKFECTIOHBMY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may And himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 29, 1896. 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97. Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY. '97, Athletics, 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



The second annual military reception will be held 
on Friday evening Feb. 14th, and it is to be hoped 
that every student will lend his assistance to make 
the occasion an enjoyable one for all who attend. It 
is not a class or society affair, but one in which the 
whole college is interested, and it cannot fail, if prop- 
erly managed to be the event of the college year. It 
is designed to fill the long felt want of something to 
take the place of a Junior Promenade and in this col- 
lege the classes are so small that it is out of the 
question to ask one class to bear the expense of a 
promenade at this season of the year. It breaks the 
monotony of the winter term brings the students and 
faculty together and promotes general good feeling. 
Let us all work for the common end, to make the 
military reception of this year a great social event in 
the history of Aggie. 



If the lower classes are to be represented on the 
college paper next year they will have to send in their 
contributions at once. At the present writing only one 
article has been handed to the editor-in-chief from the 
freshman class, and only three from sophomore class. 
The men will be chosen from the freshman class on 
the merits of the work submitted and unless we find 
from such work sufficient proof of the writers's ability 
to warrant his appointment that class will not be repre- 
sented on the Life editorial board and the vacancy 
will be filled from some other class. All contributions 
must be handed to the editor-in-chief before March 4. 
Work that is meritorious will count in the writer's 
favor whether printed or not. 



We would respectfully call the attention of the pro- 
moters of the Amherst street railroad to the fact, that 
the road should pass through the college grounds and 
near the college buildings, instead of going on the 
county road. The advantages to the college would be 
very many and the college authorities cannot afford to 
ignore them and they should make a determined effort 
to get the road to pass directly by the college buiidings. 
There are reasons also, which the company cannot 
fail to appreciate if they but stop to consider them 
and it is our opinion, that it would be mutually benefic- 
ial if an arrangement could be made to have the cars 
pass close to the dormitories. 



Our attention has repeatedly been called to the 
fact that a number of the students absolutely refuse to 
pay college taxes. Now this is not the right spirit for 
a man to show. How can we expect to main- 
tain our college associations without the support of 
every man? Every man should feel it his duty, whether 
he rooms at home or in the college domitory to support 
these associations. If the men will pay their athletic 
tax we can then fit up the gymnasium, but until then 
nothing can be done, There are a few men in college 



100 



AGGIE LIFE. 



who do not pay any taxes whatever ; athletic taxes, 
reading room taxes, polo taxes, football taxes, baseball 
taxes, and also a number who fail to support the col- 
lege publications. These men give as an excuse that 
they don't room in college, and claim that they don't 
derive any benefit from these associations. One case 
has been called to our attention of a man who has 
been in college two and one half years and has never 
paid a reading room tax, while others have had to pay 
between four and five dollars during that time. If 
every man would pay his bills the taxes would not be 
as large, we would not find 80 per cent of the men 
supporting the various associations while the parasitic 
20 per cent derive equal benefits. We hope that we 
will not have to call attention to this matter again and 
that those who are in arrears will settle at their earliest 
convenience. This article is not aimed at any certain 
individual or individuals, but whoever the coat will fit 
please take it to yourself, and ask if it is not your 
duty as a student and as a man to pay your share 
towards the support of our college associations and pub- 
lications. 



OUR CRIMINAL CLASS AND THEIR REFORMA- 
TION. 

Soon after the appearance of man upon the earth, 
came sin and crime also. Since the time of Adam 
crime has been steadily increasing, and at the pres- 
ent time in the United States, there is one criminal 
to every 786 persons. 

In England, Scotland and Ireland the number of 
criminals has been decreasing for the past ten years 
and France has increased her criminals only three- 
fold in half a century. The growth of the criminal 
class in the United States during the past decade, has 
been three times as fast as that of the population, and 
is increasing at a fearful rate every year. If we allow 
this to continue what will become of our free country ? 
What causes all this crime, and if there be a remedy, 
what is it ? We must not, we cannot allow this great 
question of our country's welfare to stand without our 
most careful consideration. 

The causes are indeed many. Unrestricted immi- 
gration, the increase in urban population, man's love 



for money, the lack of education and employment for 
our laboring class ; all these, directly or indirectly, 
promote the growth of crime in our midst, while more 
powerful than all, is that great demon of Intemper- 
ance, resistlessly sweeping its thousands of victims on- 
ward in the path of crime and destruction. 

Let us examine the following facts as reported by 
our National Government. The foreigners of the first 
and second generation in the United States, consti- 
tute one-fifth of our population ; but they fill one-half 
of our reformatories, furnish one-third of our convicts, 
and nearly three-fifths of the paupers in our alms- 
houses come directly from their numbers. 

Since the close of the Civil War, the Negro, also, 
has played a very prominent part in our criminal 
class. The African race comprise about one-eight 
of our population, while in crime it comprises one- 
third. 

Our foreign paupers, are equal in number to our 
native born and colored paupers combined. Thus it is 
very evident that there is a close relationship between 
the decrease in the number of European criminals on 
the one hand, and the increase of our criminals on the 
other. 

Europe has been pouring her paupers and exiled 
convicts into the United States for the last ten years 
at an astonishing rate. She has been using America as 
her almshouse.wherein she disposes of her most unde- 
sirable specimens of humanity. Shall we, citizens of 
this free country, allow this most abominable enfringe- 
ment of our rights to continue ? Shall we permit 
these vagabonds, paupers and thieves to rob us of our 
livelihood year after year ? God forbid ! Let Europe 
keep her breeders of crime at home. If she allow 
her people to come under the protection of our gov- 
ernment, let her see to it that they be people who will 
become good citizens, and return a citizen's true love 
of country, or send those who will at least keep out of 
our almshouses, reformatories and prisons. 

A large per cent, of the various crimes that take 
place every day within the borders of our land, are 
committed by unemployed persons ; persons who, hav- 
ing no work to take up their time, become intoxicated 
and get into the most disgraceful brawls that always 
end in trouble and often in crime and murder. 

Some men will sacrifice friends, religion, character, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



101 



— yes, and risk their lives, for money. Statistics 
show that 75 per cent, of the crimes committed in 
the United States within the last decade, have been 
caused by man's resistless desire for the accumula- 
tion of wealth. 

In the larger cities of the United States many of 
the poor families are crowded, living huddled together 
in a small tenement, often in one dingy, dark 
room. In this hovel, father, mother and children live 
together in the most disgusting filth. This is a fit 
place for the breeding of intemperance, licentiousness 
and crime. Here we find children associated with 
the roughest and vilest of humanity. Can we expect 
them to become good citizens ? No, a person's 
character is largely determined by his environment. 

The population of New York city is 80 per cent, 
foreign, while that of Chicago is 90 per ce nt. foreign. 
Is there any wonder that these two cities are constant- 
ly having trouble of one kind and another ? 85 
per cent, of our criminals come from the cities. 

The poor of our cities upon leaving their homes on 
an evening seek for a free place of entertainment ; if 
they cannot find it elsewhere, they will most surely 
search for it in the saloon. Here, trouble awaits 
them, and crime follows. Our jails are full to over- 
flowing with criminals, and what shall we do with 
them ? The question of prison reform is one of the 
most important of the hour. Our prisons and prisoners 
are without doubt sadly neglected. 

The criminals in our jails should be separated so 
that no communication whatever can be carried on. 
The accused should be separated from the convicted, 
and everything possible done to prevent the vicious- 
ness of one person, from influencing the morals of 
another. Our jail officials should be cautious in re- 
gard to visitors. The friends of criminals should be kept 
in sight, and watched closely during conversation 
with them, lest some scheme of escape be planned. 
Although the prisoners should be treated justly, and 
given plenty of wholesome food and healthy quarters, 
yet they should not be allowed one unnecessary thing 
for their entertainment, except, that it be of such a 
nature as should tend to reform them. Discourage 
them from repeating the offense and give them a 
chance to redeem themselves. The confinement in 
most of our prisons is made so pleasant, that many 
are quite as willing to spend the winter month? in jail, 



as to work for their sustainance outside. Regularity, 
neatness, and morality should be taught as far as pos- 
sible, prisoners required to do certain work daily, 
to keep their person neat, and to attend religious exer- 
cises regularly and often. 

Persuade the prisoner to read the Bible and such 
other literature as will tend to lift him into a higher 
sphere, and allow him to have no other kind. Give 
him a practical education, not forgeting to keep him 
in close touch with religious principles. Teach him 
some trade that he may learn before the expiration of 
his sentence. Let the work in the jails be so ar- 
ranged that the prisoner can comfortably earn a few 
dollars extra, to be given to him when he is released, 
that he need not rely upon charity. Trust him as far 
as circumstances will permit, and then you can better 
depend upon him. If a person of weak morals knows 
you distrust him, he will deceive you sooner or later 
and you will then have reason to distrust him. Inform 
him as to what is right, and show him the great 
pleasure in living as he was created to live. Then, 
his confinement will tend to reform him, and to open 
before him a path leading out of sorrow to the bright 
side of life. In a word, the object of the penal code 
should be to make the criminal dread prison confine- 
ment, to reform him, to prevent further increase in 
crime, and not to punish the prisoner. p. 



Mrs. Hamlin, wife of Dr. Hamlin founder of Robert 
College in Constantinople, writes the following verses. 
The news of the horrible Sassoon massacre she 
received from Mrs. Knapp of Bitlis, which is the near- 
est missionary station to this bloody waste. 

It will be remembered, it is but little more than a 
year ago (August, 1894) since the Turkish regiments, 
by fire, by unspeakable cruelty, by murder, destroyed 
forty-two Armenian villages. It was during the perpe- 
tration of the awful crimes which followed from the 
express order of the Sultan, that the Turkish soldier 
of the palm heard many a time as his sharp sword 
rose over the head of an Armenian woman : " Hissoos 
Nazaretsee come to our help ! " He could not under- 
stand this name for Jesus, for the Turks call him 
" Issa." But being troubled in the mind by the mem- 
ory of those awful scenes, he tells his wife to ask the 
surviving " gidours " (infidels, unbelievers), a disgrace- 
ful name given to the Christians, the meaning of 



102 



AGGIE LIFE. 



" Hissoos Nazaretsee." For, he says, " All the 
women I have killed, died calling upon Hissoos Naza- 
retsee, when they could have had life by simply saying 
' Mohammed is the prophet of God'." 

[From the Advance.] 
"WHO IS THIS JESUS OF NAZARETH?" 



BY MRS. CYRUS HAMLIN, LEXINGTON, MASS. 



[ The Turkish soldier to his wife after the massacres at Sassoon.] 

"Who is this ' Jesus of Nazareth? ' " 
The Mussulman soldier caught his breath, 
And knit his brow, like a man oppressed 
Whom the soft divan hath brought no rest. 

He had come from a field of God accursed ; 
He had fought where devils did their worst! 
The fearful fray he would fain forget — 
In his soul its echoes are ringing yet. 

" Who is this Jesus of Nazareth ? ' 
The women all called his name, in death ; 
And the very children, caught to impale — 
Nay I — not for a woman's ear that tale ! 

" Your blood would freeze at its very fount ; 
Yet the fire up into your brain would mount, 
Till you shrieked at night, when the wind awoke, 
And, shuddering, cowered till the morning broke. 

" Nay, ask no question 1 I know not why 
The women and harmless babes must die. 
'Twas my chief's to order — mine to obey. 
Be it on his head at the Judgment Day I 

"Yes — there was one alternative : 
' Call on our Prophet, and you live ! ' 
But every victim, with dying breath, 
Called upon ' Jesus of Nazareth 1 ' 

"Who is this ' Jesus of Nazareth ? ' 
Does he bear the sword that conquers Death ? 
Must I meet him there, when Azrael calls 
My naked soul to the Judgment halls ? 

" Go — ask the Giaours — and tell me true, 
Who is this ' Jesus of Nazareth ? ' Who? 
I have fought for Allah ! But if He be 
Allah's viceregent— woe is me! " 

Jesus of Nazarath! Lcrd of Life. 
Conqueror of all this world's mad strife ! 
Vengeance for blood that cries to thee ! 
Bow the False Prophet on bended knee, 

Till the Cross shall quench the Crescent's ray 
From St. Sophia to the Gates of Day ; 
And murderous Moslem, with contrite breath, 
Shall call upon Jesus of Nazareth! 



ANNUAL DINNER OF THE MASS. AGR'L 
COLLEGE ALUMNI CLUB. 

The annual dinner of the Mass. Agricultural Col- 
lege alumni club was held at the Quincy House, Fri- 
day, January 24th, and in spite of the inclemency of 
the weather a goodly number were present. Any stu- 
dent now in College who is effected with an attack of 
the "blues," or imagines he is not spending his time 
profitably by remaining at the College should be pres- 
ent at one of these dinners and his disloyalty and 
"blues" would be effectually cured. The represen- 
tative of the Life, who accepted the secretary's very 
kind invitation to dine with the alumni, is inclined to 
believe that there is no other college in the country 
that has as good reason to be proud of her alumni as 
has the Mass. Agricultural College. There are, cer- 
tainly none that are more loyal to their Alma Mater. 

Prof. Geo. F. Mills was the first speaker of the 
evening. He spoke of the growth of the College, the 
work it was now doing, its usefulness and its future. 
He touched the hearts of all the alumni present, when 
with eloquent words he told of the work done by Pres- 
ident Goodell during his connection with the College 
and called forth a stormburst of applause when he 
paid a flattering tribute to the man himself. 

Prof. Chas. H. Fernald told of the evening he did 
not spend in Palmer and put the gathering in good 
humor by relating some very amusing anecdotes. He 
said the College was doing good work and that it was 
training men in the right way. 

Professor Fernald was followed by Lieut. Dickin- 
son of the College, Prof. Chas. O. Flagg of the Rhode 
Island State College and Mr. G, H. Furnessof Boston. 

The following officers were elected at a meeting of 
the club corporation previous to the dinner : President 
W. A. Morse ; treasurer, James R. Blair ; clerk, W. 

E. Sanderson; directors, C. L. Flint, H. M. Legate, 

F. W. Davis. 

A number of new members were voted in. 
We quote the following from the Bostan Journal : 
The annual dinners of this club are very interesting, 
inasmuch as they frequently bring together the two 
ends, as it were, of the educational thread as it is 
spun in Massachusetts — the general or classical, and 
the practical or industrial. Secretary Hill of the Board 
of Education, Secretary Sessions, President Goodell 
of Amherst, Gov. Greenhalge and ex-Govs, Russell 



AGGIE LIFE. 



103 



and Brackett, are ex-officio members of the club, and 
were represented either in person or by letter last 
night. 

President Bowman presided. As the first speaker 
Prof. G. F. Mills of the college was presented, to 
represent President Goodell, who was unable to be 
present, on account of business in Washington. 

Prof. Mills said: "We must broaden the college 
life, if we are to keep pace with the world. This is 
being done, and plans are in process of development 
for further advancement. He referred to the poem 
of Dr. Holmes at Harvard's 200th anniversary, in 
which occurred the lines, referring to the early college 
days — 

" Lord how the Seniors knocked about 
The Freshman class of one." 

Prof. Mills thought this was encouragement to any 
small college, considering Harvard's present status. 

In spite of small classes and discouragement, a 
college would succeed if only it had an object in 
existence and an end of usefulness. 

In closing, Prof. Mills referred to the fact that Pres- 
ident Goodell has been at the head of the institution 
just ten years, and gave an earnest compliment to his 
work and the results of it. His tribute was marked 
by much applause from the appreciative alumni. Pres 
Goodell has been connected with the Faculty ever 
since the founding of the college. 

Then Prof. Charles H. Fernald, professor of "bug- 
ology," as popularly called, arose to speak, raising a 
laugh by an anecdote, the first thing. "More gypsy 
moth than smoke talk has been floating through my 
brain of late," he said. Then he went on giving the 
ex-students many good points about the rest of the 
Faculty. He spoke of the results of the objective 
methods of teaching. They were generally good, but 
sometimes like that attained by a woman of a certain 
School Board, with whom said system was a favorite. 
She was asked to illustrate to a class of children a 
volcano. She used plenty of red and yellow chalk. 
The children, when asked, hardly dared say what it 
was. Finally one small boy raised a hand — "hell," 
he said. Prof. Fernald closed with an earnest word 
for the College. 

Lieut. Dickinson of the Military Department told 
some stories, one about a football player, and was fol- 
lowed by S. C. Damon, one of the College Trustees 



who said he thought the College was in the right place 
and doing right work. It was his ambition to see it 
an original College, and turn out "all 'round men " 

Prof. Charles 0. Flagg, one of the pioneer gradu- 
ates of M. A. C. now of the Rhode Island college, 
brought a greeting from the younger institution. He 
said history had been making fast down in the little 
Rhody, especially at the college. He spoke of work 
there in showing that the soil was too acid for the 
proper growth of plants, which he said got them the 
nickname of "sour soil cranks." 

Among the other speakers were Mr. P. A. Leamy 
of the College paper, Aggie Life, and Mr. G. H. 
Furness. 



The history of nations is but a history of mens lives. 
The same passions, the same desires the same 
endeavors, that actuate the single individual likewise 
govern the body of individuals which make the nation. 
What is the story of France but a tall Napoleon. 
What the treaty of Rome but a record of Julius 
Caesar. We are altogether to apt to consider a 
nation as a lifeless inanimate thing. Something to 
be governed by fixed laws and regulated ideas and 
something more of the attributes or characteristics of 
the individual. 

It is this idea that has led to some of the greatest 
mistakes of history and it is the idea which to-day 
perverts the minds of the many and thus leads to mis- 
conceptions as false as they are dangerous. 

The life of nations is a fascinating study and the 
progress of the world and many are the lessons that 
may be thereby learned. It is one of these lessons 
that we are so much in need of learning that actuates 
this decision of a subject which may seem to be 
already worn threadbare, viz. what does the present 
war agitation mean. And we care not whether it was 
the soul stirring strains of the Marseilles, the soft, 
sweet notes of Annie Laurie or careless, joyful Yankee 
Doodle that inspired the heroes of Waterloo. 



FIN DE SIECLE. 

"As Providence willed, 

By her bicycle killed." 
'Twas thus her epitaph ran, 

"In bloomers and cap, 
Through sad mishap, 

She went to her death like a man. 



-Ex. 



104 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C@!Ie^ flotfs- 



— Tonsilitis and La Grippe have invaded the 
dormitories. 

— Senior theses in Political Economy are due Mon- 
day, Feb. 3rd. 

— The freshmen are having target practice in the 
shooting gallery. 

— Hastings, the '96 class photographer was in town 
Saturday, Jan. 25th. 

— W. A. Armstrong of Cambridge, Mass., has en- 
tered the freshmen class. 

— The dancing class will continue its lessons every 
Tuesday evening throughout the term. 

— B. K. Jones, '96, and L. F. Clark, '97, will rep- 
resent the Y. M. C. A. at Williston, Feb. 16. 

— Pres't Goodell was at Washington a few days 
last week on business connected with the College. 

— Rev. A. L. Squier of the Wesley Methodist 
church exchanged with Dr. Walker Sunday, Jan. 19. 

— Dr. J. B. Lindsey will continue to teach the 
Sunday morning Bible class during the remainder of 
the year. 

— Dr. Walker will open a discussion on "Our Na- 
tional Finance" at Amherst Grange, Friday evening, 
Jan. 31st. 

— The Y. M. C. A. has appointed a committee of 
three to select and purchase new hymn books for the 
Association. 

— Do not imagine that you have done your duty to 
the young lady in question unless you take her to the 
Military Ball. 

— The result of the football election is announced 
as follows: Captain, J. W. Allen, '97 ; manager, C. 
I. Goessman, '97. 

— College will close Wed. March 18, instead of 
Thursday, March 26 as was announced in the cata- 
logue for last year. 

— G. H. A. Thompson, has returned to College fully 
recovered from his unfortunate accident, and has en- 
tered the class of '99. 

— Professor Brooks recently illustrated his lecture 
to the Senior Agricultural division on breeds of cattle 
by stereopticon views of each. 



— The Hatch Experiment station has issued a 
twenty-four page bulletin on "The Agricultural Value 
of Bone Meal" by Prof. Chas. Wellington. 

On Feb. 5th, the members of the Senior class will 
be requested to designate the department in which 
they intend to write their graduation theses. 

— It is surprising to note the number of cousins and 
other more or less remote family connections, which 
have been discovered in "Hamp" since Paradise 
opened. 

— Professor Fernald has recently added to the 
equipment of the Entomological Laboratory a number 
of very fine microscopes for the use of the Senior 
Entomological division. 

— At a meeting of the Scientific club held Friday 
evening, Jan. 17, a paper on "Bone Meal Experi- 
ments" was read by Dr. Wellington, and other sub- 
jects of interest discussed. 

— Dr. J. B. Lindsey addressed a farmers' institute 
of the Eastern Hampshire Agricultural Society held 
at Palmer, Jan. 14 ; subject, "How to feed the dairy 
cow for milk and cream production." 

— At a meeting of the Natural History Society, 
Friday evening, Jan. 17, interesting papers were read 
by A. S. Kinney on "Edible Toadstools," and C. A. 
Peters on "Natural Phosphates in North America." 

— A large per cent, of the Senior class have signi- 
fied their intentions of teaching after graduation, and 
have united with the Beacon Teachers' Agency of 
Boston which has offered very reasonable terms for 
membership. 

— The results of the class polo contests arranged by 
the directors are as follows : '96 vs. '98, 2-1 ; '97 vs. 
'99, 3-1. The Sophomores have challenged the 
Freshmen to a contest but the youngsters appear to 
be a little shy. 

— The Horticultural Department of the Hatch Ex- 
periment Station will soon issue a bulletin to contain 
in condensed form the results of observations and ex- 
periments for the year. The grape and strawberry 
tests are particularly conclusive. 

— On Feb. 13 and 14, examinations will be held 
under the rules of the civil service commission, to 
fill the vacancy of expert agriculturists in the office of 
Experiment Stations, Department of Agriculture. A 
chance for some of the seniors. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



1 05 



— A bill is about to be presented to the state legis- 
lature, authorizing the appointment of a commissioner 
on Peach Yellows, and providing for the extermina- 
tion of that disease in this state. In most respects, 
the bill is similar to that of Connecticut, where its en- 
forcement has already resulted in a decided improve- 
ment in the healthfulness of the peach orchard. 

— The reunion and banquet of the Mass. Agricul- 
tural College Alumni Association of Massachusetts, 
was held at the Quincy House, Boston, Friday even- 
ing, Jan. 24. Prof. Mills represented the faculty at 
the banquet, and Lieut. W. M. Dickinson, Prof. W 
P. Brooks, Dr. G. E. Stone and Prof. R. E. Smith 
were also present. Aggie Life was represented by its 
editor-in-chief, P. A. Leamy, '96. 

— It is a discouraging outlook for the paper when 
so little competition is manifested for positions on the 
next board. From the Freshmen there has been re- 
ceived but one contribution ; from the Sophomores 
and Juniors but very few, and only three more 
issues remain before the new board is elected. If the 
lower classmen will not make this effort out of loyalty 
to the College publication, let them consider only the 
personal advantages to be gained thereby. Freshmen, 
we expect to hear from you. 

— The Senior debate Friday, Jan. 24, was upon the 
question "Do college examinations promote the intel- 
lectual and moral growth of the student?" Affirma- 
tive, Saito and Sastre ; negative. Sellew and Shaw. 
The weight of argument and merit of the question 
were both decided in ihe negative. On Friday, Feb. 
7th, the subject to be discussed will be, "Was the ac- 
tion of Pres't Cleveland in sending to Congress his 
message of Dec. 17th judicious?" Aff., Shepard and 
Shultis ; neg., Tsuda and Burrington. 

— The last entertainment in the Union Lecture 
course was a lecture on Constantinople and the Ar- 
menian question, illustrated by numerous and beauti- 
ful stereopticon views of Constantinople and Armenia. 
It was interesting from beginning to end, although the 
lecturer was evidently prejudiced in many of his views. 
To-night, Mr. W. H. White of Melbourne, Australia, 
will lecture on "A Trip to the Antipodes ; Australia as 
it Was and Is." This is also to be illustrated by ster- 
eopticon views, and promises to be one of the finest 
entertainments in the course. 



— It is to be regretted that the sale of the '97 Index 
is so small among the student body. While we can- 
not give the book unlimited praise, yet we believe the 
class and board of editors deserve commendation for 
producing so creditable a book under such discourag- 
ing and unfavorable circumstances. It is the duty of 
every student to buy an Index, not alone in support of 
the board, but also as a means of advertising the Col- 
lege. Put an Index where it will do the most good, 
in the library of your native town or the homes of 
your friends and mates. 

— The first indoor meet will take place on Satur- 
dap, Feb. 9th. We have so often had occasion 
through these columns to urge the prompt payment 
of taxes, that the subject has become a standby, to be 
brought up and developed when short of notes. But 
the fact still remains, that not over a dozen men have 
paid their athletic tax, and consequently, there can be 
no improvements in the gymnasium till the students 
are more willing to search the linings of their pockets. 
It is useless to expect something for nothing ; to ex- 
pect a creditable gymnasium withont contributing any- 
thing for its support. But this is the same old story, 
and it needs no repetition. Doubtless many have al- 
ready learned it by heart, but if they would only take 
it to heart it would more become them, 

— In connection with the work of the term in Soph- 
omore declamation, essays by members of the class 
will be read each week upon topics connected with 
early American History and Literature. It is intended 
that the essays shall furnish a foundation for the 
courses in Irving and Longfellow to by given during 
the summer term. The schedule of essays, together 
with the dates of presentation is as follows : Feb. 6, 
"The Colonization of Virginia," Adjemian. "Why 
was there no real Literature in Virginia?" Wright. 
Feb. 13, " Captain John Smith, His life and works," 
Baxter. " The Rise of Puritanism in England," Charm- 
bury. Feb.21 ," Why the Pilgrims came to America," 
Montgomery. "The Religion of the Puritans," Nick- 
erson. Feb. 27, " Early Poetry in America," Eaton. 
" Jonathan Edwards, His life and Influence," Warden. 
Nov. 5. " Benjamin Franklin, His Life and Influ- 
ence," Wiley. " King Philip's War," Kinsman. 
Nov. 12, " Causes of the Revolution," Clark. '■ Bos- 
ton Tea Party," Fisher. 



io6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— There is soon to be added to the equipment of 
the Horticultural Department a Marsh Steam Spray- 
ing Pump, made by the Shipman Engine Co. of 
Rochester, N. Y., This is the finest steam pump 
put on the market and its trial will be awaited with in- 
terest, The mechanism is simple and safe. Steam 
is raised by burning oil and a powerful pressure, suf- 
ficient to throw three streams to the height of fifty 
feet, is secured. The tank will hold one hundred and 
fifty gallons, and is mounted on a low truck with six 
inch tires for greater facility in transportation. If all 
claimed for this pump is assured, it will prove of great 
economical value in this line of horticultural work. 

— At a mass meeting of the college held Tuesday, 
Jan. 14, the polo interests for the coming season were 
discussed and the following officers elected ; Captain, 
J. L. Marshall '96; Manager, C. A. Nutting '96; 
Treasurer, J. A. Emrich '97. A tax of 25 cents was 
levied on the college to defray necessary expenses. 
Already a large part of the tax has been collected and 
we see no reason why the college should not put a 
good team on the ice this winter. The first and sec- 
ond teams have been furnished with suits and best 
league sticks, and practice faithfully every day the 
weather and ice permit. On Wednesday Jan. 22d the 
team easily won from Amherst High School in three 
periods of fifteen minutes each. Score, 5-0. A home 
game has been arranged with Storrs Agricultural Col- 
lege of Conn, for next Saturday, Feb. 1st. Another 
game is expected -with a Springfield team. During 
the past two weeks the polo grounds have been in very 
poor condition owing to ice cutting by the farm depart- 
ment but since we understand they are to lend a help- 
ing hand in improving the ice hereafter, there need be 
no cause for criticism. We have the material for a 
winning team if it is only properly developed. 

— We are pleased to announce the arrangements 
for a Military Ball, similar in all respects to that of 
last winter, to be held in the Drill Hall, Friday even- 
ing, February 14th. Two representatives from each 
of the societies in College have been selected to make 
necessary arrangements. They are as follows : D. 
G. K., A. S. Kinney, '96, C. I. Goessmann, '67 ; C. 
S. C, F. L. Clapp, '96, C. A. Peters, '97 ; Q. T. V., 
P. A. Leamy, '96, J. A. Emrich, '97 : P. S. K., M. 
E. Sellew, '96, C. A, Norton, '97. From the above, 



the following committee of committees was elected : 
Chairman, P. A. Leamy ; secretary, C. A. Morton ;. 
treasurer, C.A. Peters. Also the following arrangement 
committees ; Music, A. S. Kinney, M. E. Sellew ; 
refreshments, C. I. Goessmann, C. A. Peters; decora- 
tion, F. L. Clapp, P. A. Leamy ; dancing, C. A. Nor- 
ton, J. A. Emrich. The expense will probably be di- 
vided equally among the various societies. Outsid- 
ers and non-society men will be required to pay ad- 
mission. The faculty and patronesses have kindly 
consented to furnish accommodations for a number 
of visitors, and rooms for others may be easily se- 
cured. We hope no effort will be spared to make 
this occasion creditable and enjoyable in every respect. 



POLO. 

The M. A. C. Polo team defeated a picked team 
representing Amherst high school last Wednesday 
afternoon in an exciting contest by a score of 5 to 0. 
This is the first game of the season for the M. A. C. 
team and it showed some very fine playing. The M. 
A. C. team had the best of the game from the start 
and caged the ball five times before the game was 
over. The game was characterized throughout by its 
clean playing only one foul being made during the 
whole game. The line up was as follows : 



A. H. S. Sl A. C. 










M. A. C. 


Russell, r. 










v. Moore. 


Gibbs, r. 










r. Charmbury. 


Clark, c. 










c. Marshall. 

c. Eaton. 

h. h. Hooker. 


Clutia, h. h. 










Sullivan, g. 










g. Nutting. 


Goal won 


Rushed 








Made by 


1 M. A. C. 


Moore, 








Marshall, 


2 M. A. C. 


Moore, 








Marshall, 


■ 


Russell, 











3 M. A. C. 


Charmbury, 






Charmbury. 


4 M. A. C. 


Moore, 








Hooker, 





Russell, 











5 M. A. C. 


Moore, 
Gibbs. 








Moore, 


Referee. P. A. 


Leamy, M. 


A. 


C, 


'96 


Timer. J. A. 


Emrich, M. A. C., 


'97. Time 3 


15 minute 


periods. 



'95. — A card has been received announcing the 
engagement of Mr. H. A. Ballou to Miss Laura Far- 
well of Fitchburg. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



107 



We wish to commend most heartiiy the action of 
the trustees in dropping Latin from the list of require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman class. This is 
a step in the right direction but we are not prepared to 
say whether it is wise to make it an elective rather 
than a required study of the Freshman year. It is 
very much easier to study scientific subjects after 
having acquired some knowledge of the Latin. Time 
will, however, demonstrate the wisdom of such a step. 
* * 

* 

At a meeting of the Reading Room directors held 
Friday. Jan. 24th, it was voted that every man who 
had not paid up his takes before or on the first day of 
the last month of any term, should have his name pub- 
lished in the college paper ; also that his mail should 
be stopped until all arrears are paid. It was also voted 
that every man in college be taxed one dollar, this tax 
to cover the winter and spring terms. 



We are surprised that those in authority should 
allow the ice on the college pond to be cut away so as 
to prevent the students from skating, or playing polo 
during the winter. We do not object to the farm 
department using what it needs but we do object to 
the cutting over of the whole pond. Not only is this 
pleasure spoiled, but the grounds which are becoming 
a source of pride to every student, are being cut up in 
a scandalous way by the travel over them. This 
would not be permitted on private grounds, why should 
it be allowed here? The pond was constructed for the 
benefit of the college and not for the purpose of supply- 
ing ice to the ruralists who live in the immediate 
vicinity. 



"Oh, ye plains of broad Sahara 

Rich in witchcraft's cunning art 
Pray tell me how to win a kiss 

From her who holds my heart. 
Then the plains of broad Sahara 

Sent an answer to me. and 
This the whole of what she told me 

' Come and get a little sand.' " 



—Ex. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

a brief record of its inception and meetings. 

Fifth Annual Banquet. The Arena, Dec. 10, 1890. 

Presiding, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78. 

Choragus, Joseph Edward Root, 78. 

Guests : Professor Geo. F. Mills, M. A. C, Profes- 
sor Clarence D. Warner, B. Sc. 

Present, twenty-one members. 

Post-prandial. Opened by the chair who extended 
a hearty welcome to the new guests of the Club. In 
speaking of the Club affairs, he stated that it had 
been incorporated to protect the members from any 
foolish officer or officers plunging them into debt. 

Professors Mills and Warner both spoke on and for 
the College and its work. Speakers from the mem- 
bers were Trustee Bowker, 71 ; Col. Dickinson, 74; 
J. F. Barrett, 75 ; F. G. Urner, 77; Herbert Myrick 
'82 and Wm. P. Birnie, 71. A resolution petition- 
ing Congress not to irrigate the arid lands of the 
West, but to allow the Eastern farmer a show, was 
adopted. This resolution was noted favorably and 
adversely in the metropolitan press and went all over 
the country; so it may be said that the farmers of 
New York are not dead. 

Sixth Annual Banquet, The Arena, Dec. 15, 1891. 

Presiding, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74. 

Choragus, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82. 

Guests : Ex-President Stockbridge, Prof. Jas. B. 
Paige, V. S., and Geo. B. Willard, '92, of Aggie 
Life. 

Post-prandial. Opened by the chair who said in 
part, while the institution was a purely Massachusetts 
affair, it stood to-day as the first of its kind in the 
land ; our alumni association may not be as large as 
the one in Boston, but we yield to no one in our loy- 
alty to and the loving memory we cherish for our 
Alma Mater. 

The late Jeremiah M. Rusk, Secretary of Agricul- 
ture wrote, " The extraordinary number of calls upon 
my time at this season make it very difficult for me 
to absent myself fsom Washington even for a single 
day. On this occasion the difficulty is increased 
from the fact that the day selected is Cabinet. It 



io8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



gratifies me very much to know that your college is 
represented by such an alumni association, which un- 
questionably can do and is doing much to worthily 
represent agricultural interests among the residents of 
our large cities, who are only to apt to be indifferent 
to or ignorant of agricultural matters and the import- 
ance of agriculture to the interests of the country at 
large." 

Ex-President Stockbridge and Professor Paige both 
addressed the Club at length on the College and were 
received with high favor. One represented the begin- 
ning of the college and many years of work in it ; the 
other the fruit of the former's work, in that he, a 
graduate, was now a teacher and practicing a profes- 
sion of great importance to the farmer, to wit, of 
veterinary. We wish ex-President Stockbridge 
might be with us at all banquets ; with President 
Goodell, Dr. Goessmann and Dr. Parker, a " Great 
four," is made up of the hardworking teachers of the 
College's first days. All have dined with us except 
Dr. Goessmann and we confidently expect him to be 
with us Dec. 21st, 1896. 

Other" speakers were, E. H. Libby, 74, Geo. B. 
Willard, '92, for Aggie Life, Herbert Myrick, '82 and 
J. F. Barrett, 75. 

Seventh Annual Banquet, Murray Hill Hotel, 
Dec, 7, 1892. 

Presiding, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, '74. 

Choragus, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., '82. 

Guest: Professor S. T. Maynard, '72. 

Present, thirteen members. 

Post-prandial. The chair stated that this was the 
first dinner in which all present were graduates or 
former students of the College. He introduced Pro- 
fessor Maynard as a sterling graduate of the class of 
the class of 1872 and one who had labored in season 
and out of season for the welfare of the college and at 
the risk of his health. Professor Maynard fittingly 
responded ; the work of the college in detail was told 
to us. Other speakers were, Birnie, 71, Benedict 
and Libby, 74, Urner, 77, Peters and Young, '81, 
Cutter, '82, Lublin, '84, and Howell, '85. 

Two resolutions were adopted one endorsing the 
movement for " Good roads " by 'legislation and indi- 
vidual effort and one deprecating the externimation of 
our Adirondack forests as inimical to our water supply. 



Eighth Annual Banquet, Grand Union Hotel, 
Dec. 7, 1893. 

Presiding, Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81. 

Choragus, Frank Gordon Urner, 77. 

Guest: Professor Henry Webster Parker, D. D. 

Theme for discussion : Good Roads. 

Post-prandial. The chair presided with all the good 
grace with which a good doctor can handle any situa- 
tion ; the subject of good roads was close to him as he 
used roads a great deal in driving to his patients. He 
then introduced Professor Parker who spoke at some 
length and to the great enjoyment of all present ; he 
had endeavored in his life to keep on a good road and 
hoped that he was on it and that all of us were travel- 
ling in the same way. Other speakers were Birnie, 
71, Cutter and Myrick, '82, Hevia, '83, Lublin, '84, 
Howell, '85, and Eaton, '86. The theme was noted 
in all the remarks and we learned that Good Roads 
were a broad subject. 

Ninth Annual Banquet, Grand Union Hotel, 
Dec. 19, 1894. 

Presiding, William Perkins Bernie, 71. 

Acting Choragus, Sanford Dwight Foot, 78. 

Guests: President Goodell, Prof. H. W. Parker f 
Lieut. C. A. L. Totten, Prof. Geo. E. Stone, Ph. D., 
'86. 

Fourteen members present. 

Divine blessing invoked by Dr. Parker. 

Theme for discussion : The College. 

Post-prandial. The chair started the ball rolling by 
calling on President Goodell ; the guests followed ; 
other speakers were Thompson and Dr. J. Clarence 
Cutter, 72, Professor Wellington and Jas. H. Webb, 
73, Dickinson, 74, Barrett, 75, Urner, 77, Foot, 
78, Cutter, '82, Lublin, '84, Howell, '85, and Good- 
rich, '93. 

The theme was closely followed ; much was said 
about the possibilities of the alumni doing more for 
the college at commencement time and that more 
opportunity should be given them for special exercises 
during commencement ; also the holding of a fall 
meeting at Amherst. President Goodell showed a 
very interesting chart of the number of students in the 
college since its inception. 

(To be continued in our next.) 



AGGIE LIFE. 



109 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Plant Breeding. L. H. Bailey. This consists of 
five lectures upon the Amelioration of Domestic 
Plants. The author discusses especially the variation 
of plants, the crossing of plants with reference to their 
improvement under cultivation, the origin of domestic 
varieties with rules for plant breding, and the methods ! 
of pollination. This subject is one about which little 
has been definitely known, and in this book it is dis- 
cussed very thoroughly. Prof. Bailey has a wide rep- 
utation as a horticulturalist, and any book written by 
him cannot fail to be of value to all who are interested 
in that line of work. 

Movement. Marcy. In this volume are outlined the 
investigations carried out at the French Physiological 
Station in analyzing the movements of animals. 
These investigations were made by means of chrono- 
photography by which a large number of photographs 
of a moving object are obtained within a very short 
time. Illustrations are included showing the separate 
elements which compose the movements of men and 
horses, the swimming of aquatic animals, and the 
flight of birds and insects. The closing chapter is 
devoted to methods of reuniting these elements of 
the analyzed movement so as to represent it more 
slowly and see more continuonsly than it actually took 
place. 

The Evolution of Horticulture in New England. 
Slade. As a history of New England Horticulture 
this little volume is very interesting. It begins with 
the gardens made by the settlers at Plymouth soon 
after their landing and shows the continual progress 
made in gardening up to the present time. It is writ- 
ten in a concise and interesting manner and is well 
worth the attention of all who are engaged in any line 
of Horticulture. 



&gch&nges. 



THE MOODS. 
I conned a poet's book from page to page, 

And marked the many moods in which he sung. 

And some were early songs, and bold, and rung 
Of love and, passion, and the rage 
Of his wild, violent heart. And some the sage, 

Man-grown had writ , and here it seemed the tongue 

Of mighty genius, free and curbless, flung 
Its priceless thoughts to men. But in old age, 
In the calm Autumn, free from pang or pain, 

then his songs were sweetest to the ear. 



He sang of sunsets in the golden west, 
Of harvest moons and gathered grain ; 
Of heaven, and the hour we tarry here. 
I loved the tranquil songs of age the best. 

— The Minnesota Magazine. 
KNIGHTED. 

All night within the dim cathedral choir 
He watched beside his armor ; vigil kept 
With prayer and fasting while his fellows slept ; 

And as the gray dawn touched the cross-capped spire, 

There came to him a vision. Holy fire 
Of pure devotion up within him lept, 
The song of service through his spirit swept, — 

God's accolade bestowed on lonely squire. 

When the sun shone across the world's new day 

They found him at the Alter. Not a trace 

Of struggle on the fair uplifted face ; 

And as they bore him home they softly trod, 
With reverent feet as those who go to pray. 

He died a squire. Arise. Knight of God! 

— The Weilesley Magazine 
THE GOLFING GIRL. 

She wears a fetching jacket 

Of the regulation hue — 
Gray skirt and natty gaiters 

O'er a pair of number two. 

She uses me for a caddie, 

Yet the work is not so hard ; 
She aims a stroke appalling, 

While the ball goes Just a yard ! 

While every move's a poem, 

And a work of golfing art — 
Her strokes that are strongest 

Are the ones she hits my heart. 

— Yale Record. 

COLLEGE CQ-OPERATiVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note 15ook3, larcest and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 

CHARLES G. AYRES, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

^SrAt Reasonable Prices.,®* 

W. W. EOITMTOK', 

MANUFACTURER OF 

®033^ ^WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



Rivek Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



no 



AGGIE LIFE. 



KINDS OF BICYCL] 



and others* 



There are no untried 
devices in 1396 Col- 
tmibias. Every detail 
has been perfected by 
at least a year's use. 

Beautiful Art Catalogue for 
J896of Columbia and Hart- 
ford Bicycles is free if you 
call upon any Columbia 
agent ; by mail from us for 
two 2-cenc stamps. 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO, 

Factories and General Offices, Hartford, Conn. 

Branch Stores and Agencies in almost every city and 

town. If Columbias are not properly represented 

in your vicinity let us know. 




PURITY 



Speeial Attention Given to famishing Spreads. 



il=C r 



S<5 



• BRINTERS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



HA: 



SidMaL 



esgsfe 



The Photographer from Boston, 



s «r 



»n3 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



IBS WORK FOR GLASS OF 9§. Pi. R. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 
146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



BILLIARD AND POOL PjEO 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St., 



Rarmell, 

- - Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

erv, Feed and 



Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Street, - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. 8. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. E". BROWN, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : 9 a. h. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



impffj 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. J a SCHIIvi,ARS, 

los Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL AND WOOD. 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



SLJ e*ETT 
Si £ra £^> I 

AND 



STRINGS FOB VIOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAR. 



AT 



Cusfimaii's Ausic $!ore 1 



NORTHAMPTON. 



T\ 



Business Suits, $19. 

Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



DEALER in 

(ARD AND FREE BURNING C 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention 

Residence, South Prospect St. 

LITTLEFIELD'S 



s 



^BILLIARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



GO TO- 



1895. 



WELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIG STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and Group Ulork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



J. L. LI 



E. K, B 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 






NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 
AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS & CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



ira^^a^. 



Buy the Latest Farm Machinery and lake Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



.La-nd » «'0 » - 
U>LLEr\, 



* v Write for 



Circulars 




110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and planting the same, free on application. 

13 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



.A-H^EIE^ST' HOUSE 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLL^G^ FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Perclieron ir.es and Soutndown Sleep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. V. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COOCH & SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. XSIEKINSDM", 



U. S. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

TO 12 A.. 3VT-, l-SO TO 5 P. ]VC. 



Ether and Nirous Oxicle Gas administered when desired. 



u. ■ :■■ wiininHkiikniii) 

Livery arjd Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

EUBBEE GOODS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



%&~jRepairing done while you tvait,^& 

T. ^SST. SIvOAN, 

3 PHfENIX BOW. 



mm 



BOARDING 



Livery, Feed and Exchange Stable 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

ookselfer, Stain ail Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HANO TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 
HiUB. DRESSING ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

no. 1 cook's block, - - amherst, mass. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night callj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

* Go-dperattve Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment 

Aggie Ager*.*, C. Si*. PAIUMER 'O'y. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

SN&SATISFACTION GUARANTEETJ. e.'E? 1 
OFFICE : 

Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 



C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge lo and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



^-SPECIAL RATES..,©? 
Passenger to center, - 
Passenger to Aggie, - - - - - 

2 Passengers to Aggie, - - - - - 

3 or more passeugers to Aggie, - 
Passenger and trunk, ... - 



10c. 

- 25c. 

40c. 

15c. each. 

25c 



Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Tie Popularity of om Clones 
s WW we are Pleased to See. 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 






otljfen, Tellore, Halters, Fwpip. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

J&CKBOW & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

ENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There yon will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



BLOBS-ETT & CO., 

Merchant Tailors 



■ AND DEALERS IN - 



READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^—Repairing neatly done at short notice. ^^8 



Ess. 1ST. Bio tott & Co. 



BUY YO'JR SUPPLIES OF 



f"1 



fountain: F"KN®. 

Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



-4-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, to 4- 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 



1896. 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER. '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT. '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to alt subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



One of the Alumni subscribers of Life recently sent 
the following newspaper clipping with a note saying 
that it had reminded him of his indebtedness for this 
year's subscription. We insert it, hoping that it may 
remind others. " Some editor, while musing over the 
' Old Oaken Bucket,' and the scant amount of provis- 
ions in his larder, put together the following pathetic 
lines : ' How dear to my heart is the face of a dollar, 
when some kind subscriber presents it to view ! It 
may come to-day, or it may come to-morrow ; it may 
come from others, or it may come from you. The 
big silver dollar, the round silver dollar ; dear delin- 
quent subscriber, present it to view ! A round, silver 
dollar I hail as a treasure, for often expenses over- 
whelm me with woe ; I count it the source of an 
exquisite pleasure and yearn for it fondly wherever I 
go ! How ardently I seize it — that lovely round dollar 



— the root of all evil 'tis commonly named. Loving 
money is sinful, some good people tell us, but the poor, 
penniless printer can hardly be blamed. The penni- 
less printer, the hard-working printer keeps sending out 
papers that interest you ; so hand in your dollar, 
the big, dandy dollar ; dear reader, now will you pre- 
sent it to view ? ' " Now, subscribers, we mean you- 
Subscriptions to Life are due strictly in advance. 
Some of you are behind two, or more, years. The 
beginning of a new year is a good time to square up 
old accounts and start even with the world. We ask 
for your cooperation in maintaining the present stand- 
ard of the paper. Will you send in your subscriptions ? 



On looking over the college history we find that 
previous to 1883 we had no college library, while to- 
day we have the finest agricultural college library in 
the country. The library to-day compries over 17,000 
volumes. But how was this library started? Was it 
by money received from the state? No, it was money 
received from the alumni and students. Year after 
year we have called the attention of our faculty to the 
poor condition of our gymnasium and we have urged 
that they petition the state government for the money 
necessary to fit up the gymnasium. But alas, we 
find that they care not whether we have a gym. or 
not. We find that the athletic association has adver- 
tised to have the annual winter meet. But how can we 
hope to lower the present records, when the only com- 
plete apparatus we have is a set of traveling rings, a 
pair of dumb bells, and a set of parallel rings. Now, 
the physical development of a man is of just as much 
importance as his mental development, and if it was 
not for the exercise we receive from military drill, the 
student body would be candidates for some consump- 
tive's home. And with this state of affairs our alum- 
ni write and ask why don't we have some victorious 
athletic teams. From the above one can readily see 



112 



AGGIE LIFE. 



why our teams are not victorious. A plant cannot 
grow without food, neither can a student develop his 
strength without necessary apparatus. As we are 
tired of calling upon the state, through our faculty, for 
needed improvements in the gymnasium we would 
suggest to some of our alumni that they start the 
matter by a popular subscription, similar to the sub- 
scription that was started for the building up of our 
present library. And after the gym. has been fitted 
up, then we would have reason to complain if our col- 
lege teams were not victorious. 



M. A. C. is, perhaps, taken on the whole, as near 
perfect as any other college of its kind, but yet it lacks 
a few modern conveniences that an institution of 
half of Aggie's standing ought to be provided with. 
One of the most important of these is the need of 
water in the north dormitory. It is far from pleasant 
for one who occupies a room at North College to be 
obliged to go to South College for all his water ; 
especially at this season of the year. The cost of 
putting the water in would not need to be large, and 
the students rooming at North College would then 
willingly pay a little higher room-rent if there were no 
other way by which the costs could be paid. 



THE VILLAGE WRECK. 
He is scarely they say half-witted. 
His pale face bears this out, 
As he shuffles and limps through the village 
And gathers the refuse about 
The alleys and murky gutters — 
Old papers and peelings of fruit ; 
For street gamin slang and mimic 
A butt unheeding and mute. 
His home ? He has none ; 

And the people who know why his reason has fled 
Give the cold food from their tables 
And a loft packed with hay for a bed. 
To him, when at night fall exhausted 
He creeps up to some kitchen door, 
His sad eyes fearlessly shifting, 
His bare feet soiled and sore. 
You say you would call him sixty ] 
Why man he is half that age. 
His story — you wish to hear it ? 
'Tis sadder than written page. 
I think the year he was twenty 
He took his college degree , 



His people were mighty proud 
Of their only son, you see. 
So they gave him plenty of money 
And dressed him up like a king. 
Where a boy is naturally smart 
This isn't the wisest thing. 

For soon the plain quiet village, 
With its simple country folk, 
Grew heavy and tiresome to him — 
Its life became a yoke. 
To his father's earnest pleadings, 
And his mother's tearful voice, 
He paid no heed, but told them 
Their home was not his choice. 

To a city he went and flourished, 

And rumors now and then, 

Came floating back to his home cot 

Of his life as a public man ; 

Of the wealth of which he was master 

And his hold on public trust. 

Then the good old father and mother 

Thanked God, for they were just. 

One day. at the time of harvest, 
A rumor flew through the town 
That the firm which bore his surname 
Was ruined, and he was gone 
With a hoard of ill-gotten treasures, 
While a wife and infant child, 
Was left to bear the burden 
Of the name he had defiled. 

Mid the whitened snows of winter 
The wife was laid to rest 
With her babe, his injured offspring, 
Pressed close to her lifeless breast. 
While the poor old father and mother 
Oppressed by shame and woe, 
Went down their graves together ; 
Their hearts were broken, you know. 

And then like all such erring 
The wanderer, weak and alone, 
Just for a sight of his dear ones 
Returned — to his vacant home. 
For only two grass-grown graves 
In the city of the dead 
Were there to give him welcome ; 
Is it strange his reason fled ? 

Of men he wronged ? Why mercy 
The hardest among them knew 
For the crime he had committed 
Stern justice had given him due. 
You call it a strange weird story? 
Yes, look, there the hero goes 
With his motley parcel of gleanings. 
He's suffering his limbo ? Who knows ? 



C. I. G. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"3 



(olleg? |^I©tf$. 



— M. E. Cook, '97, will not return to College till 
late in the spring. 

— State Secretary H.J. Armstrong of the Y. M. C. 
A. visited College Feb. 2nd. 

— W. H. Armstrong, '99, has become a member 
of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 

— By a mistake the Junior-Freshman polo score 
was given in the last issue as 3- 1 . It should be 0-3. 

— Prof. Fernald will lecture before Amherst Grange 
May 1st, on "Pleasant Memories of the Old World." 

— Dr. Walker has been re-elected for a term of 
three years as a member of the American Economic 
Association Council. 

— Sabre Drill is soon to be discontinued in order to 
devote more time to the squad which is to represent 
the College at Boston. 

— The Reading- Room Association has levied a tax 
of one dollar on the College to cover expenses of the 
winter and spring terms. 

— B. H. Smith, C. W. Smith and E. H. Sharpe all 
members of the 1st year class have entered '99. We 
hope others may do likewise. 

— Mathews Michels, formerly of the Wisconsin 
Dairy school has charge of the practical work in the 
Dairy school recently established at College. 

— The last drawing of the Whist club is as follows : 
Lincoln and H. C. Burrington vs. Goessmann and 
Harper. The winners play Edwards and Emrich. 

— Two members of the Storrs Polo team remained 
at College over Sunday as delegates to the College 
Shakespearean Club from the associate club at Storr's. 

— Prof. Brooks addressed a farmers institute of the 
Worcester Northwest Agricultural Society held at 
Gardner Feb. 1st on "Manures and Fertilizers, and 
their uses." 

— Dr. J. B. Lindsey delivered an address on the 
"Economic feeding of milch cows" at a meeting of 
the Eastern Hampshire Agricultural Society held Feb. 
4th at Monson. 

— At the Natural History Society meeting last Fri- 
day evening, Dr. Stone delivered a very interesting 
lecture on "Intelligence and Irritability in Plants." 



He showed remarkable skill in treating so difficult a 
subject in so pleasing a manner. 

— Dr. C. A. Goessmann addressed a union institute 
of the three counties and the Hampshire Agricultural 
Society held Jan. 30th at Hadley, on the subject, "A 
rational system of feeding dairy stock," in connection 
with a discussion of some new forage crop. 

— Senior theses in Political Economy are being 
read and discussed before the class. The subjects 
considered thus far have been, ''Should the Green- 
backs be Retired?" by H. W. Moore ; "Free Coin- 
age of Silver," by H. T. Edwards; "Government 
Ownership of Natural Monopoles," by H. C. Bur- 
rington. 

— A committee of three from the Y. M. C. A., 
consisting of B. K. Jones, '96, L. F. Clark, '97 and 
W. E. Chapin, '99, has been appointed to meet simi- 
lar committees from Amherst College and from the 
various churches in Amherst, for the purpose of con- 
sidering what action, if any, should be taken for the 
relief of the Armenian sufferers. 

— There appears to be some misunderstanding re- 
garding the gold medal recently awarded at the At- 
lanta Exposition. It was awarded to the Mass. Agri- 
cultural College for the excellence of its exhibit, not 
to the Hatch Experiment station which is but a part 
of the College or of Massachusetts as a state. We 
want all the credit that is our due. 

— Mr. C. S. Crocker of the department of foods 
and feeding of the experiment station has accepted a 
position with the L. B. Darling Fertilizer Co., of 
Pawtucket, R. I., and will enter upon his duties at 
once. His place in the laboratory will be temporarily 
filled by Mr. C. H. Jones. After April first, Mr- 
George A. Billings will take the position left vacant 
by Mr. Crocker and Mr. Charles Tisdale will take 
Mr. Billings' position in the feeding department. 

— Pres't Goodell has lately been at Washington in 
the furtherance of certain bills which are of vital in- 
terest to the College. Among them is a bill provid- 
ing that graduates of technological schools whose 
course of instruction in mechanical engineering may 
be considered satisfactory by the Director General of 
Naval Engineering and approved by the Secretary of 
the Navy, may be eligible for appointment as engi- 
neer cadets in the Engineer Corp of the Navy. 



H4 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The projected Amherst-Sunderland electric rail- 
way is already a certainty. The $30,000 required has 
nearly all been subscribed and it is expected that the 
charter will soon be granted. Operations will com- 
mence early in the spring and we hope to see the 
road in running order by Commencement, which 
would be a great convenience to our visitors. The 
College authorities should make an effort to have the 
road run by the College buildings instead of by the 
county road as has been planned. 

— I. C. Creen, '94, has offered a gold medal as a 
prize for the best drilled cadet in the manual and fir- 
ings, to be competed for under the same conditions as 
were announced in the prize drill of last year. The 
winner of the last medal will be debarred from this 
year's contest. The drill will probably occur on the 
evening of March 12th and it is expected to follow 
it with an informal hop. Let us welcome every op- 
portunity for the further development of that branch 
of our curriculum which has already proved itself so 
efficient. 

— The Athletic Association has announced the fol- 
lowing events for the indoor meets of the term : 
Feb. 8, potato race, rope climb, 25 yd. dash, standing 
hop skip and jump, flying rings, standing broad jump, 
1-4 mile walk, floor tumbling, three standing jumps, 
and pole vault. Feb. 22, running broad jump, wrest- 
ling, (three classes), light weight 135 lbs. or under, 
middle weight 158 lbs, or under, heavy weight, over 
158 lbs. Sat. Nov. 8, standing high jump, Indian 
club swinging, hitch and kick, parallel bars, running 
high kick, horizontal bar. We hope to see a large 
list of entries in these meets. 

— The senior debate last Friday on the question 
"Was the action of President Cleveland in sending to 
Congress his message of Dec. 17 judicious?" was ably 
discussed by Shepard and Shultis on the affirmative 
and Burrington and Tsuda on the negative. The 
weight of argument and merits of the question were 
both decided in the negative. The next question will be 
"Would the the subversion of the Turkish Empire be 
an advantage to its subjects and to Europe as a whole?" 
Debaters, Cook and Clapp for the affirmative, DeLuce 
and Edwards for the negative. 

— The reception committee has satisfactorily 
completed all the necessary arrangements for the 



Military Ball, and now it is the duty of each student 
to contribute his part towards the success of the oc- 
casion, by his presence with a lady friend. It is ex- 
pected that the Glee and Banjo clubs will render one 
or more selections during the evening. A reception 
will be given from 8-30 to 9-30 followed by dancing 
till one. The patronesses are: Mrs. H. H. Goodell, 
Mrs. W. M. Dickinson, Mrs. Chas. Wellington, Mrs- 
J. B. Lindsey, Miss Helena T. Goessmann. 

— The programme at the Union Lecture Course 
to-night is an address by Rev. A. A. Willits, D. D. of 
Philadelphia, on "Sunshine ; or, How to Enjoy Life," 
Mr. Willits has a national reputation as an entertain- 
ing and instructive speaker. We have often heard 
our pessimistic brethren, suffering from a chronic at- 
tack of the blues, debating among themselves in the 
gloomy recesses of their sanctum, the old, old ques- 
tion, "Is life worth living?" with the inevitable con- 
clusions that it is not. Here is an opportunity for 
these blasted sprigs of the family tree to catch a 
glimpse of that nobler and happier life which only 
comes through self sacrifice and service. 

— A large delegation of students patronized the 
Academy of Music at Northampton last Wednesday 
evening, and the strains of "Old Kentucky" have 
been floating through the air ever since. Although 
many phases of the modern drama may be serverely 
criticized, yet a play of this character should be ob- 
jectionable to none. It is so full of life, and breathes 
so much of human nature, with all the freaks and fan- 
cies to which humanity is heir, that one is at once enter- 
tained, and, if he be a wise man, instructed also. 
Like any other pleasure, theatre going may develope 
into a passion, and this should be condemned, as 
should any other form of intemperance. Yet we be- 
lieve that if one occasionally attends a good play, and 
endeavors to draw from the characters there presented 
a lesson in human nature, he is not, as many would 
have us believe, abusing the privileges or neglecting 
the duties of this life. 

— Another bill which must be passed is one provid- 
ing for "an equitable adjustment of the grants of land 
to the several states of the Union for seminaries of 
learning or universities." On July 13, 1787 Congress 
granted to each of the states formed out of the Public 
Domain, upon its admission to the Union, a portion of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"5 



the public lands within the state for the purpose of 
maintaining a seminary of learning. These grants 
have not been made on an equitable basis, some states 
having received none, some states two townships of 
land and some four or more. The grants thus made 
are in every case altogether inadequate to meet the 
present needs of that form of education which they 
were intended to foster. Recognizing the importance 
of placing the means for thorough education within 
reach of all people in the Union, it is proposed to 
grant to each of the several states a quantity of land 
from the public domain equal to 30,000 acres for 
each senator and representative which that state has 
in Congress. The number of acres in grants which 
the state has hitherto received shall be deducted from 
this amount, and each state shall receive the dif- 
ference between what they would receive under the 
provisions of this act, and the amount of land already 
granted to each for the same purpose. Land granted 
by this act shall be apportioned to the several states in 
sections, or subdivisions of sections not less than 1-4 
of a section, and the Secretary of the Interior is 
authorized to issue land scrip for the amount in acres 
to which the state may be entitled under the provis- 
ions of this grant. All money derived from the sale 
of this land scrip, shall be deposited in the treasury of 
the state, which shall issue therefor a certificate of in- 
debtedness bearing interest perpetually at a rate cf 
not less than 5 % per annum, and the proceeds of 
said land scrip shall constitute a perpetual fund, the 
interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated by 
each state to the endowment, maintenance and sup- 
port of the State University therein, or of any other 
state seminary of learning. Our College has hither- 
to received from the government but 360,000 acres 
of land and therefore, if this bill is passed, it will re- 
ceive a large amount of land, the proeeds of which 
will be a welcome addition to the annual income. 
This bill must pass. 



POLO. 
The polo team defeated Storrs in an exciting con- 
test on the pond Saturday, Feb. 1 . The game was 
full of sharp play from start to finish and although the 
pond was a little wet owing to the rain in the morning 
this feature did not prevent the spectators from taking 



even more interest in the ups and downs of the game 
which were loudly applauded. 

Storrs played a strong team and only for the mag- 
nificent work of Marshall the score might have been 
different. The M. A. C. team was greatly weakened 
by the absence of Charmbury, '98, the former and 
the latter together, playing a beautiful pass game, call- 
ing forth storms of applause by their clever dodging 
and always winning by their unsurpassible drives. 

The game was called at 3 p. m. Moore won the 
rush, and for a few minutes play was hot. Then 
Marshall took a hand in the work and at the end of 
ten minutes had rushed the ball up the field and put 
her throngh the goal by a magnificent drive. 

In the second Reed won the rush, the opposing 
team taking the offensive, but, always dropping back 
when Marshall saw fit to rush in, causing every one to 
smile by the ease in which he took the ball away from 
their rushers. Shaw and Marshall had difficulty with 
their skates. Lincoln andj. S.Eaton went into the game. 
Storrs by magnificent team work carried the ball down 
the field and Comber by a pretty drive put the ball 
through the goal. 

At the beginning of the third the score was one all 
and it was pretty hot work until the finish ; finally 
Hooker at Half, got the ball, rushed down the field 
with Shaw and from a pretty pass from the latter, 
drove the ball square for a goal, it was a neat play and 
it was loudly applauded. Time was called soon after 
and the game was over. 

Both teams merit applause for their work. Taylor 
in goal and Comber at center were the best for the 
visitors. The work of Nutting was great and we be- 
lieve with new shin guards he would be a shining 
light. Hooker's work at half can't be beat, he stops 
drives like a veteran, and handles himself exceedingly 
well. The line-up was as follows : 

Storrs. M. A. C. 

Waite, 1st rush, Moore 

Reed, 2d rush, Shaw 

Comber, centre, Marshall 

H. B. Mansfield, half-back, Hooker 

Taylor. goal, Nutting 

, !■» i Lincoln 

Rosbebrooke, substitutes, , s Eaton 

Referee— P. A. Leamy, M. A. C, '96. Timer— A. S. 
Kinney, M, A. C, '96. Time— 3, 15-minute periods. 



n6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



INDOOR MEET. 
Results of the Athletic Meet held Feb. 8, 1896, 
were as follows : 



POTATO RACE. 

1st — Moore, 
2nd — Emrich, 
3d — Norton. 

ROPE CLIMB. 

1st — Moore, 
2nd — Warden, 
3d — Canto. 



QUARTER MILE WALK. 

1st — Cheney, 
2nd — Eaton, 
3d — Emrich. 

THREE STANDING JUMPS. 

1st — Dutcher, 
2d — Harper, 
3d — Warden. 



TWENTY-FIVE YARD DASH. STANDING HOP, STEP AND JUMP. 



1st — Emrich, 
2nd — Norton, 
3d — Moore. 

STANDING BROAD JUMP. 

1st — Emrich, 
2nd — Harper, 
3d — Dutcher. 



1st — Dutcher, 
2nd — Warden, 
3d — Harper. 

POINTS BY CLASSES. 

'96—18, 
'97—23, 
'98—10, 
'99—12. 



W. B. Harper, President. 

H. J. Armstrong, Secretary and Treasurer. 



lumm. 



Dear Classmates : One of the two circular letters 
which were sent around last fall and a summary of it 
is given below. Either the mail service in Massachu- 
setts is extremely slow or some one has the other 
letter in his coat pocket and has forgotten it. Please 
hurry it along. Fraternally, 

F. S. Hoyt, Corres. Sec'y '93. 

Baker, Jos. Grosvenor Dale, Conn. Foreman on 
a factory farm. " Grand opportunity to put into prac- 
tice a little book farming." Expects to remain there 
till spring. 

Bartlett, F. G. Hadley, Mass. With E. H. R. 
Lyman, Northampton, In charge of gardens and 
conservatory. 

Davis, H. C. 19 Highland Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 
City salesman for his brother, E. D. Davis, wholesale 
grocer. "Have been here since July I, 1893 and 
like this business and this country very much. I 
extend to all '93 men a cordial invitation to visit me." 



Goodrich, C. A. 212 West 70th St., New York. 
Graduates from College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in '96. 

Hawkes, E. A. South Hadley, Mass. With T. S. 
Foley, who runs a large fruit and dairy farm. " Next 
fall I expect to go to a school for Christian workers 
and fit myself to become a lay worker." 

Howard, E. C. Westport, Mass. Principal High 
School. " Have one assistant. Not a large place 
but very pleasant. Have charge of Science and 
Mathematics. Expect to follow teaching for the 
present." 

Hoyt, F. S. Igontz, Penn. Instructor in Physics 
and Chemistry in Cheltenham Military Academy. 
Within a short trolley ride of Phila. See Curley fre- 
quently. Expect to teach for the present. 

Smith, C. A. address North Hadley, Mass. " Have 
been expecting to follow dry goods business and so 
have been at work in the Boston Dry Goods Store of 
Los Angles, California. This is a great country, Bus- 
iness suffers under the sharp competition and the only 
openings for capitalists are real estate and manufac- 
turing. I was never better in my life. If any of the 
fellows are out this way be sure to have them call." 

Tinoco, Luiz A. Canapos, Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 
" I have been here since I came from U. S. and 
expect to remain here. The first year I did nothing 
but travel. I now have a large sugar plantation where 
I raise yearly about 5000 tons of sugar cane. Also 
have a one-third share in a sugar factory. Also sell 
wood for fuel and raise cattle and horses. Life is ter- 
rible here with no amusements of any kind. Expect 
to come to the states in 1900." 



At the University of Pennsylvania there is a balance 
of $15,000 for next season's foot ball team. 



j All men using the Yale " gym." must have a doc- 
tor's certificate stating that they are physically sound. 



Harvard has three pitchers this year : Clarkson, 
brother of the famous league pitcher ; Fitz and 
Huton. 



The Yale Whist Club has arranged for a whist con- 
test with Harvard, The match will be played in 
March, 



AGGIE LIFI 



117 



N. H. S. 

The Natural History Society was addressed on 
February 7, by Dr. Stone, who spoke on "The Rela- 
tion of Instinct to Irritability in Plants." 

After a few introductory remarks regarding the 
founding of the Society and its first work he spoke of 
the old school men who believed that plants were 
endowed with sense, that feeling was very acute, and 
even taste was not wanting in them, and gave the 
arguments these men used to support their theory. 
He also spoke of many popular works which upheld 
this line of reasoning. 

The speaker then said that modern scientific bot- 
anists had exploded this theory by showing that actions 
seemingly due to sense and instinct were caused by 
irritability of the plant tissue and were merely reflex 
actions, and that growth was mechanical and not 
instructive. He said that all actions of plants were 
due to irritability, which was the power the plant had 
of responding to external stimuli, and that protoplasm 
was the means through which this stimuli worked. 

Dr. Stone then showed by means of a chart how 
irritability was one of the fundamental properties of 
protoplasm, and showed what the effects of gravity, 
light, heat, air, electricity and many other things were 
on growing plants. 

In closing he spoke of the near relationship of the 
plant and animal kingdoms and how much plants 
resembled animals exepting they were slower in action. 

p. 



AN OLD PICTURE, 
It hangs alone upon the panelled wall, 
A faded picture in a faded frame ; 
No traces are there for the artists name, 
For each year as it stole into the hall 
Crept o'er the writing with its dusty feet, 
And time upon the pale Madonnas's face 
A veil, has thrown, through which we dimly trace 
Eyes of beep blue by sorrow made more sweet. 

Perchance in bye-gone years in Tuscany 
Where maize-fields redden to the Autumn sun 
The painter watched the slanting shadows run 
Over the city walls and learned from him, 
The mystic botticelli, how to line 
A virgin's face ablaze with ecstacy. 

— Stanley Addleshaw in U. V. Cynic. 



Columbia College has a library of 203,000 volumes, 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

a brief record of its inception and meetings. 

Tenth Annual Banquet, St. Denis Hotel, Dec. 
17th, 1895. 

Presiding, James Henry Webb, 73. 

Guests : Lieut. W. M. Dickinson, from the College, 
and Prof. H. W. Parker, D. D., and Lieut. C. A. L. 
Totten formerly of the Faculty. 

Twelve members present. 

Divine blessing invoked by Dr. Parker. 

Post prandial. President Webb referred to the 
loyalty of our graduates, to the friendships and remi- 
niscences of our college days and accounted for the 
work in after college life to the personnel of the grand 
noble men who were our instructors, Goodell, Goess- 
mann, Clark, Parker and the rest. Regretting the 
absence of President Goodell he called upon Lieut. 
Dickinson as the representative of the Faculty. 

Lieut. Dickinson said : The college was in splendid 
condition but the only fault to be found was 
the small number in the Freshman and Sophomore 
classes. Of Latin as an entrance requirement and of 
the Two Years Course, a majority of the Faculty were 
not in favor and that steps had been taken looking 
forward to their abolishment. The military depart- 
ment had been much improved during the three years 
of his tour at Amherst by the laying of a hard wood 
floor in the drill hall, by the construction of a balcony 
12 feet wide across the south end of the drill hall, by 
the erection of a gun shed, 28'x60' to the west of the 
drill hall and connected with the latter by an enclosed 
passage-way ; the college had been recently supplied 
with two 32 in. breech loading steel guns for artillery 
drill. Many questions were asked the Lieutenant 
which he freely answered ; later in the evening, the 
matter of the dissatisfaction among the students com- 
ing up. he said, that the undergraduates could hurt the 
college or help the college by bad or good behaviour 
and want of or plenty of loyalty to the institution. 

Prof. Parker said : It is a great satisfaction to me 
to meet so many of my former pupils of the M. A. C. 
In fact it has been a surprise to me every year that 
they should remember and invite me ; and yet I know 
that I cherish them in memory, and that my old 



n8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



teachers, even in the academy and common school, 
have an immortal place in my heart. 

I recall many incidents of our association together 
in Amherst. The name of that town, too, is to me 
full of past interest. You wouid scarcely believe that 
my recollections go back to the year 1827, when my 
family had a brief residence there, in my early child- 
hood. Next, I took my college course in the old 
institution, and another set of incidents are vividly 
retained in mind. A single sample occurs to me in 
thinking of class-room scenes. A classmate, who is 
now a venerable Doctor of Divinity in New Jersey, 
had succeeded in getting his finger through a knot-hole 
in the bench on which he sat, but was unable to extri- 
cate the digit. At the conclusion of the recitation, 
which was in mathematics, we gathered around him, 
and the tutor asked what was the matter. The un- 
fortunate student replied, " 1 do not know unless it be 
that the part is greater than the hole." 

Perhaps the most interesting recollection in these 
times is the long journey from Ithaca, N. Y., to Am- 
herst. We started from Ithaca at 9 p. m. in a stage- 
coach and went dragging through mire and ruts all 
night, — a very adipose fellow-passenger on my seat 
sleeping, and with every lurch of the coach his 200 or 
300 pounds thrown against me, or my lighter weight 
against him ; and all next day we dragged along, 
arriving in the evening at Utica, then the terminus of 
what is now the New York Central railroad; and, in 
the old-fashioned stage-coach boxes on platforms, we 
steamed all night to Albany. There we took stage all 
day to Pittsfield, lodged there, and coached all the 
next day to Northampton, lodging there the fourth 
night, and reaching Amherst the next forenoon. 

My third residence in Amherst as teacher in the 
Agricultural college has too many pleasant memories 
to recount, although these were saddened by the long 
and eventually fatal sickness of my wife, and, after 
that, by the crippled condition of the institution, which 
finally made it necessary to dispense with several pro- 
fessorships. But I rejoice that it is now on a firm 
foundation, with an encouraging degree of prosperity. 
And I look forward, not only to other pleasant meet- 
ings with you, my good friends, but to the far future 
after I have passed away, when graduates of the M. 
A. C. shall be numbered by hundreds within reach of 
New York, and very many shall be gathered at these 



club reunions. All blessings on them, and you, and 
the model Agricultural college. 

Lieut. Totten said : It is needless for me to reiter- 
ate the sentiments you all know I hold towards the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and while I thank 
you for the recollections of indebtedness as to re- 
wards incurred during my connection with it, as the 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics, I must pro- 
test in reply that I consider myself to owe far more to 
my detail at Amherst than all those combined who 
came under my influence there can ever show upon 
the other side. 

It was at Amherst that Strategos, the American 
war game, was conceived — a piece of work that while 
it fell almost stillborn here in America, we have the 
satisfaction of knowing won the personal recognition 
of Von Moltke, Sir Garnet Woolsey, Batlinger of 
Switzerland and other high foreign military officials. 
There too, with your President Goodell, I blocked out 
a military enclyclopedia and dictionary, not yet pub- 
lished, the very vocabulary of which can place an 
average of ten words between any two in that of simi- 
lar published works. It was at Amherst that I acquired 
the habit of hard work. 

But I chiefly owe a vast debt to my detail there in 
that it was while at the Mass. Agricultural College my 
study was first directed to Chronology and History in 
their relation to Prophecy, the which has since be- 
come my life work and is already not without reward. 
In retrospect it all seems as one of those accidents 
that are not all an accident. I was then a great 
Swedenborgen, and in view of its deeper spiritual 
sense, I was coming to care very little for the actual 
or literal truth of the Bible. In this mood, however, 
and under the friendly challenge of a fellow student , 
who was more deeply jealous of its literal truth, I 
studied Archbishop Newton on the Prophecies in 
order to review the whole case. 

But after all I came to the conclusion, and it 
seemed to include the rest, that Daniel's claims to 
pre-eminence among the Prophets was a matter of 
serious doubt in that while apparently alive to the 
greatness of Babylon, Persia, Greece and Rome, his 
philosophy had utterly failed to include that of the 
Anglo-Saxons (Great Britain and America), who are 
the gigantic exponents of an empire of far more solid 
facts in a world one hundred fold as large as any I 






AGGIE LIFE. 



119 



could then see had yet come within Daniel's per-view. 

So I again gave up the study of literality and was 
tempted to give up all study on that line. This was 
before the days of the higher criticism. Had the 
atmosphere been as dense as now, 1 presume I had 
never resumed it. As it was, when my detail expired, 
I went West into a brief campaign and at its close, 
while re-stationed in San Francisco, drifted into Ban- 
croft's large book-store. There my eye, surprised, 
fell upon a small brochure advocating the identity of 
the Anglo-Saxons with the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel, 
and pointing to them as the heirs of Daniel's Fifth 
Empire. 

The very title destroyed the grounds of my objec- 
tions to Daniel, as by an instantaneous revelation. I 
could not resist investigation, and a single reading con- 
vinced me of our Origin and Destiny. The whole 
strength of literal truth came back upon me. A real- 
ization of the wonderful lines by which these two 
nations have been led, first as the Beth Khumri, or 
House of Baal, out of Palestine and into Media, 
according to the Bible, then as the Cumbri out of 
Media and into the Crimea, according to Heroditus ; 
thence according to Sharon Turner, across the north- 
ern wilderness of Europe by all its Dans and Danubes, 
Dons and Evidones, all named as resting places in 
faint memory of the Jordan, the far-forgotten river of 
more ancient rest, and thank God the prophecy of yet 
future peace when they re-gathered there, flooded 
down upon my re-awakened heart. 

History had now a new zest for me ; the love of it 
returned. Its great possibilities awoke ; its rafson d' 
etre, its fair philosophy. But the deeper 1 progressed 
into it, upon the lines mapped out, as it were, a-fore- 
hand by the prophets of our race, the more in need I 
found myself of a reliable and inelastic strand on which, 
as beads, to string its facts so thoroughly misunder- 
stood. There was but one way to treat the tangled 
skein, the beads were numbered, so I cut it, to re-string 
anew. 

Of Chronology, however, scientifically so-called, 
there was nothing worthy on our shelves, except a 
mass of notes in orderly confusion — because no system 
thereof existed which appealed with consistency to an 
Astronomy founded on the cycles of those bodies God 
himself had originally set for the measure of the times 
and seasons, days and years. I therefore delved into 



it myself, as the necessary preliminary to the re-wnt- 
ing of a correct universal history of the past, and so, 
by multifarious circumstances, too numerous to detail, 
my whole life has become devoted to a quest that has 
already unearthed some of the grandest facts within 
the domain of historical discovery. 

I am looked upon as a crank ; my work branded by 
the press, that does not at all understand it, and I am 
glad to vindicate myself here, in the house of friends 
who do know the style of effort I am capable of mak- 
ing, and can right me somewhat in its own circles. 

The charts I have brought here to-night for your 
acceptance represent but a small part of my work since 
we dined together here a year ago. The larger one 
sets forth the entire book of Daniel, blocked to scale, 
100 years per inch, and made self-explanatory by the 
parallel arrangement of its chapters. They interpret 
each other without the need of outside comment and 
fit history as a fact. So, in a metaphorical sense, 
Daniel now stands in his lot before you at the end of 
this 1895 A. D., which is just seven times, or 2520 
years from the rise of the Empire, at whose gate he 
sat as the judge of God, such his name, and which is 
just half of that, or 1260 years from the first year of 
the Calif Omar's entrance into the holy places of our 
race. The Times of the Gentiles are at their hither 
bourne, Edom is the end of the age, but Jacob, the 
beginning of that which cometh after, for Jerusalem, 
you know, " Shall be trodden underfoot until the times 
of the Gentiles be fulfilled." We stand upon a momen- 
tous threshold. These facts, my friends, are of deep 
significance. 

But alas, this very night there comes to us the 
electric echo of Mr. Cleveland's message upon Ven- 
ezulean matters, the very tone of which threatens to 
strain the good will of these two nations, born to rule 
the world, in fraternal confederation, rather than to 
wrangle in arms over fictions not at all well understood 
by our own people, as a whole, nor even attempted to 
be proved upon our part as sufficiently aggressive upon 
that of Great Britain, if we may judge by the appended 
diplomatic correspondence, to warrant such a tone. 

War is a serious matter, not at all lightly to be 
entertained. All things are possible, but this thing 
ought to be impossible between Brother John and 
Brother Jonathan. And what manner of man is he that 
goeth into war without first counting the cost? Neither 



120 



AGGIE LIFE. 



England or America can afford to dream of such a 
contingency. The thought of it is a mere nightmare 
to be shaken off at the sober re-awakening. 

I have nothing to say as to the relative strength and 
fighting qualities of these two giants, for together I 
deem it sure that they could dominate a world in arms, 
and that for peace I believe is yet to be their destiny. 
But if they are to be thus suddenly, and 1 think inex- 
cusably arrayed against each other in exhausting con- 
flict, chaos only can be expected to preside at their 
far-off treaty of subsequent peace, and while the world's 
progress would be set back an hundred years, one 
might almost be justified in fearing, in spite of a belief 
in prophecy, that their own could hardly be recovered. 

And what in the meantime would become of such 
questions as the Armenian atrocities and other ques- 
tions of the East and farther East, which look chiefly 
to united Anglo-Saxon intervention for their true solu- 
tion. This college is a military one, and one of noble 
record, and as its old instructor in the arts and sciences 
of my own resigned, but still well-loved profession, I 
know its sons are strong and equal to their part in all 
their country's needs, but may the God of battles avert 
the day when their services are needed in such a cause 
as this. 

There are two sides to every question, and as yet 
we do not know the actual facts on either side of this 
controversy. Surely it is too soon for taking sides 
upon matters which may yet turn out to be none of 
our business. 

In a recent publication we alluded to the lines as 
shown upon Black's Atlas (1854) as prima facie 
evidence against Great Britain's claim, but surely we 
should allow the possibility of full evidence in rebuttal, 
and weigh it in an unbiased attitude, nor prejudice our 
chance of obtaining it by over-hasty and excited acts. 
For war towards which in misunderstanding we now 
so seriously tend, is an evil greatly magnified when put 
in process, as between two nations so closely bound 
together as are we. And if blood and treasure must 
be wasted, at so great expense as such an one would 
necessitate, I for one would far rather see the whole 
of South America joined to the lost Atlantis than have 
war declared, by any overt and unjustifiable acts of ours. 
Such a war would wipe all Anglo-Saxon commerce 
from the seas, close against us our best and perhaps 
only open foreign market, plunge us into a multiplied 



debt, place us under a greatly magnified pension bur- 
den and re-awaken animosity, which was well upon the 
wane in Anglo-Saxon quarters. Finally, it is incom- 
patible with the grand fact of our origin and destiny, 
for England and America to come to blov/s. We 
have far greater and far grander things to do, and 
both nations should recede from their too rigid attitude, 
so as to approach each other upon some honorable 
middle ground." 

In comment on Lieut. Totten's speech, Dr. Parker 
said, "I beg permission to express my gratification in 
view of the line of study pursued by the able lieuten- 
ant. I do not count myself an adept in scripture 
prophecies, but I am thoroughly satisfied that, whatever 
difference there may be in the details of interpreta- 
tion, the scriptures do contain a foreshadowing of the 
great features of history for all time. And Lieut. 
Totten's work is of a kind to show that the Bible 
history and literature are something more than a 
merely natural evolution and natural product. That 
is what the rationalistic and so-called scientific critics 
are driving at — to eliminate the supernatural entirely. 
Against this I have written in another line of effort a 
book, now in press, entitled " The Agnostic Gospel," 
— in part to show that Huxley in his Biblical writings 
is a sham. I trust there is enough Christianity in the 
Agricultural college to array its students on the side 
of the venerable Bible, which has lived till now and 
will abide forever. (Applause.) 

(To be continued in our next.) 



SONNET. 
I wandered by a rippling, babbling brook, 
And listened to its murmurs as it flowed 
With silvery cadence at my feet. It showed 
To me, when I had wandered far, a nook 
Delightfully secreted from the look 
Of human form, where I might cast my load 
Of woes aside, and breathe the scent of new-mown 
Meadows, gently wafted o'er the brook. 

Oh, crystal streamlet, 'tis to thee I owe 

My gratitude for this. I now would peer 

Into thy face and know if thou'rt a seer. 

Tell me, before you swiftly onward flew, 

If I may hope a brighter day than now. 

It whispered, "Onward! Stand not idly here." 

M. W. in College Life. 



At Syracuse only 15 hours work are required every 
week. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



121 



,%f\\&n£ei 



All the leading colleges now give credit for work on 
college papers. 

Yale will employ no professional coach for the ball 
team this year. 

There are about 80,000 members of college Greek- 
letter fraternities. 

The receipts of the college paper in Stanford are 
yearly fifty per cent, more than cost. 

Harvard makes the study of English the only re- 
quired work in the whole curriculum. 

INCENTIVE. 
Know, my love, that ever since thy love 

First thrilled my heart, and made life all a dream, 

Full rich fancies, all that once did seem 
So hopeless, distant, and so far above 
My meagre strength, no matter how 1 strove, 

Now challenges to show myself supreme ; 

And through my heart ambition pours a stream 
Of life and courage, my great love to prove. 

Ah I Darling, know, in all the scenes 1 paint 
Of future bliss and happiness and rest, 
How cold they are until I quickly trace 
The central figure, by which all seem faint, — 
This part 1 finish with, — I paint it best, — 

'Tis you, my dear, so full of love and grace I 

— T. in The Cynic. 

COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL.. 



CHARLES G. AYRES, 
IvIVKKY STABILE). 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

J 8®=At Reasonable Prices. Jg& 



w. w. : 

MANUFACTURER OI 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale- Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 
Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware. Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, A. M., 2.34 p. M., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09. 8.20 A. M., 2.34 p. M. Sunday at 

6.10 A. M. 

Returning leave Worcester at 1 1. 15 A. M., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 a. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. M. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55. 8.05, 8.50 A. M., 
12.30, 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m.. 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., goinS 
south leave Amherst at 8.01. 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 11.46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
11-30 A. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. M. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



122 



AGGIE LIFE. 



iLJ 



and others* 

There are no untried 
devices in 1896 Col- 
umbias. Every detail 
has been perfected by 
at least a year's use. 

Beautiful Art Catalogue for 
5896 of Columbia and Hart- 
ford Bicycles is free if you 
call upon any Columbia 
agent ; by mail from us for 
two 2-cent stamps. 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Factories and General Offices, Hartford, Conn. 

Branch Stores and Agencies in almost every city and 

town. If Columbias are not properly represented 

in your vicinity let us know. 




Special Attention Given to Finishing Spreads. 



• PRINT 

AMHERST, 



r<?nm 



MASS. 



^eS'%^5 



^mM&m 



^■•&h ^) 



The Photographer from Boston 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 

146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



JjJjl 



J 



J 



D AND FOOL FjR 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



John 

13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Livery, peed and Boarding Stable 



Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Street, - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. «". BROWN", D. D. S. 



OE 

Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ethei - and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 



STEAM AMD GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



SHEET 

AND 



STRINGS FOR VIOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAR. 



AT 



Cusfynari's Ausic $fore, 



N OR TIL A. MF T ON. 



*"? W^ S tf% & s 



T 1 O 1 



Business Suits, |II9. 
Custom Pants, $4.5© 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



SCBS££&RB'S 

GRAPHIC STUDIO. 



Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. ,J, @CHIL,L,ARE, 

10S Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

GOAL. A MO WOOD. 

THOMAS C. BILLON, 

dealer in 

ID AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLl- FIELD'S 



♦BILLIARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1S50. 



GO TO- 



1895. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STU 

FOE THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Glass and Group IQopk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
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Buy the Latest Farm Machinery and lake Money. 

Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found In the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



110 page catalogue showing a large collection of Farm- 
ing Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full direc- 
tions for using and planting the same, free on application. 



162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



fflassaehusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FAB.] 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percheron Horses and Soutiii Sleep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amiierst, Mass. 

MASS, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TKUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $3.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

2 



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AMHERST, MASS. 



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,riAI¥il 



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OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ZKTXIBIBIEi^ G-OCODS- 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



j&SrHejKiiriitg done while you wait.^S 
3 FHCEX1X ROW. 

DICKINSON I GUERTIN, 



BOARDIHG 



LiYer f, Feed and Exchange Stable 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Jtfass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 



! 



ir 



WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 



RAZORS HOWED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

H:E>WRY ADAMS, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday anil night call-- responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

m{Um Qt eam Laundry* 

and Carpel Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, O. E*. PAL,MEH 'O™. 
Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

r&oATISPACTION QTJAEANTEED. H& 

Office : 

Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & C(X 

Barge !o and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO OEDER. 

§@=»SPECIAL RATES..,©? 

Passenger to center, 10c. 

Passenger to Aggie, - 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - ' - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ...... 25c 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



prl fluff of iif 



Mollfe Tailors, patters, Finis 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACKSOCT & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



B. 1ST. BLQSBETT & CQ., 

Merchant Tailors 



■ AND DEALERS IN • 



R< 



DY-MADE CLOTHING. 



We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^"■Repairing neatly done at short notice, .^ggg 



O-so. W. Blodgett & Co. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



'^OTJ'BYT'A.TSZ PEN®. 
Sevmour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



^Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, to. 4- 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE OOKIi^O'MOl'iffESJSfcY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 26, 1896. 



NO. 11 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96. Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96, As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS, '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT. '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING, '97. Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY, '97, Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN. '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



We would again remind the members of the lower 
classes that competition for positions on the Life edi- 
iorial board closes on March 5th. All contributions 
must be handed to the editor-in-chief on, or before 
that date. 



So much space has been devoted to publishing the 
matter connected with the New York Alumni Club 
that the editors have been obliged to exclude other 
material which we would be very glad to print. The 
last of this matter is now printed and we hope in fu- 
ture to be able to print articles of more general inter- 
est to the student body. 



Those who attended the meeting of the N. H. S. 
on Friday evening were treated to a remarkably inter- 
esting lecture by Lieut. Dickinson. His subject was 



one of historic interest, but not strictly in keeping with 
the aims of the society, which are understood to be 
scientific. The Lieutenant never does things by the 
halves, and his efforts before the recent meeting of 
the society were appreciated by a large and enthusias- 
tic audience. 



The Military Ball is over and everybody is satisfied 
that this annual affair is a fixed event in our College 
life. In a College like ours, where the classes are so 
small, it is impossible for the junior class to bear the 
expense of a promenade and this seems to be the only 
way in which we can break in on the dull round of 
daily toil which becomes so monotonous during the 
winter term. What more pleasant interruption can 
be had than an affair of this kind? The Military Ball 
has come to stay in the M. A. C. 



We very much regret that space will not allow us 
to print abstracts from the theses which have been 
prepared by the senior class in Poiitical Economy. 
There are many of these papers which are worthy of 
a better fate than that which they receive. It would 
seem more fitting to have the better ones printed and 
a limited number distributed among the student body. 
Every member of the division should have one copy 
of each. They show special study and care in prepa- 
ration and would be valuable for future reference. We 
wish the College could arrange in some way to pro- 
vide every member of the class with a copy of each 
individual thesis. 



The chemical divisions ot the senior class took 
Wednesday, last, to visit the places of interest, from 
the standpoint of industrial chemistry, in Holyoke, 
Springfield and Easthampton. We are obliged on ac- 
count of lack of 'space, to forego the pleasure of 
printing a full account of trips, as written up by one 
of the party. Professor Wellington, who secured this 



124 



AGGIE LIFE. 



privilege for the division, spared no pains to make the 
day a profitable and enjoyable one and his efforts met 
with unlimited success. One has hardly a concep- 
tion of the knowledge thus acquired until he sits down 
to think of the many new and novel methods which he 
has studied. Where the machinery of production is at 
its height and where human hands are skilled by years 
of application the gulf which separates the theoretical 
from the practical seems more apparent. 



The captain of the base ball team will put the can- 
didates for positions on the team in training at once 
and the mar.ager is now, and has for some time back, 
been arranging games with other colleges, many of 
them to be played on the campus. Let every student 
go to work and do all in his power to make the team 
a success. We are disgusted with the failure of our 
athletic teams in the past, but we can hope to realize 
nothing but defeat until we put more heart and will 
and brains into our work. Turn out with a determi- 
nation to get on the team and to deserve to stay there 
and to do credit to the College. Don't stay away 
from practice because you can't make the team, or 
because the captain and manager "won't give you a 
show." The captain and manager are both gentlemen 
capable of filling creditably the positions they hold, 
and will treat you justly and honorably if you but do 
justice to yourself. Gentlemen, if you would win 
games you must practice. Go to work with a will. 



CONDITIONED. 
Dear old pipe, my oldest friend, 

Brier of darkest hue, 
How I long to smoke and dream — 

I'm in love with you. 

Good old beer, an oft-tried friend, 

Best and choicest brew, 
How I long for you again — 

I'm in love with you. 

Laughing lips and rosy cheeks, 

Eyes of deepest blue, 
You I long for most of all — 

I'm in love with you. 

Tempt me not, my dear old friends, 

I have work to do — 
Four condftions in a term — 

For I loved but you. 



^"orvtf ibu-ted. 



-Brunonian. 



OBJECTIONS TO WOMAN SUFFRAGE. 

Much has been written of late concerning the sub- 
ject of woman suffrage. Every paper, every maga- 
zine we take up has a " woman's column," devoted 
largely to the discussion of women's rights. One 
might well infer from these articles that the women 
of to-day are little better than slaves, and that all 
their rights and privileges are denied them. Such, 
we know, is not the case. The laws that protect the 
property of men afford equal protection to the property 
of women. The laws that impose taxes upon the 
property of men impose taxes similar, and no greater, 
upon the property of women. The laws that admin- 
ister justice to men mete out equal justice to women. 
Never before in the history of the world have women 
been regarded with greater respect, or their rights 
more carefully considered than they are to-day. 

When, gathered in the cabin of the Mayflower, the 
Pilgrim Fathers signed the compact that bound them 
all to do that which was best for the common good, 
there was no mention made of woman's rights. 
When, during the dreary winter of 1620 and '21, 
disease and famine had reduced the little band to less 
than half its original number, the women of Plymouth 
made no demand for woman's rights. Their place 
was by the side of their husbands and brothers, to en- 
courage and to cheer ; and bravely did they fulfil their 
mission. And in the spring, when the vessel that was 
the one link that bound them to the mother country' 
to friends, to home, sailed away, " Strong hearts and 
true 1 not one went bac k in the Mayflower ! " During 
the dark days of the Revoution, when our nation was 
making its great struggle for an existence of its own, 
when the English King called patriots " traitors," and 
set a price upon their heads, the American women 
bore their share of the dangers and privation with 
a willingness and a fortitude that were heroic. 
Later, when our land was torn by civil discord, and 
men took up arms against their brethren, the women 
of the nation rallied to the support of their dear ones. 
On the field, in the camp, in the prison, in the hospi- 
tal, their tender care was extended alike to friend and 
foe. 

Such are not the women who clamor for woman 



AGGIE LIFE. 



125 



suffrage! The movement is one of recent origin, and 
it may be traced back to two great classes of women. 
The first is composed of those maiden ladies who, 
having spent half their lives in fruitless attempts to 
procure a husband devote the remainder of their days 
to denouncing the men sex. The second is the great 
body of married women who are supported in ease 
and comfort by their husbands, and take up the ques- 
tion of woman suffrage either as a " fad " or from an 
inordinate desire to achieve the unattained. These 
two classes of women meet in the woman's club, 
where the various phases of the subject are discussed 
in a more or less irrational manner. 

Let us see what are the more important claims ad- 
vanced by the suffragists, and how much truth they 
contain. One of the commonest of their statements 
is that wherever woman suffrage has been tried in 
this country it has invariably met with success. Facts, 
however, fail to substantiate this claim. In Utah it 
has been the cause of serious disturbances ; in New 
Jersey its failure has been disastrous ; and in Wyo- 
ming, the very apple of the suffragist's eye, we have 
it on authority of Judge Cary that " Usually only 
about half of the women go to the polls." 

We are told also that women are better than men, 
and therefore would make better laws and would puri- 
fy politics. While the fact that two-thirds of the im- 
prisoned criminals in the United States are men can- 
not be disputed, it does not prove that men are worse 
than women, or what is the same thing, that women 
are better than men. We must remember that the 
majority of women in this country are shielded and 
protected, while a great percentage of the men lead 
adventurous lives away from home, exposed to count- 
less dangers and temptations. In this same connection 
we are often told that women would vote against war, 
and that as a consequence all nations would be at 
peace. Will history support this statement ? No ! 
Many of the wars of the old world have been caused 
by the intriguing of women ; and in our own country 
women have ever been foremost in urging their hus- 
bands, brothers, and sweethearts to take up arms in 
time of war. 

It is strongly urged that extending suffrage to 
women will reform morals, close the saloons, and 
other places of evil resort, and bring about prudence 
and honesty in the management of municipal and 



national affairs. The chief of the several objections 
to this statement is that laws that do not represent the 
majority of male votes can never be enforced. While 
law-abiding citizens are a law unto themselves, law- 
breakers must be controlled by force. Man will sub- 
mit to persuasion from woman, but to force, never. 
Both of the two great political parties would pass laws 
to please the female voters ; laws that either must 
become a " dead letter," or require a despotic govern- 
ment to enforce them. 

Thus we see the fallacy, the weakness of some of 
the fundamental doctrines of the woman suffragists. 
But there are other objections to woman suffrage 
that must force themselves upon the mind of every 
thoughtful person. Among them the following seem 
to stand out as danger signals warning men of the 
disaster beyond. The moment women become poli- 
ticians, chivalry with all its refining influences, will 
disappear. That admiration and respect for woman- 
kind which are now most potent factors in our civili- 
zation would be forever lost. 

So intense is religious feeling among women that 
religious feuds would affect politics to a much greater 
extent than at the present time. The dogmas of 
preacher and of priest would become more and more 
powerful at a place where they have no right to 
intrude themselves, namely, the polls. 

The introduction of women into political life would 
be sure to increase its bitterness.. It is a well-known 
fact that women are more excitable than men, and 
are prone to commit rash deeds when so agitated. 
Let those who doubt this recall the wrangle among 
the members of the National Board of Lady Mana- 
gers of the World's Fair. This board was an assem- 
blage of the leading women of the United States, yet 
many of their meetings terminated in slanderous 
attacks upon each other, hysterics, and tears. Or 
witness the recent dissension in the ranks o f the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and then say 
whether or not women are capable of bitterness. 

Furthermore, woman suffrage would impose a ter- 
rible strain on family relations. Already marriages 
are proportionally diminishing and divorces increasing. 
To introduce politics into home life would be a fresh 
cause for infidelity and divorce. Wives would often 
be voting against the best business of their own hus- 
bands, and in support of laws or persons particularly 



126 



AGGIE LIFE. 



obnoxious to them. To-day women may say what 
they will and be listened to with deference. The 
moment a woman becomes a politician her power in 
speech will have vanquished, and her remarks be 
ignored. 

There are two other great reasons why women 
should keep out of political life. The first is a physio- 
logical one. While there are exceptions, as seen in 
brilliant women scholars and women sometimes suc- 
cessful in business, the fact remains that the larger 
proportion of the best women could never be able to 
meet the demands of voting and of office holding at 
set times. The whole medical faculty are agreed 
upon this point. The second great reason is that it 
would lower the moial tone of women who would be- 
come political leaders, and have a similar unfavorable 
influence upon all women active in politics. We 
know that women are not above ambition, nor are 
they free from prejudice and favoritism. Power and 
wealth would sooner or later attract them, and while 
some might resist, to bring such influences to bear 
upon all must be injurious to moral principles. 
Women of refinement would be forced to mingle in 
political life with a class of women from whose com- 
pany they are now fortunately removed. Such a 
mingling would be detrimental to the class of women 
first mentioned, Havelock Ellis, the eminent English 
criminologist says, — " In England, which has taken 
the lead in enlarging the sphere of woman's work, the 
level of female criminality has for half a century been 
rising." 

We have thus seen the serious objections to woman 
suffrage, and may now enquire what the true solution 
of the question of women's rights ought really to be. 
In reply to a distinguished woman advocate of this 
suffrage movement who said, " We need the ballot to 
protect us against the men," Bishop John H. Vincent 
the founder of the great Chautauqua movement writes 
follows : " When one sex is compelled thus to protect 
itself against the other the foundations of society are 
already crumbling. Woman now makes man what 
he is. She controls him as babe, boy, manly son, 
brother, lover, husband, and father. Her influence is 
enormous. If she uses it wisely, she needs no addi- 
tional power. If she abuses her opportunity, she de- 
serves no additional responsibility. Woman can, 
through the votes of men, have every right to which 



she is entitled. All she has man has gladly given her. 
It is his glory to represent her. To rob him of this 
right is to weaken both." c. d. l. 



THE APPLE WOMAN. 
(A Memory.) 
Her cap was white and frilled with care, 
Her mien the quite unconscious air 
Of one who knew each passer-by 
Without the raising of an eye. 

Before her on a legged tray, 

Fresh apples ripe and ruddy lay. 

Her knitting with deft hands she plied ; 

But woe to any youth she spied. 

Who, thinking that her eyes in use. 

He'd try the urchin's ancient ruse — 

" How much be apples, ma'am, this morn ? ' 

While one big fruit with air forlorn 

Would find its way into his fist, 

Then coyly travel down his wrist 

Into a tattered sleeve. 

Her sunshade of an ancient make, 

She'd wildly at this urchin shake — 

"You thavin ' lad be off wid ye ! 

Dcn't thry your poor, mane thricks on me." 

And down this weapon on his head 

She'd bring as though his pate were lead. 

But this was Peggy's way. 

Then oft again her keen gray eye 
Would mark a boy in passing by, 
And noting quick his hungry look 
She'd with her sunshade's ample hook 
Just drag him back before her stand, 
And with her aged brawny hand 
His pocket fill from out her store. 
These kindly deeds she does no more ; 
For in her place a dusky youth 
Sells nuts and foreign candied fruit 
To children of the very men 
Who years ago would now and then 
An apple buy at Peggy's stand, 
To hear her tones so rich and bland — 
" Foine day, God bless ye boy! " 



COLLEGE VERSE. 
Did you ever notice this : 
When a fellow steals a kiss 
From a righteous little maiden calm and meek, 
How her scriptural training shows 
In not turning up her nose, 
But in simply turning round the other cheek? 

— Cornell Widow. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



127 



^ 



— The D. G. K. Fraternity was photographed by 
Lovell, Feb. 8th. 

— Baseball practice has commenced in the Drill 
Hall under the direction of Capt. Marshall. 

— The baseball management has thus far made 
arrangements for six games the coming season. 

— H. T. Edwards, '96, and J. A. Emrich, '97, have 
been declared winners in the Whist Tournament. 

— N. Wallace of Ludlow, Mass., has succeeded 
Mr. Thompson as the College electrical engineer. 

— D. C. Potter, '95, has returned to College for a 
few weeks to pursue a special course in physiological 
Botany under Dr. Stone. 

— Mrs. Oliver Cowles. formerly matron at the 
boarding house, died suddenly at her home in South 
Deerfield, February 20th. 

— Dr. Goessmann addressed a farmers' institute of 
the Plymouth County Agricultural Society held at 
Middleboro, Friday, Feb. 14th. 

— In Zoology. Prof. Lull : "How do vertebrates 
move about?" Precocious Youth: "By curvatures 
of the spine assisted by the caudal fin." 

— A. Glynn, the College tailor has kindly offered 
one of his $20. uniforms as a second prize in the 
competitive drill for the medal offered by I. C. Green, 
'94. 

— Lieut. W. M. Dickinson delivered a very pleas- 
ing lecture before the Natural History society on Fri- 
day evening, Feb. 21st, his subject being, "Decisive 
Battles of the World." 

— Several departments of the College will be rep- 
resented in the coming advertising carnival of Am- 
herst merchants. The band will furnish inspiring 
music for the occasion. 

— F. H. Read, '96, attended as delegate from the 
local chapter, a banquet of the Beta Chapter of the 
Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity of Union College, held 
at Albany, N. Y., Feb. 20th. 

— Prof. S. T. Maynard will discuss "The Propaga- 
tion and Pruning of Fruit Trees" at a meeting of the 
Mass. Fruit Growers' Association, to be held. %X 
Worcester, Mar. 12th and 13th. 



— Dr. Stone lectured Jan. 30th before the horticul- 
tural society at Worcester, on "Plant Diseases" as 
related to the horticulturist. Again, at All Saints 
Church, Worcester, Feb. 21st on "Botany." 

— On Wednesday, Feb. 19th, the senior chemical 
division took a very pleasant and profitable trip to 
Springfield and Holyoke with Dr. Wellington, and 
visited many points of interest to the chemist. 

— The faculty propose to restrict the activity of de- 
linquent students, not only in athletics, but also in any 
other College enterprise which would draw on time 
that should be employed in making up back work. 

— Dr. C. S. Walker will debate with M. A. Morse 
of Belchertown at the Hampshire Pomona Grange 
meeting in Amherst, March. 5th, on the subject cf 
"The Monroe Doctrine ; Its Origin, Use and Impor- 
tance." 

— The petition for the electric railway charter has 
passed both houses of the Legislature, and only awaits 
the governor's signature, Steps for contracting the 
construction of the road will be taken as soon as 
possible. 

— Members of the senior class have been asked to 
designate the department in which they wish to write 
their graduating thesis. Several have not as yet made 
such choice, but we hope to announce the complete 
list in the next issue. 

— The senior class cup committee has drawn up a 
series of resolutions respecting that much coveted 
souvenir. We understand that certain members of 
the class are sitting on the anxious seat till these res- 
olutions are announced. 

— Owing to sickness on the team and the poor 
condition of the ice which have rendered practice im- 
possible, the Storr's polo game on Saturday was can- 
celed. It is hoped to arrange a game with them on 
next Saturday however. 

— The Dairy School was opened to the students 
Feb. 13, and under the able management of Profes- 
sor Michels has proved to be a very valuable addi- 
tion to the College equipment. Work thus far has 
been the testing of separators for creaming, ripening 
of cream, churning, butter making, and the use of the 
Babcock tester for determining the percentage of but- 
ter fat in whole milk and its products, 



128 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Prof. Brooks has recently delivered the following 
lectures : At Salem, Feb. 7th on "Cattle Feeding;" 
at Petersham, Feb. 14th, on "How to keep up the 
fertility of the soil ;" at Cummington, Feb. 15th, on 
"Japan : Its Farms and Farmers." 

— The Y. M. C. A. has elected the following offi- 
cers for the year beginning at the opening of the 
summer term : Pres't, L. F. Clark, '97 ; vice-pres't, 
H.J. Armstrong, '97 ; corresponding secretary, W. S. 
Fisher, '93 ; recording secretary, W. E. Chapin, '99 ; 
treas., M. H. Pingree, '99. 

— Those who listened to Dr. Willets two weeks ago 
could not but have caught a little of that sunshine 
which finds its expression in a cheerful and loving dis- 
position. To-night Prof. Henry L. Southwick of Bos- 
ton will lecture on, "Hamlet, the Man of Will," which 
should prove equally interesting. 

— It is time for the seniors to keep a sharp outlook 
for positions after graduation. One cannot afford to 
allow one's faculties to rust a year or so waiting for a 
good job to come along. Begin on some work, no 
matter how distasteful it may be at first, and stick to 
it till something more congenial is offered. 

— There exists an erroneous impression among 
outsiders that, in spite of the precautions taken to se- 
cure healthy stock, symptons of tuberculosis have been 
discovered in the College herd. Retesting with tu- 
berculin of the entire stock has but recently been 
completed, and every animal is pronounced perfectly 
sound. 

— Rev. L. L. Langstrath, who is looked upon as the 
father of modern bee culture, recently died, leaving a 
very valuable library of ninety volumes on this inter- 
esting subject. This library is now offered for sale 
and one of our alumni has suggested that a few grad- 
uates contribute enough to purchase the collection and 
donate it to the College library. We should be pleased 
to see the suggestion acted upon. 

— The cap and gown question is being agitated 
among the members of the senior class. If the intro- 
duction of this form of dress would make us more 
conscious of the duties and responsibilities resting on 
the college man, or add anything to the dignity and 
seriousness of college life, then by all means it would 
be a desirable innovation. There is room for severe 
criticism of the student body in this respect, 



— The Political Economy class has recently lis- 
tened to the following theses by members of the di- 
vision : "Strikes," by B. K. Jones; "The New York 
New Haven and Hartford Railway System," by F. H. 
Read; "Modern Socialism," S. W. Fletcher ; "History 
of Co-operation in England" by H. H. Roper ; "The 
Tariff" by M. E. Sellew; "The National Debt," by 
N. Shultis ; "Abandoned Farms" by J. L. Shepard ; 
"The Economic Effects of Labor Saving Machinery" 
by G. Tsuda, 

— On Friday, Feb. 21st, the senior debate was on 
the question "Would the subversion of the Turkish 
Empire be an advantage to its subjects and to Europe 
as a whole?" Debaters, Clapp and Cook on the 
affirmative, DeLuce and Edwards on the negative. 
The merits of the debate were decided in the nega- 
tive ; the merits of the question in the affirmative. 
The next debate will be on the question "Should Bi- 
metalism be adopted by the United States indepen- 
dently of other nations?" 

— The Franklin County Harvest club at a meeting 
in South Deerfield, Feb. 15th passed the following 
resolutions, "Resolved; that the Franklin Co. Har- 
vest club hereby affirms its faith in the Mass. Agri- 
cultural College because of the successful results of 
its work, and this club recommends that the farmers 
of the state send their sons to the College in order to 
promote liberal and practical education in the several 
pursuits and professions of life." We heartily concur 
in every word of the resolution, and feel confident 
that the advice contained therein will meet with a 
ready application among the old Bay State's agricul- 
tural classes. 

— The second annual Military Ball was certainly as 
creditable and enjoyable as its predecessor. The 
floor was slippery, the decorations tasteful, the music 
excellent, and, above all, the ladies charming ; what 
more could one wish. And then the "Faculty Dance." 
As we see our stern old professors go prancing down 
the hall to the tune of Yankee Doodle, with variations, 
we are reminded of the old saying that "appearances 
are deceitful." Beneath the solemn and judicial ex- 
terior man may lurk the warm heart and ready sym- 
pathy of a rich nature. Altogether, the fraternity ball 
is to be remembered as a most pleasing interruption 
in the round of College duties. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



129 



— The following petition to the General Court has 
recently been presented by Thomas F. Keenan of 
Beston, "The city of Boston shall annually provide 
twenty-five free scholarships for young men, residents 
of said city, who may desire to pursue studies at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. The amount of 
each scholarship shall be three hundred dollars annu- 
ally. The person appointed to a scholarship shall be 
entitled to a renewal of the same each year until he 
has completed the regular four yours' course, and the 
number of scholarships shall for that purpose be in- 
creased from year to year until the whole number 
outstanding is one hundred." 

— Special training is being given to a number of 
cadets from whom the Boston squad will be selected. 
From time to time, men who prove themselves 
worthy will be added to the number. As far as cor- 
rect execution goes, we need have no fear but that 
the College will be ably represented. More will depend 
on the ability to keep a cool head while under fire 
than on any other factor. One may be perfectly 
familiar with the most minute details of the drill, but, 
becoming flustered, a mistake is sure to follow, and 
that ends it. The competitive drill for the medal of- 
fered by I. C. Green, '94, will afford an excellent~op- 
portunity for testing the qualifications of the cadets in 
this line. 

— The Secretary of Agriculture has asked Con- 
gress to appoint a director-in-chief over the con- 
stantly increasing scientific work of the department. 
$1,700,000 out of the entire appropriation are annually 
used in this scientific and technical work, and two 
thousand employees are engaged in carrying it on. It 
would seem the part of wisdom to place over it per- 
manently, a broadly educated and experienced scientific 
superintendent. Pres't Goodell, as chairman of the 
executive committee of the Association of American 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, has 
taken an active interest in the futherance of this pro- 
posal and will use his influence to secure such an 
arrangement. 

— At a mass meeting of the citizens of Amherst 
held Thursday evening, Feb. 13, for the purpose of. 
discussing the Armenian situation, Pres't Goodell pre- 
sided at and addressed the meeting. In a few eloquent 
and forcible words, all the more effective because of 



his own personal experience, he outlined the main 
features of the Armenian atrocities, closing with an 
appeal to the sympathy and generosity of Amherst 
citizens for this afflicted people. That his words were 
not without effect, the daily increasing Armenian fund 
testifies. On the following Tuesday, a collection was 
taken at chapel to aid in the good work. Among the 
distinctly national traits which characterize the Amer- 
ican people, we know of none more praiseworthy than 
this open-hearted sympathy for suffering and misery. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

(Continued.) 

Dr. John A. Cutter wished to call attention to the 
many studies carried by Prof. Parker and Lieut. 
Totten in their day of teaching, and quoted from the 
Goodell-Tuckerman catalogue : he offered the follow- 
ing resolution : " The Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Club of New York does hereby thank President 
H. H. Goodell, LL. D., and Frederick Tuckerman, M. D., 
Ph. D., '78, for the invaluable services rendered the 
college by issuing in 1886 ' The General Catalogue 
of the M. A. C,' and it respectfully requests the trustees 
of the College to earnestly consider the advisability of 
issuing a new edition of such catalogue, brought down to 
date as to college affairs and former students." Motion 
seconded ; Dr. Cutter said that it was an exceedingly 
strange thing to him why the college was not appre- 
ciated by the farmers ; that it was appreciated, when 
known by scientific men, who sent their sons there for 
hard work. The college is a means ; the work of its 
alumni, the end ; the best advertisement of the insti- 
tution was in the publishing the record of its graduates 
and former students ; ten years have elapsed since 
this catalogue was issued, and it should be again put 
out. Resolution unanimously adopted. 

Mr. Chas. E. Beach, '82, said: I am a farmer and 
I am ashamed that the college is not better appreciated. 
Perhaps the institution is too good ; President Stock- 
bridge used to say that it should be considered an 
agricultural university and draw its backing from the 
whole country. We farmers are slow ; I think we 
will come out all right, giving us time ; but the college 
should be better known. 

Mr. Herbert Myrick, '82, opened his remarks with 
an eloquent tribute to the ability and enthusiasm of the 



130 



AGGIE LIFE. 



late President Clark as a teacher and manager. He 
related how the marvelous development of Japan has 
been in a liberal measure ascribed to the intelligence 
of President Clark, who established the Imperial Agri- 
cultural College at Sapporo. Mr Myrick believed that 
M. A. C. should conduct a genuine revival among the 
farmers and people. The college is in the position of 
the average farmer who has his plant, but is com- 
pelled to sell his products at the short price while pay- 
ing the long price for all that he has to buy. By co- 
operation and the application of business principles, 
farmers must reverse this condition of affairs. They 
must buy together and sell together. They must real- 
ize that while almost anyone can produce crops, the 
vital problem is to market them to the best advantage. 
Just so with the college. It has a fine equipment, but 
in these days it must go out and hustle for students. 
It must advertise. There are original and effective 
ways of doing this. The resolution of Dr. Cutter's 
means good advertising. Newspaper advertising is 
good so far as it goes, but an organized campaign is 
needed to inform every farmers' club, grange and even 
gatherings of people in villages and cities of the great 
advantages offered by M. A. C. Juniors or Seniors 
could have no better experience than to be sent as del- 
igates to cover such meetings. The Aggie quartette, 
also other attractive features, should be used in this 
work. It should be in charge of a man of enthusiasm. 
In these days, it will not do to pursue a waiting policy. 
We must hustle if we expect to get business. 
M. A. C. must hustle if it would have students. 

Vice-President Goodrich, '93, spoke very earnestly 
of his interest in the college and of its value to him 
as a preparation for his medical studies. 

Mr. W. A. Eaton, '86, said that he had sent several 
men to the college who had entered the full four years 
course. He spoke further on the short course ; some 
general debate followed but it was considered not wise 
to send any resolution on the subject to the trustees ; 
as one said, " President Goodell and the trustees 
understand themselves and the situation." 

The chair then stated that his attention had been 
called to the fact that the theme for discussion was, 
"Does the Farmer need Trades-Unionism?" He 
would introduce a distinguished member and patriot 
from the state of New Jersey, Col. Asa Williams 



Dickinson : — 

Col. Dickinson said in part : The union of the 
United States of America was established by farmers ; 
the shot that, fired at Lexington, sounded round the 
world, was exploded by a farmer. A farmer, to join 
any union than the United states, made himself a 
traitor to his country. The farmer must not be placed 
on the level of the mechanic who lives in dread of the 
walking delegate. The same intelligence, skill, hard 
work and study that made men successful in the pul- 
pit, the courts, the practice of medicine, engineering 
and other professions, was needed in agriculture. 
Farming is the best of all the professions ; all drift 
back to it ; I am a farmer, and a better farmer than 
my townsmen, because I have the best lawn in town. 

The farmer needs a knowledge of medicine, veter- 
inary science, economics, chemistry, geology, zoology, 
climatology, mechanics, to name no more ; he is, or 
or should be, the most broadly educated man ; he feeds 
the people. 

Dr. Cutter offered the following resolution : " The 
Faculty is respectfully requested to arrange, if it deems 
wise, for a few lectures before the students this winter, 
by prominent alumni and former students ; the lectures to 
be personal to the students and not free to the public. ' ' 
The object of the resolution was to bring the students 
into close touch with the alumni, who could talk plainly 
to them of the work of the college, and the duty of the 
students to the college. Resolution adopted. 

Mr. Frank G. Urner, 77, said: A stranger, com- 
ing in upon us at our annual dinner, upon being told 
that we were old-time students in the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, would perhaps be surprised that 
so few of us were agriculturists. He would find here 
a number of lawyers, several doctors, others engaged 
in general business, and but few actual farmers, But 
it is well to note that the value of a scientific educa- 
tion, upon the lines laid down in our Alma Mater, is 
not confined to those whose occupaton in life is in the 
direct line of agriculture. The chief value of mental 
training in youth is to acquire the ability to absorb and 
retain knowledge. The purely classical education 
depends largely upon the memory, and is often lost in 
maturity. The scientific, while its details may be for- 
gotten, produces a habit of mind which is ever valua- 
ble and useful. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



131 



My own occupation has brought me into the study 
of grades and qualities of agricultural productions and 
their value. Nothing better than this could demon- 
strate the necessity for the agricultural college and its 
teachings. 

I trust the M. A. C. may continue in prosperity, and 
turn out good men for all the pursuits of life. 

Secretary Fowler offered a resolution of thanks to 
Prof. Totten for his valuable gift to the club ; adopted. 

The secretary stated that there was a small balance 
in the treasury. Mr. Myrick remarked that the club 
was in better condition than the United States treas- 
ury. 

The nominating committee reported list of officers 
which were elected ; also appointing Messrs. Thomp- 
son, 72, and Dickinson, 74, to draw up resolutions of 
respect as to deceased members, Somers, 72, and 
Towne, 74. 

Our venerable friend from Springfield, Bro. Birnie 
of the class of 71, closed the speaking with credit to 
himself and the club. He is a farmer and a good 
one. 

THE CLUB OFFICERS. 

Presidents. 

1886, Sammuel Clarence Thompson, 72, acting, 1886 

1886, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74, acting. 1886 
1889, Joseph Francis Barrett, 75, 1887 

1887, Samuel Clarence Thompson, C. E., 72, 1888 

1888, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., 

F. S. Sc, '82, 1889 

1889, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78, 1890 

1890, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74, 1892 

1892, Edgar Howard Libby, 74, 1893 

1893, Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81, acting, 1893 

1893, William Perkins Birnie, 71, 1893 

1894, James Henry Webb, 73, 1895 

1895, Joseph Edward Root, M. D., F. S. Sc.,76. 

Vice-Presidents. 

1886, Henry Francis Hubbard, 78, 1888 

1888, Samuel Clarence Thompson, C. E., 72, 1892 

1889, Frank Gordon Urner, 77, 1890 

1890, Edgar Howard Libby, 74, 1891 

1891, Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81, 1893 

1893, Alfred Armand Hevia, "83, 1894 

1894, John Clarence Cutter, M. D., 72, 1895 

1895, Herbert Myrick, '82. 



Second Vice-Presidents. 

889, Col. Asa Williams Dickinson, 74, 

890, Charles Elisha Young, M. D., '81, 

891, William Perkins Birnie, 71, 

892, Henry Francis Hubbard, 78, 

893, Hezekiah Howell, '85, 

894, Charles Augustus Goodrich, '93, 

895, Charles Edward Beach, '82. 

Third Vice-President. 
895, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78. 

Secretary- Treasurer. 
886, John Ashburton Cutter,M.D.,F.S,Sc.,'82, 
888, Alfred William Lublin, "84, resigned, 
893, Alvan Luther Fowler, C. E., '80. 
Choragus. 

888, Sandford Dwight Foot, 78, 

889, Joseph Edward Root, M. D. F.S. Sc. 

890, John Ashburton Cutter, M.D.,F.S.Sc. 

892, Frank Gordon Urner, 77, 

893, Harry Kirke Chase, "82, 
895, Prof. Chas. Loami Harrington, M 

herst, 70.) 

Historian. 
1895, John Ashburton Cutter, M. D., F. S. Sc 



1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 



1893 



1889 

76, 1890 

'82, 1892 

1893 

1895 

(Am- 



'82. 



A., 



THE MILITARY BALL. 

The second annual reception and Military Ball giv- 
en by the fraternities of the College was held on the 
evening of Feb. 14th and was the most successful and 
enjoyable social event ever held at the College. 
Much credit is due the committee for the successful 
outcome of the affair and to the student body who so 
willingly assisted in executing the plans of those who 
had the directing of the arrangements. 

The Military Ball last year was a venture and its 
success was so pronounced that it was thought best to 
repeat the experiment this year and the unlimited suc- 
cess of this year's effort proves beyond doubt that it 
is but one of a long series that is to follow. 

The members of the committee were, Mr. A. S. 
Kinney and Mr. C. I. Goessmann of the D. G. K. 
fraternity, Mr. P. A. Leamy, chairman, and Mr. J. 
A. Emrich of the Q. T. V. fraternity, Mr. M. E. 
Sellew and Mr. C. A. Norton of the P. S. K. frater- 
nity and Mr. Frank L. Clapp and Mr. C. A. Peters of 
the C. S. C. 



132 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The reception began at 8 o'clock and the grand 
march, composed of about eighty couples and led by 
Lieut, and Mrs. W. M. Dickinson, started at 10 
o'clock. Music was furnished by the academy or- 
chestra of Northampton, Prof. Watts leader. 

The patronesses were Mrs. H. H. Goodell, Mrs. W. 
M. Dickinson, Mrs. Chas. Wellington, Mrs. J. B. 
Lindsey and Miss Helena T, Goesssman. 

The following is a partial list of those present : 

Miss Emma Shepardson, Miss Minnie E. Bates, 
Miss Maud Kendrick, Miss Maud Paige, Miss Clara 
Woods, Miss Alice Thayer, Miss Delia A. Gilbert, 
Miss Cornelia Thompson, Miss Augusta C. Trott, 
Miss Lizzie Wallace, Miss L. Etta Holley, Miss Alice 
Maynard, Amherst ; Miss H. G. Myrick, Miss Jessie 
Hyde, Miss Mary E. Wiley, Smith College ; Miss 
Susie Wilson, Miss Maude L. Dickinson, Miss Alice 
Davidson, North Amherst ; Miss Jennie E. Carpen- 
ter, Mt. Holyoke college ; Miss Mattie Bardwell, 
Miss Helen M. Stebbins, Deerfield ; Miss Katherine 
Jacobs, Spencer ; Miss M. Elizabeth Morse, Miss 
Emma C. Alexander, Northampton ; Miss Mabel C. 
Ccok, Petetsham ; Miss Florence White, Brcokline ; 
Miss M. Christine Sanders, Southbridge ; Frank 
King, Easthampton ; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clark, Am- 
herst ; Mrs. H. H. Goodell, Prof, and Mrs. Charles 
Wellington, Lieutenant and Mrs. Walter M. Dickin- 
son, Dr and Mrs. J. B, Lindsay, Professor Babson, 
Professor and Mrs. C. S. Walker, Professor and Mrs. 
W. P. Brooks, Professor F. S. Cooley, Miss Bronson, 
Professor G. F. Mills, Professor and Mrs, E. J. Flint 
and Professor R. E. Smith. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

In the twenty-fifth report of the Bureau of Labor 
may be found an interesting article on the " Compen- 
sation of College Graduates." 

The Spraying of Plants. By E. G. Lodeman. This 
volume, the second in the Rural Science Series, con- 
tains a concise account of the history, principles, and 
practise of spraying. Accurate and complete informa- 
tion is furnished in regard to materials and formulas 
used in spraying, spraying machinery, and the action 
of insecticides and fungicides. Specific directions for 
spraying all cultivated plants are also given and in the 
appendix are contained the laws passed by various 
states with reference to spraying. 



Shakespeare's True Life. By James Walter. This 
volume contains a full account of the life of the great 
writer, including much new information obtained by 
careful search among the old families resident near 
Stratford. Many slanders usually connected with his 
life have been cleared away by the author. The illus- 
trations are especially interesting and aid in making 
the volume very valuable to all lovers of Shakespeare. 

The Animal Tuberculosis and their Relation to Human 
Tuberculosis. By Ed. Vocard, Professor of the Alfort 
Veterinary College. This work treats of tuberculosis 
in cattle and also in other domestic animals. The 
spread of this much feared disease among cattle and 
human beings has been widely discussed and the fact 
as demonstrated by the author that this disease is 
propagated almost wholly by contagion and very seldom 
by heredity makes this volume very interesting. In 
the latter part is described a scheme by which in 
Germany a healthy herd was bred from a severely 
infected one. 

Pasteurization and Milk Preservation. By J. H. 
Mourad. This little book discusses the various ways 
of preserving milk, especially the process of pasteur- 
izing it for home use or for market. It is, at present, 
almost the only volume which treats of the subject of 
pasteurization to any extent and so it should prove of 
much value as a practical reference book. 



Puer et puella 
Ambulant together, 
Magna sub umbrella 
Vocant de the weather. 
Very slippery via, 
Pedes slides from under, 
Puer non upholds her. 
Triste, triste blunder! 
Cadit on the ground. 
Sees a lot of stellae. 
Adolescens hastens, 
To aid of his puellae, 
"Rustic!" exclamat, 
"Re!inque me alone! 
Nunquam die mihi 
Til you for this atone!" 
Non diutius do they 
Ambulant together, 
Nunquam speak as they pass by 
Non etiam de the weather. 



-Ex. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



133 



lumni 



Students and alumni are request to contribute to this 
column. 

At a recent election of the State Board of Agricul- 
ture, Prof. S. T. Maynard, 72, was elected Botanist 
and Pomologist ; Prof. James B. Paige, '82, was 
elected Veterinarian; William Wheeler, 71, of Con- 
cord was elected Engineer. 

72. — Born, in Amherst, Feb. 13th, a daughter to 
Prof, and Mrs. Maynard. 

73. — A. H. Lyman of Mainslie, Mich., died 
Jan. 16th. 

'82. — Dr. W. E. Stone has been proffered the 
presidency of the Michigan Agricultural College at 
Lansing, Mich., but has declined and will remain in 
his present capacity as vice-president and professor of 
chemistry at Purdue University. 

'87. — Married, Augusto Luiz de Almeida e Eliza 
Lerte de Almeida. Participau a V. Ex. sem casa- 
mento, Riv. de Janerio 23 de Novembro de 1895. 

'87. — Married, Charles Herbert Watson to Miss 
Sylvina Brigham, on Wednesday, January the first, 
1896, at Newtonville, Mass. 

'88. Born in Amherst, Feb. 12th, a son to Prof, 
and Mrs. Cooley. 

'89. — Married, James Tyler Hutchings to Miss 
Freda Philippine Schinck, on Wednesday, Feb. 12, 
1896, at Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Hutchings 
were in Amherst for a few days last week, and will be 
here again during commencement week. 

'90. — F. W. Mossman has completed a course of 
lectures and work of Pasteurization at the Vermont 
Dairy School; and Feb. 3d began his duties as instruc- 
tor in all departments at the New Hampshire Dairy 
School, Durham, N. H. 

'92. — Dr. M. H. Williams has been appointed by 
the Secretary of Agriculture an inspector of meat of 
the New York Port. 

'93. — Born, Jan. 22, at Worcester, Mass., a son, 
Rasbern Blood, to Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Melendy. 
Address of Mr. Melendy is changed to 1 Dover 
St., Worcester, Mass. 



'94. — Married in Belchertown, Feb. 19th, Perley 
E. Davis to Miss Bessie L. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. W. Morse. Their future home will be in Dedham. 

'94. — Married at Purdys, Conn., George H. Mer- 
win to Miss Elsie Brown. 

'94. — Lowell Ma"nley and J. E. Gifford were at 
college for a few days last week. 

'95. — G. F. Billings read a paper before the Y. P- 
S. C. E. Local Union at Belchertown, Wednesday 
evening last, his subject being, " Work for the Look- 
out Committee." 

'95. — D. C. Potter is at college pursuing advanced 
studies. 



SONNET. 

Like as before the sun's great heat and light 
The silent stars do leave the firmament. 
And all the radiance of the moon is blent 

With his strong beams and ail her erstwhile might 

And beauty is fordone and lost to sight ; 

So on young love that doth some youth content 

Rises the sun of reason to dissent 
And put away the glamour of love-light. 

So it is ever with all things we care for, 
Labour and watch and guard and war and fare for, 
So it is with each thing we dare to cherish. 

Once fancy clothed them in her gay moonlight, 

But now that reason makes the heavens bright. 

Like as the stars before the sun they perish. 

— Idlesse in The Cynic. 

COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. ' 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 

CHARLES G. AYRES, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

;8S»At Seasonable Prices—Sir 

W. W. B 

MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



134 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THERE AR E TWO 
KINDS OF BICYCLES 



G 



There are no untried 
devices in 1896 Col- 
umbias. Every detail 
has been perfected by 
at least a year's use. 

Beautiful Art Catalogue for 
1896 of Columbia and Hart- 
ford Bicycles is free if you 
call upon any Columbia 
agent ; by mail from us for 
two 2-cent stamps. 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Factories and General Offices, Hartford, Conn. 

Branch Stores and Agencies in almost every city and 

town. If Columbias are not properly represented 

in your vicinity let us know. 




Speeial Attention Given to Famishing Spreads. 



^"fcrpfirtf r <2k ^©rfhows^. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



as&S^ 



k PhotofiraDher from Boston, 



fa \| S » y d 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



IF '96, PI. El 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 

146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Dnni D 



ILLIAfjDAND TOOL l^RL0f|S 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

M^ery, peed and Boarding Stable 

Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Street, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

B. K. B£0¥i\, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Houks : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 



"raieiiea] 



STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



\n 



"BlilS FOR VIOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAI 



'% V 



$1 



NORTHAMPTON. 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.53 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Proust attention given to students. 



10S Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 





COAL AND WOOD. 






THOMAS C. DILLON, 






DEALER in 




HARD 


AND FREE BURNING 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 


COALS 


Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 




Residence, South Prospect St. 





UTTLEFIELD'S 



WARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



GO TO- 



1895. 



LULL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC SDK 



FOR THE BEST WORK. 



Society, Glass and Group fek a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



E. R, BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 



harles B. 




NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 
AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS & CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 



sa&s* iffi-^wsi%jfe»^;' 7 - --:#-■ t * sssrs 



B«afliifc^^A=fea^^^^^^ s^sg^:??asgBSga 



Buy Hie Latest Fail Macbinery and lake Money. 

Do yon know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



UPERIORj 
JL.A-ND 

"Roller 




<&% 



v, weedER^, 
Write f or 
S Circulars 




1896 Catalogue just out, showing a large collection of 
Farming Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full 
directions for using and plantiug the same, free on applica- 
tion. 



ROSS 

162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



AMHEEST HOTJSE 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FA] 



•\VE HAVE PURE BRED 



Percheron Horses and Soutndown Stop, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AH1HERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

1CH S SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



•. ''I. 



A 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



Ch 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

S TO 12 _^_ Ts/L., l-SO TO 5 TP. M. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. M. CHAMBERLAIN, 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PHOENIX ROW 



PRICES REASONABLE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DllESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OE 

EXJBBSE GrOOHDS- 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



tigrHepa iritiff done while yon wait,*g& 



s rirasNix now. 



l/i&l 



BOAEeioxwo 



Livery, Fed mi Exchange Stab 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Earn, 



Amherst, 3Iass. 



M. 



N. SPEAR, 



okseiier, Stationer and Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT aud SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 



RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amhehst, Mass. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, PISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night oallj responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

* Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment 

Aggie Agent, O. 15*. PA1UMEH »S>y. 
Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

f&SA.TISFACTION Q-TT.A.K.^IsrTEIEID. e^S 2 
OFFICE : 

Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY k CO., 

Barge lo and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDEE. 

^"•SPECIAL RATES.,,©? 
Passenger to center, ------ joe. 

Passenger to Aggie, - 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, --.... 25c 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



TUB Populariti of 

Is WW we m Pleased to See. 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



., spigfli, 



MM Talis, Halters, Fimiisiiera. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JiLCKSOW & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



Er. W. BLDHBBTT & CD., 

Merchant Tailors 



■ AND DEALERS IN ■ 



READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, S3 up. 

ggp^Repairiug neatly done at short notice. 



Geo. W. EladgEtt & Ga. 



BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 



FOUNTAIN F» NS. 

Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



•^-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, & 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



c.4- 



OJHOIOJ3} COIVFECTIONBRY, 

FEESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may And himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 






AGGIE 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH 11, 1896. 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

P. A. LEAMY, '96, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. H. ROPER, '96, Business Manager. 

H. W. MOORE, '96. As'st Business Manager. 

H. T. EDWARDS. '96, Exchange. 

P. S. W. FLETCHER, '96, College Notes. 

J. L. BARTLETT, '97, Library Notes. 

C. A. KING. '97, Alumni Notes. 

J. M. BARRY. '97. Athletics. 

R. D. WARDEN, '98. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



t*.*9tVSt* V V,S^»tlM=>^ SSAH^KS. 



,d\ 



During the past two years that we (the Senior 
editors) of Life have been associated on the Board 
with Mr. J. L. Bartlett, '97, we have been most 
deeply impressed with the ability and faithfulness dis- 
played by him in the discharge of his editorial duties 
It was therefore with sincere and profound regret that 
we received his communication declining re-election 
for the ensuing year. We cannot but feel that the 
paper has lost one of its best men in the resignation of 
Mr. Bartlett, but in the selection of his successor and 
his associates we trust we leave the Life in worthy 
and capable hands, and that they will strive to emulate 
his praiseworthy example. 



The present board of editors close their labors with 
this issue of the Life and the management goes into 
the hands of our successors. We have prepared our 



last manuscript, corrected our last proof, turned over 
the waste basket to the new editor-in-chief and the 
editor's table is now undergoing a fresh coat of paint. 
We have labored to keep up the standard of the Life 
during our connection with it and we believe we have 
been fairly successful in our efforts. We have been 
independent in all our actions and have labored con- 
scientiously for the good of the college and the ad- 
vancement of the student body. But our day is 
passed and we must move on for our places are al- 
ready filled by better and more able men. 



While we are pursuing our studies here at Aggie it 
would be both interesting and instructive to keep 
posted on the doings of our sister colleges in other 
states. The most convenient and practical way to do 
this would be through correspondents from these col- 
leges to Aggie Life. Frequent short letters from the 
Maine and New Hampshire State colleges and the 
University of Vermont would be beneficial. It would 
create an interest in the work that is being done at 
these colleges and tend to unite us in brotherly love 
with those who are following the same lines of work in 
other states. It would also increase the interest in 
athletics and might lead to the formation of a League 
with these colleges. The rivalry to be champions 
would do more than anything else to develop first- 
class teams. When we stop to consider how many 
benefits might be derived from a correspondence with 
these colleges it seems as though it would be well 
worth while to try it. 



The following is the result of the vote at Yale for 
the favorite novel studied in the Modern Novels course, 
during the term : "Lorna Doone" 114; "Gentleman 
of France" 46; "Treasure,, Island" 28 ; "Luck of 
Roaring Camp" 17 ; "Esther Waters" 9 ; "Modern 
Instance" 9; "Phantom Rickshaw" 5 ; "A Suburban 
Pastoral" 4 ; "Marcella" 1. 



136 



AGGIE LIFE. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Abstract of an Address Delivered in the M. 

A. C. Chapel, March 8, by Prof. C. S. 

Walker. 

" Well done, good and faithful servant." Matt. 25 : 23. 

The Commonwealth mourns the death of Gov- 
ernor Greenhalge. It is fitting that the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College should pay its tribute of respect 
to the memory of him who was the President of its 
corporation. Two years ago he honored us with his 
presence at commencement. Paying a high tribute 
to its president and to the graduating class, he expressed 
his delight in the theses and in finding in them the 
sign that strength and brain are coming "back to the 
soil for inspiration, and that science, intelligence and 
culture are making Massachusetts the garden of the 
world. The college was looking forward to his coming 
again to sign the diplomas of the graduating class and 
to cheer us once more with eloquent words of inspira- 
tion. But to-day his white, dumb lips stir us to 
solemn, earnest thought. Let us heed the lessons of 
his life, 

Sometimes we tremble for the future of the Old 
Bay State when we think that of its 2,238,943 inhabi- 
tants 29.35 per cent were born in foreign lands, that 
56.01 per cent were born of foreign parentage, that 
these are not on farms as our fathers were, but are 
crowded in cities, 70 per cent of the whole population 
living in cities of over 8,000, and that for every child 
born of New England stock two or three are born of 
foreign parentage. The sceptre is passing from the 
blue blood of the Puritans into the power of men in 
whose veins flows the blood of all peoples of the 
earth, men no longer of one mind, no longer of the 
same religion. But when we remember who was F. 
T. Greenhalge, what Massachusetts did for him and 
what he did for Massachusetts our fears for the Com- 
monwealth are allayed. 

Frederick T. Greenhalge was born of foreign par- 
entage, not even in Massachusetts, but in an English 
factory town where he lived until he was 13 years old. 
Then he came to live in one of the tenement houses 
belonging to the Merrimac mills of Lowell his father 
being in the employ of the corporation. Massachu- 
setts gave this boy a common school education. 



From the high school, as the first scholar in his class, 
he went to Harvard where he remained until his junior 
year when the death of his father compelled him to 
leave his class and earn his own living. He taught 
school, he entered the service of the commissary 
department of the army until sickness sent him home 
from North Carolina. But he never ceased his 
studies. He studied law. He gained his degree 
from Harvard in 1870. He worked and studied, and 
studied and worked. Massachusetts took this son of a 
factory employee, educated him, gave him a fair 
chance in life and advanced him rapidly from one 
station to another, making him special justice, city 
solicitor, member of the school committee, member 
of the city council, mayor, representative in the legis- 
lature, member of congress and finally governor again 
and again. Massachusetts cpened to him sccial life 
gave him for his wife the daughter of Gov. Andrew's 
Lieutenant Governor and appointed him to important 
positions in the social world. 

What did Governor Greenhalge do for Massachusetts? 
In all things he proved himself a faithful, a good ser- 
vant. He did three things of paramount importance, 
especially at this juncture of our history. (1) Resist- 
ing the tendency to centralization of power, he defended 
by his vetoes local self-government. (2) By his 
vetoes he protected the general welfare from the 
attacks of private gain, taking the side of the people 
against corporate monopolies. (3) He threw his, 
whole power in favor of religious freedom and against 
all attempts to bring religious prejudice into political 
contests. 

His life is an inspiration to the young to make their 
lives sublime. He exemplified the truth that the 
essential elements of success are self-reliance, self- 
restraint, self-control, thoroughness in every task 
assigned. His one failure, his failure to live to 80 
instead of dying at 52, should teach all the young to 
guard every drop of blood, every ounce of power, every 
particle of vitality and waste none, so that they may 
accumulate a capital of life that shall carry them 
through the struggles of the coming century. His 
chief virtue and his greatest element of power lay in 
convictions of duty and his immovable determination 
to prove true to them obeying them in every deed. 
Of all his words none are more worthy of remembrance 
than those uttered by him as he accepted his third 



AGGIE LIFE. 



137 



nomination to the chief office of the Commonwealth : 
" I must hold fast to the principles by which I have 
endeavored to guide and regulate my course, and in 
humble imitation of the great reformer say : ' So help 
me God I cannot do otherwise.' " 

It is the recognition of this element of his character 
that leads us to never despair of the Commonwealth 
and to endorse every word of Ex-Governor Long, 
spoken as he nominated Governor Greenhalge for his 
third term of office: " Massachusetts has come to 
have faith in the ability, the integrity and the courage 
of her present Governor. Not by any winning person- 
ality : not by the grace and rare eloquence of speech 
which are his ; not by the aptness with which on many 
occasions he has represented her within and beyond 
her borders ; but by his unflinching discharge of his 
duty, as he has seen it, and by his fidelity to his own 
convictions he has won her approval and she now bids 
us say to him, " Well done good and faithful servant." 

FREDERICK T. GREENHALGE. 

Memorial services were held in the college chapel 
on Monday afternoon at 2-30 in honor of the late 
Governor and were attended by all the students and a 
considerable number of the faculty. A salute of sev- 
enteen guns was fired and the flag was displayed at 
half mast during the day. A committee from the stu- 
dents made the arrangements and Mr. Marshall con- 
ducted the services. Prayer was offered by Rev. C. 
S. Walker, the college chaplain. Lieut. W. M. 
Dickinson was the first speaker. He said : 

To-day our flag is flying at half mast, and a salute 
of 17 guns has been fired from our cannon as a token 
of respect and of honor shown to the memory of the 
late chief executive of the state of Massachusetts. 
Others have, and will tell you of the man. I would 
call your attention to the principle which has caused 
these demonstrations to-day; demonstrations of respect 
and honor, extending from the rock-bound coast of the 
Atlantic to the west of our Berkshire hills. But these 
demonstrations are not for the man, they stand for the 
office he has so worthily filled for more than two years. 
They are tokens of respect and honor to the first posi- 
tion in this our commonwealth, tokens of respect to 
the chief executor of our state laws, to the com- 
mander-in-chief of our armed state forces. The 



whole nation might well join in showing honor to the 
memory of one who has ever shown himself a loyal 
citizen and a true patriot, not only in the representa- 
tive halls on Beacon hill ; not only as the chief execu- 
tive of our commonwealth, but in the national halls of 
Congress has he borne with honor and dignity the true 
spirit of an American citizen. And it is to this I would 
call your attention ; our flag, the flag of the Union, is 
flying at half mast, as a symbol that an office, equal 
in respect and honor in each of the 45 states, that 
after the 4th of next July, will be represented by a star 
on our common colors, is vacant, and that he who so 
lately filled that office is being laid away and will be 
seen no more. But the office still lives, and other 
men wiil sit in the chair so worthily filled by him, and 
they will be entitled to receive, by virtue of the office 
they hold, equal respect to that you are to-day giving, 
and this respect is due them from us who are citizens 
of the state of Massachusetts. Yet there is a higher 
duty before you all, and one calling for greater respect 
and devotion, and that duty is the one you owe to your 
country. By your country I do not mean this small 
space, crossed and recrossed by the beautiful and 
granite-capped hills which so closely encircle us, but 
of a country, a part of whose wide domain is always in 
sunlight, extending westward from the storm-washed 
rocks of the New England shore, to the farthest 
extremity of the Aleutian Isles — from the present 
frozen shores of the great lakes to the ever tropical 
climate of the Mexican gulf — a country with 70,000,- 
000 of people — a country of free speech and free 
religion ; a country covered with schools and churches 
— a country to be proud of ; a country to respect ; and 
above all, if need be, a country to die for. This is the 
spirit which should be taught in all our public schools, 
encouraged at the fireside, and in the churches that 
the aim of every boy and young man might be to make 
this our common country, united — one for all, for in 
unison only is there strength ; and the day will come 
when one could wish for no other epitaph than this, 
He lived and died an American citizen. 

Dr. Wellington spoke in part as follows : — Fellow 
Students, as members of the only state college in this 
Commonwealth we feel closer to those in authority 
than those of any other institution can. Six years ago 
about this time the late Governor gave the students of 
this institution a lecture which was the results of his 



138 



AGGIE LIFE. 



study of the English poets. A year ago last commence- 
ment he also spoke to us and those who were present then 
remember how he filled all those present with inspira- 
tion. For the last one hundred and sixteen years the 
Commonwealth has been presided over by thirty-eight 
governors. Gov. Greenhalge was the thirty-eighth 
and the fifth to die in office. Although we are in a 
technical institution where we spend a large part of 
our time in studying objects of matter, yet there is 
nothing which demands our attention so much as the 
study of character. On this occasion, although .filled 
with sadness we can profitably spend many hours in 
studying the life of this man. * * * * We have a 
great deal to thank him for. We love to thank him 
for his invincible charge against religious bigotry, also 
for his bold stand against monopolies. Fellow Stu- 
dents I think we may well spend the rest of this day in 
a careful consideration of the life and character of 
this man. 

Prof. Mills followed and paid an elegant tribute to 
the dead Governor. He said. There is an especial 
propriety in those who are connected with this college 
meeting as we do this afternoon to lay our wreath on 
the grave of the departed governor. Not only because 
he so ably discharged his duties, not only because he 
has shown an interest in the College, in its President, 
in its work, but because we are connected with this 
institution we should bear our part of the universal 
grief of the Commonwealth. He then spoke of the 
death of Ex-Gov. Robinson and showed by compari- 
son that both were the idea of the state of Massachu- 
setts. The developement of the late governor from a 
politician to an ideal statesman were clearly brought 
out during his discourse. He pointed out the lesson 
to be learned by this growth and development, and 
said in closing, There is another lesson to be learned 
from this occasion. There comes a time when this 
lesson need not be the lesson of gloom, it may be the 
lesson of joy and hope like the sunlight. The lesson 
even of death. It comes to our great men, it comes 
to those in the humbler walks of life. It may be only 
the messenger of joy. 

The following resolutions were adopted :■ 
Whereas : An All-wise Father has removed from this life 
the chief executive of the Commonwealth, Fredrick T. 
Greenhalge, we, the students of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College recognizing him as the official representative of 



the State to the College, as a firm friend of education, and as 
a loyal supporter of this institution, do hereby adopt the fol- 
lowing resolutions : — 

Resolved: That, we the student body of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College in recognition of the many kindnesses 
bestowed upon this institution by him in his official capacity, 
express our appreciation by fitting memorial services. 

Resolved, That the Student body extend its heartfelt sym- 
pathy to the friends and family of the deceased in this, their 
hour of bereavement. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his 
family, and also, that a copy be published in the college 
paper. 



forvtributed. 



SCHLATTER AND FAITH. 

" Faith," saith Saint-Beuve, " has disappeared. 
Science, let people say what they will, has destroyed it." 

A few months ago, the State of Colorado, and in 
fact the whole western world, was ringing with the 
fame of a strange man who had appeared in the city 
of Denver with claims of divine power of healing. 
This man was Francis Schlatter. Along with these 
remarkable claims of divine power came the story of 
his strange aimless wanderings in the western states- 
These circumstances, together with the facts that he 
himself was a man absolutely without means, that he 
refused all offers of help or reward, and moreover that 
his work was done almost entirely among the poor and 
needy classes, made him for a time, the most talked 
of man at least in the city of Denver and possibly even 
in the United States. 

As is usual in such cases, the press of the country 
had enormously exaggerated the facts, telling wonder- 
ful stories of the numerous cases of troublesome dis- 
eases which had disappeared before his magic touch. 
On the other hand scientific men absolutely denied 
the truth of any and all such stories and one party went 
so far as to offer through one of the Denver dailies a 
considerable reward for authentic evidence pointing 
toward even one actual cure. The offer was never 
taken up and Schlatter has finally disappeared into the 
mountains of New Mexico. Nevertheless, the fact 
still remains that he was daily for many weeks, the 
objective point for hundreds of waiting people, the lame, 
the halt, the blind, men, women and children of all 
ages, races and faiths, but with the common faith that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



139 



Schlatter could heal them. At six o'clock in the 
morning the first place would be occupied and the line 
of waiting people would gradually extend itself along 
the little street, around a corner and finally a hundred 
yards or more up a short hill entirely away from sight 
of the man for whom they waited. At eight o'clock 
Schlatter would appear and begin his work. All day 
long, week after week, in sun and rain, bare-headed, 
refusing all offers of help or reward, this strange 
man would grasp hand after hand, retaining each 
silently for a moment, or with an occasional remark or 
question, glancing now and then into the faces of his 
patients, but usually paying no attention to the crowd 
with which he was always surrounded. 

On the day of your correspondent's visit, Schlatter 
was standing in his usual place just inside the picket 
fence which ran along the sidewalk in front of the little 
house of Alderman Fox. Just outside the fence and 
running along it for thirty or forty feet had been erected 
a rough railing between which and the fence passed 
the stream of diseased but believing humanity which 
flowed all day long towards this fountain cf health. 
Schlatter was dressed in a black shirt and gray cordu- 
roy suit ; was bare headed and in his shirt sleeves. 
His hair was black and long and descended to his 
shoulders giving him a peculiar aspect. He would 
grasp the hand of a patient with his right hand and 
would take four or five tightly rolled handkerchiefs in 
his left. Hundreds of people carried " blessed " hand- 
kerchiefs for months and some are carrying them still. 
Schlatter said that the influence of a handkerchief 
which he had "blessed" was as good as the touch of 
his own hand. Some enterprising Yankees, finding 
that handkerchiefs were in demand erected a booth 
close by, advertised, " Handkerchiefs, blessed by 
Schlatter, twenty-five cents each," and carried on a 
brisk and remunerative business. Peanut venders, 
photograph sellers, and hawkers of all sorts hung on 
che outskirts of the crowd which gathered daily, some 
to test the strength of their faith and some to look on 
and wonder. At two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 
day in question, there were certainly seven hundred 
people in line waiting for the touch of Schlatter's hand 

In regard to the truth of the' man's claims, the evi- 
dence is uncertain. On hearing it one is impressed 
rather with the credulity of his patients than with the 
power of the man. He claimed to be endowed of « the, j 



Father " with the power of curing, by the touch of his 
hand, all human ills. Thousands believed him and 
scores testified to help and even to actual cures bor- 
dering on the miraculous. Moreover, in spite of the 
fact that nothing could be proved in black and white 
hundreds continued daily to gather in his presence. It 
might have been the fact that Schlatter was a poor man 
and worked without pay that attracted so many. What- 
ever was the attractive power, power it certainly was, 
for hundreds followed him and would follow him to-day, 
were his movements followable. Indeed, the Indians 
are said to be now following him in the mountains of 
New Mexico. One thing is positive : That faith, in 
spite of Saint-Beuve, still exists. 

Thomas P. Foley, '95. 
Montclair, Colo., Feb. 8, 1896. 



THE HIGHER EDUCA TION. 
The end and purpose of the higher education should 
be the culture and development of the thinking mind. 
Its aim should be serious thought. How expressive 
are these phrases — the thinking mind, serious thought 
— they lie at the basis and are the very essentials of 
their education. To build up and educate the mind, 
is, and must be the proper design of all education. 

Take for example one who is beginning the study of 
some foreign language. He tries to determine for 
himself the meaning and relation of certain words 
which form a sentence. Surely his object is not to 
hold these rules and the knowledge acquired of the 
framework of the sentence as mere things of mem- 
ory. These must be understood, but the worker 
should keep in mind that they are to be observed only 
for the sake of what is beyond them. They are to be 
considered as the means, not the end. When the 
seeker knows the thought of the sentence in its exact- 
ness, he has secured the reward. Thus it is through- 
out our lives. Thoughts and truths are to be se- 
cured in many places; they seem to await our com- 
ing. We seek for them, make them our own, and go 
on our way with wider vision, more thoroughly trained 
powers, and with a capacity ready to expound far more 
new thoughts as they are offered on every side. 

As with reading and language in this regard, so 
with everything that we study it must help us on our 
way, each in its own way must stir and help the mind. 
This, then, is what the higher education means. To 



140 



AGGIE LIFE. 



have rich thoughts, serious thoughts, at any and all limes 
which are worthy, and on reaching that point of excel- 
lence where we have everything good to think about, 
and the power to think about everything good, we will 
overflow and so prove ourselves benefactors to all we 
know and see. 

Especially among American people there is a ten- 
dency to educate along special lines only, following 
the idea that education is good only as it brings in 
something in the material line. So often we hear, 
"We want the practical man for the practical age,'' 
"Be educated in one thing only." There are many 
people who by reason of the necessity of their lives 
must be confined to a comparatively single line of 
mental action ; but if started on the right road to de- 
velopment of mind in youth they might now have 
been able to enjoy many pleasant changes, but as it 
is, their minds go round in little grooves-, as it were, 
week after week and year after year, what wonder is 
it that statistics show our asylums increasing in num- 
bers and suicides more frequent. 

The human mind is made with all powers not with 
one. To exercise only one power, or but half the 
whole, is as unreasonable as to do the same with any 
part of the physical body : a harmonious development, 
as some one has said, should be the aim. The one 
gift adapting the individual to one line of living and 
working may become the leading gift of life, but this 
may not exclude the reasonable development of other 
gifts. We may know literature, and art, and sciences 
but not equally well, and still be able to give our se- 
rious thoughts to each. 

Who knows that results are greater when the indi- 
vidual thinks and understands only one thing? The 
results that are seen may, perchance, be greater than 
this, as relating to all cases will need proving. 
But who can tell of those unseen? Here is in- 
fluence, and that it may be wide-searching and 
wholesome, a rich mind and soul filled out by educa- 
tion to their fullness of culture and beauty are 
necessary. 

In considering the higher education in its true 
sense, that it is for the growth and upbuilding of the 
human mind, do we not find that we have solved that 
question upon which so much has been said and writ- 
ten, namely : Should higher education be given to 
sons and daughters alike? As Timothy Dwight puts 



it, "The womanly mind is just as important, just as 
beautiful, just as much a divine creation with wide 
reaching possibilities as is the manly mind." 

The woman's life is the home life it is said, and 
that the home is the place for comfort and not for 
thinking. This is the very lowest idea of home. We 
ought to find more life giving thought here than else- 
where for here is where the the child's mental im- 
pulses and where continual incentive should be found 
in youth and maturity. It is the intelligent mother 
who leads her child to form habits of attention, in- 
dustry, application, virtue, reflection and honesty that 
are so necessary to true education : The wise teach- 
er that builds on the new foundation thus formed : 
the truly educated man or woman that goes on grow- 
ing each year. 

Judging from the history of all other nations the 
coming era in American history will be one of devel- 
opement, and on the schools and households of the 
present age rests the duty of preparing the coming 
generation for this change. If the duty is neglected 
in the rush after wealth that is so characteristic of 
our age, we have failed, if discharged faithfully we 
have succeeded. "Bill." 



CREMA TION. 

Every period in history is marked by characteristics 
peculiar to itself. In ancient Rome we had an age of 
learning ; in the days of Napoleon we had an age 
marked by brilliant military manoeuvres, and to-day 
at the close of the nineteenth century, we are passing 
through an age that must ever go down in history as 
the age of progress. The days of custom and tradi- 
tion are fast passing away. No longer are men con- 
tent to believe because some one else has believed. 
Science and reason are the factors that enter into and 
decide the questions of life to-day. 

Man has learned to live according to the scientific 
laws of life and in nearly all respects is willing to obey 
these laws and shape his life accordingly. While we 
notice the prevalence of this spirit of progress, it can- 
not but be observed that in our every day life custom 
and sentiment still hold sway over the hearts of men 
to a greater or less degree, and often to such an 
extent as to threaten the welfare of society. Though 
this sentiment is felt in many ways, probably in none 
other is it so strong as in the custom of interment or 
burial of the dead. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



141 



The associations that cluster about death and burial 
of the dead are of a kind to ever foster sentiment 
even though reason may be debarred. We have the 
custom of burial of the dead coming down from our 
ancestors, a part as it were of the religion of our 
fathers and any departure from this custom must at 
first seem to be almost sacrilegious. The old burying 
ground, so fitly termed God's Acre, with its whisper- 
ing pines and soft greensward, its moss-grown monu- 
ments and air of peace and rest, must ever strongly 
appeal to the imagination as the most fitting resting 
place of the loved ones gone before. And thus the 
temptation arises to let custom and sentiment have 
full sway. We have learned to believe that " ashes to 
ashes and dust to dust," must be connected with cer- 
tain scenes and certain customs, any change of which 
is neither desirable nor right. We look upon burial of 
the dead as a custom and yet few know its origin or 
its history. In ancient Greece and Rome burning on 
the pyre was the almost universal custom, but when 
the Christian religion became a power in the state its 
followers hastened to abolish this custom substituting 
it for burial, and so it is that burial of the dead has 
always been considered a part of religion, not because 
it really is a part of religion, but because the custom 
was first practiced by the followers of Christ in oppo- 
sition to the custom of the pagans of burning their 
dead. Then to, in those early days, the Christians 
learned to look upon the graves of their saints and 
martyrs with the greatest reverence, a feeling that has 
been transmitted through all succeeding generations 
even to the_ present day. 

As long as ignorance and superstition held sway the 
question of burial of the dead was sure to escape criti- 
cism, but with the increasing knowledge that must 
accompany the truly progressive age, even the most 
sacred custom had to stand before the light of reason. 
Thus it was that a few years ago a few men began to 
question the advisability of some other means of the 
disposition of dead bodies than by the common 
method of interment. These ideas and beliefs met 
with the most violent opposition, and yet in spite of 
this the seeds of distrust were sown and the results must 
follow. What have been these results ? A large and 
ever increasing number of people who believe that 
burial of the dead is but a relic of the past in no way 
adopted or suited to modern civilization, guch was 



the origin of cremation. It was found that burial of 
the dead was a most unsatisfactory and unwise custom 
and that the best method of disposition of the dead 
that could take its place, was burning or cremation. 

The reason of greatest importance why cremation 
should take the place of burial is from a sanitary 
standpoint. It was the question of sanitation that first 
led to the consideration of the question of cremation 
and it is because of sanitary improvement that crema- 
tion receives its support to-day. It has been found on 
investigating the causes of disease that the graveyard 
is a most dangerous enemy to the public health. As 
long as population is small and scattered this danger 
is not so great, but the day is coming, and to some 
extent has already come, when the large graveyards 
near our centers of civilization will be a source of the 
greatest danger. It is not possible to here quote the 
statistics of disease, and the effects on the public 
health of graveyards as shown by these statistics. It 
is sufficent to say however that the danger has not 
been over-estimated. 

The process of cremation from a sanitary stand- 
point is a perfect method of disposition of dead bodies. 
All germs are destroyed and all danger of the future 
propagation of'disease by these germs is overcome. 

From financial considerations the method of crema- 
tion is vastly superior to the old ways of burial. The 
immense cost of funerals in the United States is very 
little understood or appreciated and the fact that cre- 
mation would do away with all, or nearly all of this 
expense, is an important consideration. 

The question is however primarily, one where love 
of custom, sentiment and tradition stand in opposition 
to reason, and in a period where reason rules, reason 
must triumph while custom and tradition give way to 
scientific facts. x. y. z. 



AFTER TEA. 

Confusion in the hallway 

Betokens tea is o'er: 
"Enjoyed myself immensely," 

He murmurs at the door. 

Says Ethel, charming hostess, 

As cunning as an elf, 
"Your compliment is doubtful, 

Since you've enjoyed yourself!" 

— The Tech. 



142 



AGGIE LIFE. 



£o11eg? ^lo-t?s- 



— Local contributions to the Armenian fund have 
reached a total of over $400. 

— D. C. Potter, '95, addressed the Scientific Club 
Monday evening on " Determination of Sex." 

— The Dairy School has closed after a very suc- 
cessful course. Prof. Michels has returned to his 
home in Wisconsin. 

— The '96 class pictures have arrived and give 
general satisfaction. Hastings is an artist of the first 
class in both cabinet and group work. 

— The second drawing of the Chess Club is as fol- 
lows : Baxter, '98, vs. Kinsman, '98 ; Moore, '96, vs. 
Goessman, '97 ; H. F. Allen 97, vs. 

— E. D. Howe, master of the State Grange and one 
of our trustees, attended the Pomona Grange meet- 
ing at Amherst, Thursday, March 5, and also visited 
the college. 

— Prof. Wellington lectured before the Natural 
History Society last Friday on " Chemical Architec- 
ture." His lecture was one of the most pleasing of 
the series. 

— Our Polo team was to have played at Storrs, 
Conn., last Saturday buj, as usual, the weather was 
unfavorable. The men have been practicing faithful- 
ly of late and we had hoped to see one more good 
game this season. 

— The prize drill to-morrow will take place at the 
usual drill hour, 1 1-30, instead of in the evening as 
had been planned. Capt. Pettit, Military Instructor at 
Yale University will act as judge. Forty cadets have 
entered in the contest. 

— Dr. Goessmann attends to-day at New Haven, a 
meeting of the Inspectors of Fertilizers for Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut, to 
fix,, for the ensuing year, the price of Potash, Nitro- 
gen and Phosphoric Acid in commercial fertilizers. 

— The Agricultural, Botanical, Military, Chemical 
and Entomological Departments were well represented 
at the recent Advertising Carnival. The Band fur- 
nished music for the occasion and showed remarkable 
skill considering the difficulties under which they have 
labored. 



— The newspaper articles by members of the 
Senior class were judged by Prof. Mills instead of the 
Life Board as was expected. The papers by P. A. 
Leamy, H. W. Moore, H. T. Edwards and S. W. 
Fletcher were selected as best representing the form 
of expression, and will appear in successive issues of 
Aggie Life. 

— The subject for discussion in the senior debate 
Friday, March 6, was " Should bi-metalism be 
adopted by the United States independently of other 
nations?" Debaters, Fletcher and Hammar for the 
affirmative ; Harper and Jones for the negative. The 
merits of the debate were decided in the affirmative ; 
the merits of the question in the negative. 

— The following men are candidates for the various 
positions on the base-ball team : Catcher, Leamy, 
Capen : Pitcher, Harper, Read, Shaw, Goessmann, 
J. S. Eaton, Cheney ; 1st base, Edwards, J. S. Eaton, 
Goessman, Turner ; 2nd base, Shaw, Warden, Emrich, 
E. W. Poole ; 3rd base, Emrich, Thompson ; Dutcher, 
Short, Marshall, Read, Canto ; Out-fields, Norton, Ed- 
wards, Hinds, Holt, Capen, E. W. Poole, Courtney, 
Wright, '98, Wright, 99, Hooker, Colburn, J. W. Al- 
den, Clark, '98. 

— The lecture, Feb. 26, by Prof. Southwick e-n 
" Hamlet ; the Man of Will," was of especial interest 
to members of the English Literature class who have 
studied somewhat the personality and power of 
Shakespeare's characters. His rendering of Hamlet 
was what could be expected from a thorough student 
and admirer of the " divine poet." To-night Rev. 
A. E. Winship of Boston, editor of the Journal of Edu- 
cation will speak on " Our boy out of School." 

The graduation theses of the senior class are dis- 
tributed among the various departments as follows : 
Agriculture, Burrington, Tsuda, Hammar ; Botany, 
Kinney ; Chemistry, Pentecost, Shepard, Saito ; 
Engineering, Kramer ; English, De Luce, Sastre ; 
Entomology, Cook, I. C. Poole, E. W. Poole, Shultis, 
Nichols ; Horticulture, Moore, Marshall, Read, 
Fletcher ; Mathematics, Clapp ; Military, Leamy ; Polit- 
ical Economy, Edwards, Jones and Sellew ; Veterinary, 
Nutting; Agriculture and Veterinary, Roper and Shaw; 
Agriculture, Chemistry and Veterinary, Harper, 






AGGIE LIFE. 



143 



— The baseball management announces the follow- 
ing schedule of games for the season : April 18, Hay- 
denville at Amherst: April 29, Trinity at Hartford; 
May 9, Vermont Academy at Saxton's River ; May 20, 
Williston at Amherst ; May 23, Vermont at Amherst ; 
June 3, Williston at Easthampton. Games have also 
been arranged with Trinity at Amherst, Mt. Hermon 
at Amherst and Worcester Tech. at Worcester, but 
at present writing the dates have not yet been defi- 
nitely settled. 

— We would respectfully ask the faculty if they see 
the justice in the following arrangement of the 85% 
system : A man receives 85 as a term mark in all 
studies but one. In this study he is not given any 
term mark because the professor wishes the class to 
take an examination. The whole class is obliged to 
stay over till the appointed examination hour and be 
examined on that subject. He has had no chance to 
get 85 and must sacrifice two or three days of vaca- 
tion (and these two or three days means a good deal 
to a student) just because no opportunity has been 
given him to escape the examination. This does not 
seem reasonable to us. 

— At a meeting of the Aggie Life Board, Friday, 
March 6; the following men were elected to member- 
ship for the ensuing year: C. I. Goessmann.C. A. 
King, '97, J. M. Barry, '97, F. W. Barclay, '97, G. D. 
Leavens, '97, R. D. Warden, '98, A. Montgomery, '98, 
G. H. Wright, '98, W. D. Hinds, '99. The new board 
have elected the following officers : Editor-in-chief, F. 
W. Barclay, '97 ; business manager, J. M. Barry, '97 
assistant business manager, A. Montgomery, '98. J. L. 
Bartlett, '97, declined re-election. He has been an able 
and conscientious worker for the paper during his con- 
nection with the board of editors, and we regret that 
circumstances render it impossible for him to continue 
in its service. 

— Why can not some poetical genius in our midst 
write a College song which shall embody in part 
that strong love for Alma Mater, that full apprecia- 
tion of all she has been to us and done for us, un- 
folding and developing the best powers of true and 
noble manhood, in short, that good old Aggie spirit 
which we feel is coming more and more to character- 
ize her sons wherever they may be. "Here's to Ag- 
gie College" can hardly be called an Aggie song, for 



the words and music are borrowed almost wholly 
from a sister college. We want a distinctly Aggie 
song, words and music the composition of her own 
sons. The Life would be pleased to receive and 
print contributions to this end. As a stimulus to in- 
vention, cannot some alumnus or student offer a prize 
for the best written Aggie song the merits of each 
production to be decided by a committee from the 
faculty. Here is an opportunity for a little loyal 
service. 

— Thursday evening, March 5th, '96 held a class 
meeting to receive reports from various committees 
and act upon other questions of importance. A report 
from the Class Cup committee met with the usual 
demonstration. After an extended and heated debate 
the place in which the class supper is to be held was 
decided. It was voted to make the '96 Senior Prom- 
enade a Military Ball, similar to that recently given 
by the College fraternities. Next came the cap and 
gown question, which met with almost unanimous ap- 
proval. It was voted that the class of '96 adopt the 
cap and gown, and a committee consisting of Da Luce, 
Edwards and Nutting were appointed to make all ar- 
rangements in regard to the matter. We doubt not 
but that this action will meet with the disapproval of 
many of our faculty and alumni, but we fail to see 
wherein lies the great superiority of a literary over a 
scientific student which prevents the latter from en- 
joying the same privileges and distinctions as the 
former. This is a scientific College. Its graduates 
are occupying positions of trust and honor in the scien- 
tific world. We claim that the cap and gown is not 
necessarily the distinctive dress of a B. A. and if it 
can in any way make our College life more what it 
should be, then the candidates for a B. Sc. have a 
perfect right to adopt it as a form of dress. 

— With the present issue the old board of editors 
complete their alloted task and leave to other and, we 
trust, abler men the duties and responsibilities of our 
calling. But before making our final bow under the 
public eye, and setting sail once more on the even 
and peaceful channel of private life, we wish to ex- 
press in a few words the feeling of regret which comes 
to us as we are about to sever our connection with 
the College paper, a regret which springs only from 
parting with that which has been to us an inspiration 



144 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and a help. For, in the spirit of true College loyalty , 
we have looked upon our connection with Aggie Life 
only as an opportunity for repaying in part the deep 
debt of gratitude which we owe to our Alma Mater 
for what she has been to us. We have endeavored, 
through the columns of this paper, to extend her in- 
fluence, to raise her standard, to draw her sons 
together in loyal and sympathetic fellowship. 
This has been our object, and to this end alone have 
we directed our best efforts. But, at the close of our 
apprenticeship, we realize that in this, as in every oth- 
er service, the giver receives more than he puts 
forth. We feel that, in our efforts to advance the best 
interests of our Alma Mater, we have unconsciously 
gained thereby an education and a training which will 
enable us in after life to overcome more readily many 
of the obstacles which lie along the pathway to suc- 
cess. And so, with a sincere interest in the future 
welfare of the paper, we can give the new board of 
editors no better advice than this which comes from 
our own experience. The College first ; personal 
advancement last. Let your one ambition be to sustain 
the good name of old Aggie, and just so surely in the 
end will come to you that consciousness of well 
rewarded labor which comes to us to-day. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Criminal Sociology. By Eurico Ferri. In this vol- 
ume the problem of crime is considered in three 
chapters. The first, on the Data of Criminal Anthro- 
pology, treats of individual conditions tending to pro- 
duce crime ; the second, on the Data of Criminal 
Statistics, is an examination of the adverse social 
conditions tending to drive certain sections of the 
population into crime ; while the third chapter, on 
Practical Reforms, aims to show how crime may be 
better prevented. 

History of Nineteenth Century Literature. ( 1 780— 
1895.) By George Saintsbury. This volume takes 
up the principal authors who have written during the 
last century except those still living. Poets, novelists, 
historians, journalists, scientific writers, and many 
others are discussed in separate chapters, and in the 
conclusion are pointed out the changes of style during 
the century, and the present condition of Literature. 

Heligoland as an Ornithological Observatory. By 
Henrich Gatke. The little island of Heligoland situ- 



ated in the North Sea is peculiarly fitted for observing 
the migrations of birds. For fifty years Mr, Gatke has 
studied the phase of bird-life from his observatory on 
the island and in this volume he gives the results of 
his observations to the public. The principal subjects 
considered are the direction, altitude, and velocity of 
the migration flight, and the causes and methods of 
migration. Also there is included an account of all 
the birds observed in Heligoland, three hundred and 
ninety-eight in all. 



E^cham^S" 



TO AN IDEAL. 

Dear love, if I could tell thee how the thought 

Of thy pure beauty seemeth to reveal 

Those deeper lights which outward mists conceal, 

The hidden threads in finer colors wrought, 

Then, half content, the path so vainly sought 

Might easy grow; ambitious, dormant lain, 

Awake like flowers touched by summer rain 

To bear new fruits, unknowing and untaught, 

There is no true conception, yet I pray 

To rest secure beliving in the rise 

Of inward good, a long, undying day, 

Half morn, half even, where no tempest lies, 

But mellow meadows stretching far away 

In pleasant shade beyond the quiet skies, 

— Percy Louis Shaw in Harvard Advocate. 

MY SHIPS. 

Vast shadow waves of the years to come. 

I dream on the golden strand, 
Of the phantom ships ye are bringing down 

From the future's unknown land. 
Silently, surely thro' storm and shine 
They are coming, those fateful ships of mine. 

Great white-winged sails in the wanton wind 

Flutter their signals 1 feel, 
And I strain my eyes thro' the blinding mist 

For the flash of the foam-flecked keel. 
Patiently, hopefully on thro' the night 

I am waiting the gleam of the pilot light. 

Dear human hearts that are mine by right, 

Laurel with myrtle wreathed, 
And crosses that glitter with diamonds of tears 

Are the cargoes to me bequeathed. 
Swiftly and safely, oh haste ye, my own, 
By the winds of Eternal Goodness blown. 

— 0. W. in Cornell Era. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



M5 



lumm 



'74. Daniel G. Hitchcock of Warren was recently 
chosen a delegate to the Congressional convention. 

'90. Charles H . Jones has left Amherst for Burling- 
ton, Vt., where he has an excellent position in the 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

'93. Malcolm A. Carpenter and Maud Carpenter, 
married in Brattleboro, February 24, at the home of 
the bride. At home after March 15, Park Road, 
Mount Auburn, Mass. 

'93. E. A. Hawks is with the Industrial League, 
preparing to do Christian work among the laboring 
classes. His address is Winchester Park Building, 
Springfield, Mass. 

'94. E. D. White has secured a position as United 
States Railway Postal Clerk. His present address is 
22 Mc Daniel Road, Atlanta, Ga. 

'94. H. P. Smead was at college a few days last 
week. 

'95. Wright A. Root has been appointed superin- 
tendent of the 500 acre farm of A. C. Chase, Man- 
ager of the Syracuse Chilled Plow works. 

'95. Address of H. S. Fairbanks is Box 1486, 
Boston, Mass. 



COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



CHARLES G. AYRES, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

fl®- At Reasonable Prices. .ffiy 



MANUFACTURER OF 



SODA WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston & Maine, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware. Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.20, a. m., 2.34 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. m. 
Sundays 1.30 p. m. 

For Worcester 6.09, 8.20 a. m., 2.34 p. m. Sunday at 
6.10 A. M. 

Returning leave Worcester at 11.15 a. m., 2.25, 5.58 p. m. 

6.09 a. m and 2.34 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.20 A. m., and 2.34 p. m. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 8.01, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.25, 4.45, 5.14, 7.18, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
11.15 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.05, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2.20, 4.20, 6.00, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 a. m., 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., goinS 
south leave Amherst at 8.01. 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.18,8.40 p.m. Sundays, 1 1.16 a. m., 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 a. m., 1.20, 7.18 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the ->. 
south at 6.44 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.05, 11.46 a. m., 8.42 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.22, 
11.00 a. m., 7.15 p. m. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 1 1 to 
1 1-30 a. m. and 2 to 4 p. m. every day except Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Batanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 3 to 
5-30 p. m. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday; on Saturday from 8 a.m. 
to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. M.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. m. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1 p. m. 
and 8 p. m. week-days, and at 7 p. m. on Sundays. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



146 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The Department of 
Tests of the Pope 
Manufacturing Com- 
pany, with its Emery 
Testing Machine of 
100,000 lbs. capacity, 
has no superior, even 
among the Govern- 
ment testing stations. 

Expert Engineers and Metallurgists watch 
everything that enters into Colombia con- 
struction. There are no untried devices in 
the Cokunbia. That is why & & & & J# 




jOitimDia 

■ Standard of the World 



Art Catalogue of 
fifty pages for 
two 2-cent 
stamps. 



POPE MFG. CO. 

e£ £• Hartford, Conn> 



Special Attention Given to Finishing Spreads. 



f n%% r 



# 



AMHERST, 



&1 * 



MASS. 



HASTINGS, 






<*> 



The Photographer from Boston, 



£^^= 



*\3 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



HJRS WU HI EUK OF 1J.O. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 
146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



AIjDAND POOL PARL0E|S. 



X<5 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



John 

13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St., 



arne 



j 



Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 



660 and 



Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Stkeet, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

E. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Ajiherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : 9 A. M. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

STEAM AMD GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



SHEET 

AND 



STRINGS FOB VIOLIN, BANJO AID GOITAR. 



9 ! 
AT 



Cusfimaii's Ausic $fore 1 



NOR THAMl'TON. 



J. P. 

Merchan 



Business Euits, "~\9. 
Custom Pants, $4.5 3 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



SC1SX LURE'S 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. J. SCHILLARG, 

los Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 

COAL AND WOOD. 

THOMAS C. DILLOM, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AMD FREE BURNING COALS 

OP THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



*BILL1D AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



-GO TO- 



1895. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 



FOB THE BEST VVuRK. 



Society, Class and Group fek a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY" PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



E. K, BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



s^^^^z^^^^^^^mi^^^^^^i^mm^mms^^ ^ms^sssm^sss^ ^: ,i:_1:.._~a 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 



Charle 





NORTHAMPTOK. 



FINE CLOTHING 
AND^FURNISHINQS. 



E. & W. COLL ARS & CUFFS. 

FINE NECKWEAR. 



sS 



Buy lie Latest Farm Iflacliei] and Make Money. 

Do yon know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found in the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



-La-ND 1 „tfD v,-_.__ ( ? 

KOLLEF^, 




,. OEEDEfVs 
Write f r 

Circulars 

7^ q I 



1896 Catalogue just out, showing a large collection of 
Farming Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full 
directions for using and planting the same, free on applica- 
tion. 



BOSS B 

162 Front St., 



Worcester, Mass. 



.^INdllEIIEIR.Sar HOUSE 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEUF. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Percheroti Horses ni Siiii Step, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND. PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COOCH I SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. HIEKiNSDN, D. 33. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - - - - - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 
9 to is -a.- 3vi-, 1-30 to 5 t>- ]vt. 



Ether and Nirons Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. M. CHAMBERLAIN, 

Uverv and Feed Stable. 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

E"CJBBEE GOODS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



J])£~ Repairing done while you tea it, ^& 
3 FHCEN1X ROW. 



BOARDING 



Livery, Feed and Exchange Stable 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Barn, 



Amherst, Mass, 



M. N. SPEAK, 

ookselier, stafimr and Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 
HAIR BRBiSIW G ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, SARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

no. 1 cook's block, - - amherst, mass. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calk, responded to at residence, first door 
■west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

^ Co-Operatiye Steam Laundry * 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, O. I«*. PALMIER , &'3'. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing- and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

s-s; satisfaction g-ttair.jvisj'tieieid. £^3= 
Office : 
Next Door West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & C0~ 

Barge lo and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER. 



Kf*-SPECIAL EATES.^©J 



Passenger to center, ------ ioc. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c 

Barge furnished for parties ancl clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Popularity of our Glomes 
iasei 



HE 



A customer once, we can count on as a 
sure customer in the future. Good qual- 
ities, correct styles, perfection of work- 
manship and popular prices are the coax- 
ers. Every sale backed by a guarantee 
as good as gold. 



Clips, Tailors, Hatters, Fnrnlsflers. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACHSOH & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



B. W. BLOUEBTT & CD., 

Merchant Tailors 

AND DEALERS IN 

READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

^•-Repairing neatly clone at short notice..*!^ 



Geo. W. Eladgatt & En. 



BUY YO'JR SUPPLIES OF 



ALLE 



FOUHTAIKT F> J?*®. 
Sevmour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



4-Botany Supplies, Gum Paper, Lenses, Herbarium Slips, ftc.4* 



STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE COKFECTIOKBRY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT IN SEASON. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need of from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's Celebrated 

Gloria can be had at 

Allen Brothers' Great Bargain Emporium. 





VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 22, 



1896. 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

GEORGE DAVISON LEAVENS, '97, Editor-in-Chief. 

JOHN MARSHALL BARRY. '97. Business Manager. 

ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, Jr., '98, As'st Business Manager. 

JOHN ALBERT EMRICH, '97, Notes and Comments. 

CHARLES IGNATIUS GOESSMANN, '97, Exchange. 

CLAYTON FRANKLIN PALMER, '97, College Notes. 

RANDALL DUNCAN WARDEN, '98, Athletics. 

GEORCE HENRY WRIGHT, '98, Alumni Notes. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS, '99, Library Notes. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



With the present issue the management of the 
Life passes into the hands of a new editorial board. 
In assuming charge of the college publication we 
realize that we have no easy task before us. During 
the past year the retiring board has brought the paper 
to a standard of excellence higher than it had previ- 
ously known. To maintain this high standard, to fear- 
lessly speak the truth concerning existing evils in col- 
lege, and to advance the cause of Aggie in the student 
world shall be our earnest endeavor. At the first 
meeting of the Aggie Life board Mr. F. W. Barclay, 
'97, was elected editor-in-chief. Unfortunately he did 
not return to college, and it has been necessary to 
elect another man in his place. Mr. Barclay is a 
man of rare ability and energy, and would have proven 
a most efficient captain for the Life. We are well 
acquainted with the high character of his literary 



work, and his loss is sincerely regretted by the entire 
editorial board. 



Much of a student's success in college depends on 
his training in the preparatory school. There seems 
to be a prevailing ambition among such institutions to 
pose for something other than they really are. They 
often introduce into their curriculum studies belonging 
properly to the college. These branches are treated 
superficially, and are mainly used to give a certain 
amount of false dignity to the catalogue. The results 
of this smattering are seen in every college class. A 
census of the number of students who are deep in 
Greek and psychology and who cannot write presenta- 
ble English or readily solve a simple mathematical 
problem would astonish one who is not familiar with 
the failings of a collegian. The trouble is in the pre- 
paratory training, Students are encouraged to learn a 
little astronomy, a bit of chemistry, how to hammer 
out fossils from the rocks, and a hundred other things 
about which they retain no really solid knowledge. If 
the student when in college tries to study any of these 
subjects seriously, he finds that he must start at the 
beginning, and that all the time spent in school upon 
that subject was wasted except so far as it may have 
encouraged habits of observation. Matthew Arnold 
called us the most common-schooled and the least 
educated people in the world. If that is true, may it 
not be due to the superficial study of an indefinite 
number of branches, to the tendency to regard stu- 
dents as mere machines for the pursuit of courses, 
and to the system of stuffing with facts rather than 
training to think ? 



It is a lamentable fact that while great progress 
has been made in many departments of the college, 
certain matters that concern the welfare of the stu- 
dents most directly and vitally have been neglected. 
We refer particularly to the sanitary arrangements, or 



148 



AGGIE LIFK. 



rather the lack of sanitary arrangements, in the north 
and south dormitories. Taking up first the matter of 
water supply, it might well seem incredible to one not 
familiar with the place that the entire water supply for 
all the students in the Massachusetts State College 
should come from one faucet in the basement of 
south college. This compels students rooming on the 
fourth floor of north college to descend three flights of 
stairs, walk to south college, often through snow or 
slush, and then to descend the stairs of the basement. 
The return trip is equally trying. All this must be 
done to procure water for drinking or for purposes of 
cleanliness. Incredible as it may seem there is not a 
drop of water supplied to north college. One might 
naturally enquire how much better off in that respect 
is this dormitory than are the tenement houses of our 
great cities which have been unanimously condemned 
by the inspecting boards of health. We contend that 
from a standpoint of health alone, not to mention the 
matter of convenience, running water should be sup- 
plied on every floor in all the entries of both dormitory 
buildings. It would also be an extremely prudent 
measure to have a hose coupling at each stairway 
landing, with hose kept connected ready for immediate 
use in case of fire. At all events we hope that the 
authorities who have the matter in charge will see fit 
to supply us with an abundance of such a necessary 
commodity as water. In our next issue we propose to 
make a statement concerning the deplorable condition 
of other sanitary matters here at the M. A. C, in the 
sincere hope that it may result in some changes for 
the better. 



must win to gain confidence. The policy adopted in 
past seasons has been a ruination to success. You 
cannot begin the season with strong teams. You 
must gain your confidence ; winter's stiffness must 
wear off, and, above all, you must play together. This 
is gained in other places in the manner suggested 
above. Why not try it here ? One word about batting. 
They say that a man must have a " good eye " to bat, 
but, after a good eye comes grit and we have noticed 
that it is the " grit part " that is most needed. More- 
over it is amusing to notice that the greater the length 
the more inseparable the coward. If men will stir up 
a little more " grit cake " and carry it up to the plate 
we will see fewer strike outs and more base hits. 



The base-ball season has opened under very favor- 
able auspices. The very early spring, the magnificent 
weather, and the unusual enthusiasm of the men has 
all combined to render a successful an assured possi- 
bility. The candidates are practicing faithfully. The 
ball is being handled clean and sharp. Very few wild 
throws are made and with few exceptions the positions 
are well played. Both the infield and outfield are 
stronger than last year and after a few practice games 
the team should play together, and not as individuals 
playing for records. We would suggest to the manage- 
ment the arrangement of numerous practice games 
with minor teams in the vicinity of Amherst for the 
furtherance of this most important essential. A team 



REVIEW OF THE COLLEGE CA TALOGUE. 
We had intended in this issue to give numerous 
reasons on — Why the catalogues had not appeared; 
but now they have arrived and have been distributed, 
read — at least we hope so —and are now scattered 
throughout the state. 

As a book the report is quite thick and if one reads 
it carefully he will also notice it is deep. This can 
easily be accounted for as it was printed in January 
and has ever since been getting dry. Now it is rather 
uncommon for a deep pond to be dry, yet very often a 
dry book is deep, and we have noticed too that dry 
i books are sometimes thick. 

Less than one-fourth of the book concerns the col- 
lege proper, the remainder being devoted to an appen- 
dix; a tacking on process which seems quite in keeping 
with the policy of the corporation. 

Professor Fernald's monograph on the Crambidae 
of North America is a leading feature of the work and 
cannot receive too high praise ; we do not hesitate to 
pronounce our department of Entomology among the 
strongest in the country. 

Short winter courses in various departments are 

offered. This is a new feature that must prove of 

inestimable value to those having but a limited time 

I at their disposal. Latin has been dropped from the 

entrance requirements, a change that will certainly 

: meet with popular approval ; however, we notice that 

: the Algebra paper is rather stiff but we hope that a 

j lesson has been learned from the experience of past 

years. 

For improving and enlarging the grounds and ex- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



149 



tending the Experiment Station laboratories an appro- 
priation of over $13,000 is asked. Before any more 
money is spent in this direction we should like to see 
something done to better the sanitary condition of the 
college. The sanitary arrangements here are most de- 
plorable, and now that the cows have a new barn, and 
the pigs are well cared for, we had hoped that a small 
amount might be expended in a way benificial to the 
students. 

As a whole the catalogue is a great disappointment. 
The lateness of its publication will preclude its hav- 
ing any considerable influence with young men who are 
preparing to enter college, and, besides it is so diffi- 
cult to pick out from Farm Reports and Experiment 
Station Bulletins the really great opportunities offered 
by the Mass. Agr'l College that we feel justified in 
offering these criticisms. 



A STRIDE TOWARD THE IDEAL COLLEGE 
LIFE. 

It was pleasing to note that, at the beginning of the 
present college year, a majority of the colleges in 
various parts of the country announced, that the new 
class was the largest in the history of the institution. 
This was especially true of the smaller colleges, many 
of which have, during the past five years doubled the 
number of students that were within their walls twenty- 
five years ago. Even considering the attraction that 
a college life presents, aside from and independent of 
those designed for it, it is evident that the thirst for 
knowledge is not diminishing among the young people 
of the land. This is an omen of hope for the future, 
for nothing can contribute more to our progress as a 
nation than a steady growth in the number of our 
educated men. 

There can be no doubt that our colleges are becom- 
ing better equipped each year to fit young men to 
become useful and efficient citizens. The standard 
of admission has been perceptibly raised throughout 
the country, and the teaching corps is not only much 
larger, but covers a wider field of knowledge and 
investigation. The multiplication of special courses 
and the extension of the system of electives, while it 
may give additional facilities for merely " getting 



through college," yet to the student who is earnestly 
striving to gain an education that will be a lasting 
benefit, not only to himself but to the world in general, 
the colleges of to-day certainly offer advantages which 
are far superior to any that have been offered before. 
They are fully justifying what James Bryce said of 
them in the " American Commonwealth " six years 
ago, " Of all the institutions of the country they are 
those which seem to be at this moment making the 
swiftest progress, and to have the brightest promise 
for the future ; they are supplying exactly those things 
which European critics have hitherto found lacking to 
America; and they are contributing to her political as 
well as to her contemplative life elements of inesti- 
mable worth." 

The craze for athletics has not been without its ben- 
eficial effects. It has convinced many people who 
had not given much thought to the matter except to 
think that they were a useless waste of time and often 
harmful as well, that if athletics carried to an extent 
provide these undesirable results, a moderate and 
systematic indulgence in them could not fail to be 
decidedly beneficial. The very fact that there has 
been undue admiration for the leaders in foot ball and 
other sports, has created among undergraduates, a 
desire to be as robust and strong as possible. This 
has led to greater outdoor and other physical exercise 
which certainly benefitted the person indulging. But 
the craze for athletics has undoubtedly reached its 
highest point and must henceforth be on the wane. 
Most of our colleges are now one by one regulating 
the extent to which athletics shall form a part of 
college life, and to what extent they shall be carried 
on with other colleges. Not only this, but they are 
now endeavoring to make them of such a character 
that a greater number of the students shall take part 
in them. 

A president of one of our New England colleges, 
who has succeeded in thus including virtually the 
whole body of students, says that one of the results 
noted of the general participation in athletic exercise 
was a falling off in the annual bills for the breaking of 
windows and other injuries to college property. The 
students must have some way to work off their super- 
fluous energy and if this is not furnished by athletics 
or some such sports, windows and doors would be 
broken and other property injured or destroyed. 



i50 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Again there has been a great decrease in the 
amount of hazing done in our colleges, and this is one 
great benefit of athletics, for those who indulge in this 
more manly sport no longer have any desire for such 
proceedings. It is no longer looked upon as a brave 
thing for a number of students to fall upon the poor 
freshman unawares and subject him to indignities 
which they would not deem worthy of savages under 
other conditions. The faculty and trustees of our 
colleges have for a long time been bitterly opposed to 
any such proceedings but it is only within the last few 
years that the undergraduate body has taken a stand 
against them. 

This more manly spirit is making itself felt to a 
greater and greater extent each year in the field of 
college morality. It is no longer considered an 
accomplishment worthy of college men to get drunk 
or appear tough. Formerly a man who was brilliant 
was expected to be more or less dissipated, and immo- 
rality in such men found its excuse, but now anyone 
who is notoriously immoral is looked down upon as a 
disgrace to his college and soon becomes an outcast 
to the college world. 

Another development of manliness scarcely less 
beneficial in its character is the position taken by the 
students of many colleges in regard to the offence of 
cribbing in examinations. Students have been placed 
entirely upon their honor to see that no false means 
are taken in examinations, by leaving them entirely 
without supervision of any kind while taking the exam- 
inations. Students have fully justified the faith thus 
placed in them and have summarily dealt with those 
few who still persist in the unfair means. 

This development of the spirit of manliness and 
self-control is a great stride toward the ideal of college 
life. Nothing could better fit a man for the trials, 
temptations and burdens of life than the training of 
four years of college life. No parent need fear to 
send his child to institutions where such influences are 
felt. Wealth cannot take the place of this spirit of 
true manliness. If this is to be the test of a student's 
character, the poor boy will stand just as good a show 
as the rich one, and if he can gain the highest place 
he can hold it against all the riches of the world. 

Indeed I do not believe there is a college in the 
country where a poor boy cannot by his talent com- 
mand the respect of riches. The chances for a poor 



boy to work his way through college are just as plenty 
and easy as they ever were. To be sure it may cost 
much more at the present time, but his labor will just 
as surely command a greater return and as much 
greater as the present cost of an education is than 
that of fifty or a hundred years ago. In every college 
the boy who does this is respected, if he has the qual- 
ities which command respect everywhere. It would 
be a pity if this were not true, for it is the glory of the 
American educational system that it places a liberal 
education within the reach of anyone who has the 
ability and pluck to strive for it. What this nation 
needs above all else, is the respect for, and willing- 
ness to profit by the results of human experience in 
the world, and these can only come through education. 
Whenever a college sends a thoroughly equipped mind 
into a community, it dispatches a missionary of this 
gospel, and he begins a work of reformation that never 
stops. With their present facilities and tendencies, 
our colleges are sending out each year a great army 
of men, whose qualifications and character are improv- 
ing steadily with time. So long as this continues to 
be the case, no man need be anxions about the future 
of the Republic. 



There is an old saying that there is honor even 
among thieves. There seems however to be a wide- 
spread opinion that college students are an exception 
to this rule and that their ideas of right and wrong are 
sadly perverted. At examination time especially is 
the average student supposed to be a great sinner. 
How to correct the tendency " to crib " has long been 
a perplexing problem to college authorities. Perhaps 
a satisfactory solution may be found in the method 
recently adopted at Williams. There the students 
and faculty have adopted a constitution establishing 
the honor system in examinations. Williams is the 
second New England college to take this stand. It is 
hoped that others will follow. 



Again — but not for the second, or even the third 
time — we would call the attention of the college 
authorities to the pits in front of the basement win- 
dows on the east side of South College. These are 



AGGIE LIFE. 



151 



dangerous traps, and will some day bring sorrow, 
unless something is done to protect the steps of per- 
sons near their edges. Will you wait until some 
unfortunate person has fallen into one of these pits 
and broken an arm or a leg, or will you provide a 
guard of some kind ? If these cause any accidents, 
who will be blamed? Surely not we. " To be fore- 
warned is to be fore-armed." We hope a wise action 
will soon be taken in regard to this matter, and trust 
that we may have no cause for mentioning it again. 
# 
* # 

During the past few years many experiments have 
been carried on to determine the effect of electric 
light upon the growth of plants. Among those con- 
ducting these experiments, Prof. Bailey of Cornell has 
probably done the most. The practice is to constantly 
supply the plants with light, by applying the arc electric 
lights during the night. This scheme has been quite 
extensively employed by Mr. Rawson at his green- 
houses in Arlington, Mass., with very favorable results. 
With reference to the experiments but recently com- 
pleted at Cornell, Prof. Bailey reports as follows : 

" We are highly gratified with the result. We have 
proved that by using electric light during the daytime 
we can produce lilies fully two weeks before those that 
are grown under natural conditions. The effect is 
fully as marked in the case of lettuce, but we found 
that electricity is a positive detriment to peas." 

" We will still continue our investigations on differ- 
ent plants, and will ascertain the effects on vegetation 
of the Roentgen rays. We shall also experiment on 
plants by electrifying the atmosphere in which they 
are grown." 



The matter of lighting the college grounds by elec- 
tricity furnished from our own plant is a subject that 
has recently attracted the attention of the college 
body. It has met favor with the entire student body 
and already a number of the faculty have expressed a 
pronounced desire for its adoption. In a recent inter- 
view with Mr. Wallace it was found that this lighting 
could be brought about in two ways. One by means 
of the arc light system and the other by the incandes- 
cent system. The arc system would involve an 
expense of $40 per light, with the additional consump- 



tion of six pounds of fuel per hour and necessary car- 
bons, and probably three lights would be needed to 
produce sufficient illumination. By using the incan- 
descent system a " bank" of lights would be required, 
that is, from 60 to 70 twenty-five candle power lamps 
costing from $2 to $3 per lamp. If this system were 
introduced a very beautiful effect could be obtained. 
The college grounds could be lighted perfectly and 
the many dark and almost dangerous places lying 
between the boarding house and South College could 
be done away with. A chain of lights could be run 
from the new bam to the Plant House, and also the 
road from the pines to the chapel could be so lighted 
as to produce an ornamental as well as practical 
effect. The college grounds should be lighted better 
than they are at present and we take this opportunity 
of expressing our ideas in this matter and trust that 
the student body will see it their duty to act together 
and bring this matter to a settlement. It may meet 
v/ith defeat but if so we can say we have performed 
our duty in looking for the advancement and develop- 
ment of our college. 

# 
# # 

Each year of our history records a larger or smaller 
number of new editions of the plays of Shakespeare. Each 
year sees his plots fathomed deeper than ever before. 
More and more each year, our literary students probe 
deeper into the mysteries of his works. Here in our 
own college the members of the Junior class are at 
present engaged in studying the life and works of this 
great master of English. We hope that this article 
may prove interesting not only to this class, but to 
others as well. Not long ago Alphonse Daudet fils, a 
son of the famed novelist, published an interesting 
romance in which he portrays Shakespeare in his 
youth as travelling through the continent where he is 
supposed to have met the characters that afterwards 
appeared in his plays. Emile Faguet writes concern- 
ing this work in the French section of the tri-lingual 
review, Cosmopolis. We give a condensed translation 
of Faguet's article : 

" The author supposes that Shakespeare at the age 
of 22 made a long journey in Holland, Germany and 
Denmark, and that he found in the observations which 
he made in the course of this journey and in the con- 
versations in which he took part, all the material for 



^52 



AGGIE LIFE. 



his great dramatic works. This is William Shakes- 
peare's ' Apprenticeship.' You see the manner of 
proceeding. In place of saying that Shakespeare created 
Othello, Macbeth, etc., he shows us Shakespeare on 
the journey, meeting histories and dramas analogous 
to Othello and Macbeth ; and this is amusing to all 
who are familiar with the works of William Shakes- 
peare. . . . Shakespeare leaves London and 
crosses the North sea in a wretched coasting vessel. 
He experienced a temptest (naturally) and drinks it in 
with eyes and ears like one who relies upon making 
something out of it. He disembarks at Rotterdam 
(there are five pages descriptive of the journey up the 
Meuse in the fog) ; he is present at scenes of anger, 
fury and drunkenness in taverns among beggars roused 
to revolt and vengeance. He sees drawn from the 
canal a loving and despairing woman called Eva, who 
later appears as Ophelia. He discusses dramatic art, 
poetry and painting with artists, critics, pampheteers 
and poets. He crosses Germany, still sad from the 
recent Reformation, and now the serious melancholy 
of northern countries moves him delightfully, now, as 
a reaction, makes him dream of Italy and the bright 
joy of the Renaissance. In spare moments he opens 
his Plutarch. Finally in Denmark, not elsewhere, he 
sees Hamlet, in the person of a poor, wretched and 
disgraced creature who does not return from the uni- 
versity and who has not read ' words, words, words,' in 
books, but who has no need of that to detest the man 
who has married his mother after having very probably 
forced his father prematurely to become an ' old mole.' 
And there you have the education of Shakespeare's 
mind almost complete. 



NOTICE. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, held 
March 14th, '96, it was decided that no student shall 
be paid for work done for any of the departments at a 
time when he is absent from a college exercise 
without excuse. 

C. S. Walker, Secretary. 



The entire property of the universities and colleges 
of the United States is valued at $200,000,000 ; one 
fourth of this belongs to four universities, 



In Memory of 
CHARLES A. KING 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Deceased. 



97. 



Whereas: It has pleased the Allwise Father to remove 
from our midst our beloved friend and brother, Charles A. 
King and 

Whereas: Recognizing his many virtues and his manly 
qualities, therefore, be it 

Resolved: That we, the active members of the Amherst 
chapter of the Q. T. V. Fraternity, deeply feeling our loss, 
do extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family in 
their affliction and be it further 

Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
family of our departed brother, and that copies be placed on 
file in the Chapter Records, and be published in the College 
and Fraternity publications. 

W. B. Harper, } Committee 
E. W. Capen, > for the 
D. A. Beaman, ) Chapter. 



(olleg? |M©if$. 



— Spring term opened Thursday, April 2nd. 

— A. M. Kramer '96, has joined the D. G. K. 
fraternity. 

— W. E. Chapin, '99, has returned to his home for 
a few days. 

— The first division of the Freshman Latin class is 
studying Ovid. 

— The Freshman class has voted to give the Jun- 
iors a banquet. 

— The championship of the chess tournament was 
won by Baxter, '98. 

— C. E. Stacy, '99, has left College for a few days 
on account of illness. 

— Pres't Harris of Maine State College visited this 
institution, April 7th. 

— Several men have been added to the Boston 
competitive drill squad. 

— S. E. Smith, '99, who has been very ill with pneu- 
monia, is slowly improving. 

— The Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity was photo- 
graphed by Lovell on April 1 1th. 

— Pres't H. H. Goodell was away the greater part 
of last week on a business trip to Washington, 

— Rev. Samuel J. Austin of Darien, Conn., will 
preach in the College chapel on Sunday, April 26. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



J 53 



— David Wentzell, farmer for the Experiment sta- 
tion for about a dozen years, has resigned his position. 

— The ball game that was scheduled for Saturday, 
April 18, upon the campus, was postponed until Sat- 
urday, April 25. 

— Prof. W. P. Brooks has been granted a leave of 
absence from his duties here for one year, for the 
purpose of studying abroad. 

— The Junior appears to have found his hobby in 
the use of the net. The Freshman enjoys the com- 
panionship of the botany-can. 

— Ninety-nine has several prospective games ar- 
ranged for the season and judging from their practice, 
we believe they merit success. 

— T. H. Charmbury, '98, who was seriously ill with 
appendicitis has been operated upon, and his friends 
will be glad to hear that he is slowly recovering. 

— Dr. J. B. Lindsey of the Experiment station, de- 
livered a lecture on "Plant Foods" before a union 
meeting of the Berkshire and Housatonic Agricultural 
societies at Lee, on March 26. 

— The class of Ninety-six has elected the following 
officers for the term: Pres't, J. L. Marshall; vice- 
pres't, H. C. Burrington ; sec'y, W. B. Harper; 
treas., H. T. Edwards; sergeant-at-arms, F. H. 
Read. 

— The town has decided to introduce two more arc 
lights, both of which are to be put up near the College 
grounds. One is to be located near Mr. Wentzell's 
house, and the other at the fork of the road near Mr. 
Gilbert's. 

— The Sophomore class has elected the following 
officers for the term, Pres't, G.H.Wright; vice- 
pres't, J. P. Nickerson ; sec'y and treas., R. D. War- 
den ; reading-room dir. , J. S. Eaton ; base-ball dir., 
R. D. Warden ; tennis dir., J. S. Eaton. 

— On Easter Sunday at our chapel, there were no 
flowers or other decorations, no Easter music, and the 
exercises were not appropriate for the day. There 
were thirty-six students present to enjoy this ; we hope 
they were rewarded for their attendance. 

— Prof. F. S. Cooley, who has been superintendent 
of the College farm for the past three or four years, 
tendered his resignation on April 1st. Mr. E. A. 
Jones, M. A. C„ '84, has been appointed to fill the 
vacancy. 



— At a mass meeting held Wednesday, April 15, the 
sum of $200 was raised to support the base-ball team 
for the coming season. Outside subscriptions have 
since increased this sum considerably. 

— At a meeting of the Glee Club held on Thursday, 
April 9th, it was voted to accept the resignation of Mr. 
F. E. DeLuce as leader. Mr. J. A. Emrich, '97 was 
elected in his place, with Mr. G. D. Leavens, '97, as 
assistant. 

— Students and Alumni of the College may obtain 
tickets for the Tech-Brown-Harvard-Aggie Drill and 
Dance to be held in Mechanics Hall, Boston, Friday, 
May 15, 1896, of the Cadet Adjutant, F. E. DeLuce. 
Price of tickets entitling holder to a seat in the sec- 
tion reserved for Aggie men, fifty cents. Alumni 
must enclose stamp for reply. 

— The revival meetings held at the Methodist 
church in the town for about a week after College 
opened, were well attended. Many students were at- 
tracted from this College, and we believe much good 
has resulted to them, of well as to many others that 
attended them. 

— The bill presented by T. F. Keenan of Boston to 
the Legislature a short time ago, and providing for the 
establishment by the city of Boston of twenty-five 
scholarships yearly, at $300 each for the benefit of 
the young men of that city who wished to enter M. A. 
C, has been defeated. 

— It is rumored that the College is about to build a 
power station. If this be true, — and we hope it is, — 
we trust that in the near future, our grounds will be 
well lighted up. We have seen the need of this for a 
long time, and especially of the necessity of having 
the path leading to the boarding house lighted during 
the winter months at least. 

— Prof. R. E. Smith has offered a valuable book 
on wild flowers to be awarded to the member of the 
Freshman class submitting the best herbarium at the 
end of the term. This is a good thing to promote in- 
terest and competition, and we hope the results will be 
gratifying, not only to the winner of the prize, but to 
the Professor as well. 

— In most College dormitories where electricity fur- 
nishes the lighting element, it is the custom of the 
manager in charge of the station to "flash" the lights 



154 



AGGIE LIFE. 



perceptibly twice about ten minutes before they are to 
be turned out. This is a great accommodation to 
those who are given to the habit of retiring early (?) 
and it has been suggested that this be done at the 
M. A. C. station. It would be thankfully received and 
fully appreciated. 

— The two years' class '96 has elected the follow- 
ing officers for the term : Pres't, E. W. Capen ; vice 
pres't, J. A. Davis; sec'y, R. P. Coleman; treas., 
H. P. Dickinson ; sergeant-at-arms, Williams Eaton; 
class captain, F. E. Barrett ; athletic dir., L. R. Alex- 
ander ; baseball dir., E. W. Capen. 

— At a mass meeting of the M. A. C. boarding 
club held at the close of last term, the following offi- 
cers were elected ; Pres't and manager, R. D. War- 
den ; vice pres't, W. L. Pentecost ; sec. and treas. 
J. L. Marshall ; 4th dir., J. L. Bartlett ; 5th dir., G. H. 
Wright ; 6th dir., J. C. Burrington ; 7th dir., M. H. 
Pingree. Mr. P. A. Leamy, who has served in the 
capacity of manager for quite a while, was re-elected, 
but refused to serve any longer. 

— For the first time since the founding of this in- 
stitution, the Senior class has adopted the cap and 
gown. The class made its first appearance in this 
new costume Sunday, April 12 ; and those who were 
present at chapel cannot deny but that the cap and 
gown were quite becoming. This is one of many cus- 
toms observed in colleges, and one that will admit 
little criticism until it has at least had a fair trial. 
Like all other new things, it receives its share of com- 
ments, but we think a step has been taken towards 
establishing this as a custom at M. A. C. 

— There has just been issued by the Department of 
Agriculture a publication entitled "Arbor Day: Its 
History and Observance," compiled by Dr. N. H. 
Egleston under the direction of Dr. Dabney. This 
book contains a great deal of useful information con- 
cerning the value of trees and shrubs, a full account 
of the origin and history of Arbor Day, together with 
helpful suggestions for observing this day in an appro- 
priate manner. The book is largely composed of ad- 
dresses by prominent men, and is a valuable addition 
to the library of any student. To those who would 
like copies of this book, the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture will, on application mail them 
free, 



— The following are the recent promotions made in 
the battalion by Lieut. Dickinson : 

To be Cadet Captain Cadet 1st Lieut. Kinney. 
1st Serg't " private Kramer. 
" Serg't " " Sellew. 

Jones. 
Sastre. 
Cook. 
" " " Shepard. 

" Corporal " " Tsuda. 

" " " " Saito. 

Nutting. 

Moore. 

Roper. 

— The attention of the students is called to the 
fact that some of the men rooming in the College 
dormitories, have put up extra lights, by tapping the 
main wires at the ceiling. This makes poor 
connections. Mr. Wallace, who has charge of the 
electrical plant at the College, informs us that this is 
a very dangerous practice, and if the insurance com- 
panies knew of it, no insurance could be obtained on 
the dormitories. Students who obtain permission to 
have an extra light should consult Mr. Wallace before 
putting it up. He will put up the light free and will 
furnish the materials at cost, which is about one half 
of what we are now paying. The cost of an extra 
lamp is 14 cents per week. 

— The free delivery mail service of Amherst, was 
put into effect for the first time on Monday, April 6th. 
Since then, a considerable degree of dissatisfaction 
has been expressed by the students at M. A. C. By 
this new method, the mail is brought to us twice a 
day ; at 1 1 o'clock a. m., and at 4 o'clock p. m. The 
mail is collected four times a day and no fault can be 
found with this part of the service; the comments 
arise from the way the mail is delivered. It arrives at 
Amherst between the afternoon trip of the carrier.and the 
last evening mail, and the students, as a rule, do not get 
this mail until after 1 o'clock the next day. We have 
become accustomed to our evening mail, and it is 
certainly unfortunate to be obliged to wait so long for 
it. We hope that something may be done to render 
this service more accommodating and consistent. 

— The prize military drill took place Thursday, 
March 12 in the drill hall. Though the weather was 



AGGIE LIFE. 



!55 



stormy the gallery was filled with spectators. About 
40 cadets entered into co mpetition for the two prizes, 
the first of which was a beautiful gold medal offered 
by Mr. I. C. Greene, of the class of '94, and the sec- 
ond, was a fine military uniform offered by Mr. Glynn 
of Amherst. Capt.Pettitt, instructor of cadets at Yale, 
acted as judge. The cadets were divided into squads 
of ten men each. Each squad was drilled down until 
two cadets remained, — the Captain's judgment being 
rendered on actual mistakes. The final squad cer- 
tainly did justice to the military department. On the 
completion of several of the most difficult manoeuvers 
in the manual of firings, loud applause rang from 
the gallery. C.A.Peters, '97, won the first prize, 
and A. Montgomery, '98, won the second. The win- 
ners were borne from the hall on the shoulders of their 
classmates, and "set ups" were in order. 

— At a business meeting of the Natural History So- 
ciety held April 10th, the following officers were 
elected for the coming year : President, P. H. 
Smith; vice-president, C. A. Peters; secretary 
and treasurer, F. H. Turner ; directors; G. 
D. Leavens, C. I. Goessmann, L. F. Clark, R. D. 
Warden, S. E. Smith, and E. M. Wright. We feel 
that the retiring officers have worked faithfully during 
the past year and we can see wherein the meetings 
have been of great benefit to us. Several papers 
have been presented before the society by both pro- 
fessors and students, and we feel greatly indebted to 
those who have helped to make our meetings inter- 
esting and instructive. The Natural History Society 
has certainly been a success during the past year, and 
we hope that in the years to come it will accomplish 
equally good results. But in order to keep up the 
high standard of the society, it is necessary that every 
member should feel it his duty to do what he can and 
-especially to be present at the meetings. 

— Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham has been 
appointed by Lieut. Gov. Wolcott to occupy the va- 
cancy left by the resignation of Francis H. Appleton 
from the Board of Trustees of this College. Mr. Ap- 
pleton has been a very active worker in behalf of the 
interests of the College for many years, and his resig- 
nation was accepted with much regret. But in the 
person of Mr. Bowditch the Board has a very capa- 
ble man, and one who will reflect much credit upon 
his new duties as trustee. 



— The '99 class officers for the summer term are 
as follows : Pres't, F. H. Turner; vice pres't, J. R. 
Dutcher ; sec'y, C. M. Walker ; treas., W. A. Hook- 
er ; sergeant-at-arms, M. H. Pingree ; class captain, 
H. D. Holt ; reading-room dir.,J. R. Dutcher ; base- 
ball ball dir., W. E.Hinds. 

— Ninety-seven has elected the following officers 
for the term: Pres't, G. D. Leavans; vice-pres't. C. I. 
Goessmann ; sec'y, L. F. Clark; treas., P. H. Smith ; 
class captain, C. A. Peters ; baseball capt., J. A. 
Emrich ; reading-room directors, L. F. Clark and J. 
M. Barry ; tennis directors, C. A. Peters, and J. A. 
Emrich. 

The new catalogue has at last appeared, and we are 
glad to note that Latin has been dropped from the 
requirements for admission and has been made elec- 
tive in the Senior year. For a long time the Life has 
contended that in colleges of the nature of ours Latin 
should not be an important feature, and above all that 
it should not be required for entrance. Very few pre- 
paratory schools give the Latin and English prepara- 
tion necessary under the old system, and this fact has 
prevented many men from entering. In view of the 
fact that this stumbling block has been removed, it is 
safe to assume that the class of 1900 will be an 
unusually large one. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



Handbook of Arctic Discoveries. By Gen. A. W. 
Greeley. This book contains in a concise form the 
history of polar discoveries. It has been compiled 
from the records of different editions and gives a 
short but complete account of polar exploration since 
the time of the search for a northwest passage. 

A Primer of the History of Mathematics. By W. 
W. Rouse Ball. In this work the history of mathe- 
matics is briefly outlined from the schools of the 
Ionian Greeks up to recent times. This book is 
designed for those who have not the time to read 
larger works and for students who wish to obtain a 
brief history of this science. 

The Science of Nutrition. By Edward Atkinson. 
This book deals with the scientific preparation of food. 
The author is the inventor of the Alladin oven which 
is so constructed as to hold and regulate the heat. 
This is a great improvement over the cooking ranges 
now used as all the heat is utilized for cooking instead 
of passing off through the chimney and into the room. 
The book contains also tables of the nutritive value of 
different articles of food and the composition of food 
materials, besides a large number of recipes. 



156 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The Board of Editors desire to thank E. B. Smead, 
71, and J. F. Winchester, 75, each of whom have 
given five dollars to help the financial side of Aggie 
Life. It is highly encouraging to receive such sub- 
stantial aid from these loyal graduates. The Life 
would be better off if more of the alumni would show 
such loyalty or at least pay their subscription taxes. 

'81. — E. D. Howe, Master of the State Grange, 
visited college near the close of the winter term. 

'84. — E. A. Jones has secured the position of 
superintendent of the college farm. 

'91. — Frank L. Arnold, married to Miss Edith 
Parents, April 16. After spending their honeymoon 
in Providence, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold will settle in Am- 
herst. 

'94. — Charles H. Higgins, Veterinary Dept. Magill 
University, Montreal. In a competitive Thesis in the 
Pathological Department the prize was divided be- 
tween Mr. Higgins and a student in the Medical 
Department. This reflects great credit on Mr. Hig- 
gins, as the student of Medicine had received a year's 
more training than had the student of Veterinary. 

'95. — Address of Wright A. Root is South Ononda- 
ga, N. Y. 

'95.— M. J. Sullivan is in the employ of Mr. J. J. 
Glessner of the firm Warder, Bushnell, Glessner and 
Co., manufacturers of Binders, Mowers and Reapers. 
Address Littleton, N. H., care A. J. Williamson. 

Ex-'97. — Chas. A. Ranlett is now at West Point 
Academy. 

The following " Alumni Statistics," although re- 
ceived sometime ago, could not be published before 
this issue on account of the large amount of matter 
on hand. The list shows at a glance how the gradu- 
ates are distributed all over the world, and if their 
professions were given they would convey some idea 
of the broad education which the institution furnishes. 



SOME ALUMNI STATISTICS. 
The following information, compiled from the '97 
Index gives some interesting information concerning 
the location of the graduates of the Massachusetts 



Agricultural College. It is assumed that this Index 
directory is fairly accurate.as it is also the most recent 
published. 

Grouping the graduates in the different states, 
territories and countries, we find them located as 
follows : 



Jraduates in Different States and 


Countries. 


Alabama, 


1 




California, 


8 




Colorado, 


3 




Connecticut, 


22 




Delaware, 


1 




District of Columbia, 


4 




Georgia, 


3 




Illinois, 


14 




Indiana, 


3 




Kentucky, 


1 




Maine, 


3 




Maryland, 


1 




Massachusetts, 


236 




Michigan, 


2 




Minnesota, 


5 




Missouri, 


4 




Montana, 


5 




Nebraska, 


4 




Nevada, 


1 




New Hampshire, 


5 




New Jersey, 


9 




New York, 


26 




North Carolina, 


1 




Ohio, 


5 




Oregon, 


2 




Pennsylvania, 


11 




Rhode Island, 


8 




South Dakota, 


1 




Tennesseee, 


1 




Texas, 


1 




Utah, 


1 




Vermont, 


4 




Virginia, 


2 




Washington, 


2 




Wisconsin. 


2 




Wyoming, 


1 


p 


Total in United States, 


403 




South Africa, 


2 




Canada, 


2 




Germany, 


2 




Japan, 


2 




Brazil, 


6 




Cuba, 


1 




Addresses unknown, 


8 




Total, 


426 




Died, 


17 





Total number graduates, 443 



B 



CHARLES AUSTIN KING. 

On Thursday morning the college was called upon 
to mourn the loss of one of its most honored and 
respected members, in the death of Charles Austin 
King of the class of Ninety-Seven. 

His loss will be deeply felt as he was a man of ex- 
emplary character, a faithful as well as a brilliant stu- 
dent and an earnest Christian. He was prominent 
both in his class and in the college, being one of the 
six chosen from the Junior class to compete for the 
Flint oratorical prize at Commencement, a member 
of the Q. T. V. Fraternity, a member of the '97 Index 
Board, an editor of the college paper, and the ranking 
1st Sergeant of the battalion. He was never found 
wanting when needed on the athletic field ; he never 
failed to perform a duty however unpleasant, but 
always "did with his might what his hands found to do." 

In his death his class lose a faithful, loyal comrade 
and the college loses one who if he had lived would 
have been an honor to it. 

Brief funeral services were held in the college 
chapel on Thursday afternoon at two o'clock and were 
attended by the faculty and students in a body. Early 
Friday morning his remains were escorted to the train 
by the battalion, and were then conveyed to his home 
in East Taunton by the escort from his class. 

The funeral services at East Taunton were held in 
the East Taunton Congregational church and were 
largely attended by his friends and former classmates. 
Professor Mills paid a beautiful tribute to our beloved 
friend, and in behalf of the college extended its sympa- 
thy to the bereaved family. After the services at the 
church his body was escorted to its final resting place 
by his sorrowing classmates who paid their final mark 
of respect to his memory by firing a salute over his 
grave. 

"Sunset and evening star, 

And one clear call for me I 
And may there be no moaning of the bar 

When I put out to sea. 

Twilight and evening bell, 

And after that the dark ! 
And may there be no sadness of farewell 

When 1 embark. 

For tho' from out our bourn of Time and Place 

The flood may bear me far, 
1 hope to see my Pilot face to face 

When I have crossed the bar." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



157 



Of these 426 living graduates, at least one half of 
them are residing in Massachusetts, while none are 
located so far as is known in Arizona, Arkansas, North 
Dakota, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, New 
Mexico, South Carolina and West Virginia. Of the 
states having the greatest number of graduates next 
to Massachusetts, New York has 26, Connecticut 22, 
Illinois 14 and Pennsylvania 11. Of the New York 
and Illinois graduates, the following numbers are given 
as located in the two largest cities of each state : 

New York, 16 

Chicago, 10 

Of the 426 living graduates, 130 are engaged in 
farming or some class of work intimately associated 
with it, such as seed growing, directing experiment 
stations or editing agricultural journals. No doubt 
others are engaged in agricultural work whose occu- 
pations are not given in this Index. I have not in- 
cluded experiment station chemists, veterinarians and 
others in this list of 130, but only those devoting their 
attention primarily to agricultural work. Of the 130 
names, I note 84 located in Massachusetts, or 35 per 
cent of the graduates in Massachusetts having direct 
agricultural interests. 

One thought strikes me in connection with this list. 
There are enough graduates in Connecticut and Rhode 
Island (30) to organize a good alumni association for 
those two states. These with former students at the 
college, non-graduates, ought to organize a Connecti- 
cut-Rhode Island Association and do good work for 
their Alma Mater. These are such little states that 
the expense of yearly meetings, so far as traveling ex- 
penses go, would be light. 

The college has a total of 278 graduates in New 
England, besides former students and the present 
under graduates. It would seem eminently fitting for 
these men to make a special effort to make the 
merits of the college better known among the people 
and take an active part in securing an increased at- 
tendance at the institution in future. I believe such a 
course would be justified in the superior inducements 
offered farmers' sons by the college. 

C. S. Plumb, '82. 



The Yale baseball management has arranged for a 
game in May with nine prominent graduate players, as 
a method of coaching. 



R. R. TIME TABLE. 
Boston & MAiNt, Southern Division. 

Trains leave Amherst going East for Ware. Oakdale, South 
Sudbury and Boston at 6.09, 8.16, a. m., 2.31 p. m., Sundays 
6.10. 

Returning leave Boston at 8.45 a. m., 1.30, 4.00 p. M. 
Sundays 1.30 p. M. 

For Worcester 6.09. 8.16 a. m., 2.31 p. m. Sundays at 
6.10 a. m. 

Returning leave Worcester at 9.15 A. m., 2.25, 4.58 p. m. 

6.09 A. M and 2.31 p. m. connect at Ware with north bound 
trains on the Ware River Branch of the B. &. A. and the 6.09, 
8.16 A. M., and 2.31 p. M. connect with south bound trains on 
the same road. 

Trains leave Amherst going West to Northampton at 7.55, 
10.30, a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 4.45, 5.14, 7.30, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 
10.45 a. m.. 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Returning leave Northampton at 5.55, 8.00, 8,50 a. m., 
12.30, 2. 15, 4.20, 6. 10, 8.20 p. m. Sundays, 5.55, 10.20 A. m„ 
7.35 p. m. 

Trains connecting with the Conneticut River R. R., going 
south leave Amherst at 7.55. 10.30 a. m., 12.05, 1.20, 5.45, 
5.14, 7.30, 8.40 p. m. Sundays, 10.55 a. m., 5.19, 8.30 p. m. 

Trains connecting with Connecticut River R. R., going 
north leave Amherst at 10.30 A. M., 1.20, 7.30 p. m. 
New London Northern. 

Trains leave Amherst for New London, Palmer and the 
south at 7.05 a. m., 12.13, 5.57 p. m. 

For Brattleboro and the north at 9.08, 1 1 .46 a. m., 8.06 p. m. 

Trains leave Palmer for Amherst and the north at 8.20, 
11.00 a. m., 7.10 p. M. 

Trains going south connect at Palmer with B. &. A., trains 
for the east and west. 

North bound trains connect with Fitchburg R. R. for the 
east and west. 



NOTICES. 

The President will be at his office at the Library from 2 to 
4 p. m. every day except Saturday and Sunday. 

The Treasurer will be at his office at the Botanic Museum 
from 4 to 5-30 p. M. on Wednesdays, and on Saturdays from 
3 to 5-30 p. M. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of books 
from 2 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. every day in the 
week except Saturday and Sunday ; on Saturday from 8 a. m. 
to 12 M., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 to 8 p. m.; on 
Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m., for reference only. 

Amherst College Library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 P. M. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the Holidays. M. A. C. students may obtain the privilege of 
using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 7-15 and 
1 1 A. M. and 4 and 6-15 p. m. 

The zoological museum will be open on Wednesdays, Fri- 
days and Saturdays from 2 to 4 p. m. 



158 



AGGIE LIFE. 



! 



The New York Journal recently of- 
fered ten bicycles to the ten winners 
in a guessing contest, leaving the 
choice of machine to each. 



ALL CHOSE 




bia 



Nine immediately ? and 
one after he had looked 
at others. The Journal 
therefore bought TEN 
Columbias at |J00 each. 

On even terms a Columbia will be chosen 

TEN times out of TEN. 

POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 
1896 Art Catalogue for two 2-cent stamps. 



, r ( 



3g" 



• PRINT 

AMHERST, 



MASS. 



f^Wjp H 






&M>tjJd^ 



The PhotograDher from Boston 



v ■ -; 



=w^ 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



UL 



, fsi.n.u. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 

146 Trcmont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Dnnr Da 



ILLIAFjDAND M pUf 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St., 



-™ " " " ^-^ " " 3 

Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Idvew, peed and Boafdliig Sfe 



Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Street, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class anil Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. Jo SCHILLAHE, 

10S Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL AND WOOD. 

THOMAS C. DILLOH, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 






ILL1ARD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



■GO TO - 



1895. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STODIG 



FOR THE BEST WORK. 



Society, Class and Group IQofi a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



E. R, B 



ETT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



C. S. GAT-Etr, D. D. S. 

E. N. BKOWX, D. I). S. 



JTZ 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 
STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



a large stock of 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 

HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



AND 



US m VIOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAR. 



AT 



XOR TUA.MPTON. 



a y a 



;ampion, 



o 



Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 






NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 
AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLLARS & CUFFS. 



FINE NECKWEAR. 



tfiiifSSS£!2KX;i;,£3SK3I 



:.,.:■;. ■:::-:-..-.. ., ■ - ' 



Buy the Latest Farm 



and late Money. 



Do you know we keep the largest assortment of Farm- 
ing Tools, Grass and Garden Seeds to be found iu the 
state, and can furnish same at wholesale or retail. We 
have a complete stock of spraying utensils, Paris Green, 
Hellibore, Bordeaux Mixture in liquid or dry form. 



|UPER10R, 

-L.A-ND 

K 0LLE ^ 








Write f or 

Circulars 



1896 Catalogue just out, showiug a large collection of 
Farming Tools, and large list of Choice Seeds, with full 
directions for using and planting the same, free on applica- 
tion. 



Worcester, Mass. 



162 Front St., 



AMHEBST KOTJSE 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEUF. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Perchsron Horses and Soiitiii Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.09 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 
For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. H. BICKJHBQ] 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 

S TO 12 -^. I^C., l-SO TO 5 F. Is/E. 



Ether and Nirons Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



G. M. CHAMBERLAIN, 



OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE. 



PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ETJEBEE O-OOIDS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



I£ts~ Repairing done ivhile you -wait.^&r 



» PBCENJX ROW. 



BOARDING 



manse siaDie 



Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Harrif 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 

ooksdler, stationer aid Newsdealer. 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 

SECOND-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 



RAZORS HONED, BARBERS SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amhekst, Mass. 



^^-A.^a^-A-CIST. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, PISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call.; responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



SF 



iai 






and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agemt, C T&» !E=AX-r MER 'S>-3'. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

r&3ATISFACTION O-TJ^AuE.x^.lSrTElBra. US' 

Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 



DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDER 

£@=»SPECIAL RATES.,,®? 
Passenger to center, ------ ioc. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - - - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



AGGIE LIFE, 



BUY TOUR SUPPLIES OP 



ALLEN BROTHER! 



FOUB'TAIM PENS. 

Sevmour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 



HERBARIUM SLIPS, &c. 

STATIONERY, PAFEE., 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CTIOI6E CONFECTIONERY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need 

ol from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's 

Celebrated Gloria can be had at 









Bureau of Academic Costume. 



COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

3 Intercollegiate makers of Caps, Gowns and 
Hoods. 

Manual, samples, &c, upon request. 



Students and Alumni wi&hing to ob- 
tain back numbers of Aggie Life may 
get them by addressing 

JOHN MAESHAL BAKRY, 

Life, 

fe. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACKSON & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERfflO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



B. W. BLQSBBTT & CO., 



AND DEALERS IN 

READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth §5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

g@="Repairing neatly done at short notice.^JgiS 



rso. Hf. Bladgett 5s Oa. 



Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Books, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



CHARLES G. AYRES, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE TEAMS 

^®»At Reasonable Prices. ■Str 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



AGGIE LIFE 



VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 6, 



1896. 



NO. 



14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

GEORGE DAVISON LEAVENS, "97, Editor-in-Chief. 

JOHN MARSHALL BARRY, '97, Business Manager. 

ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY. Jr., '98, As'st Business Manager. 

CLAYTON FRANKLIN PALMER, '97, College Notes. 

CHARLES IGNATIUS GOESSMANN. '97, Notes and Comments. 

JOHN ALBERT EMRICH, '97. Exchange. 

RANDALL DUNCAN WARDEN, '98, Athletics. 

GEORCE HENRY WRIGHT, '98, Alumni Notes. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS. '99, Library Notes. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER, '99. 



Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



'lais. 



On Saturday morning, April 11th, a notice was 
issued calling for competitive articles for positions 
on the editorial board of the Life. There were 
two vacancies to be filled, one from the class of '97, 
and one from the class of '99. Upon the death of 
Mr. King, April 16th, the second vacancy from the 
class of '97 was created, and on the following day two 
men were chosen from this class to complete the list 
of '97 editors. The representative from the class of 
'99 was elected at a special meeting held on April 
30th. Now that the board is complete , we hope that 
we shall be able to maintain a high standard for the 
Life, and trust that we shall be more prompt with 
future issues than it was possible for us to be with the 
first. 



The time is fast approaching when the members of 
the junior class must decide what branches they shall 
select for senior electives. This decision is an 
extremely important matter, and should be given 
much thoughtful consideration by every student con- 
cerned. In making this choice do not be guided too 
much by the advice or opinions of others. No man 
knows your individual needs so well as you do yourself, 
and consequently no other person's opinion should be 
given undue weight. Beware of taking what you 
think will prove a " snap course." To an earnest 
student there is no such thing as a snap course, and 
those who attempt it are sure to come to grief. Do 
not allow yourself to be influenced to take work in 
which you have no real interest because you believe 
that such studies will lead to more immediate finan- 
cial remuneration. He is indeed an unworthy student 
who would sell his ambition. Choose those subjects 
in which you are most deeply interested and for which 
you have the greatest natural ability. Then the heart 
will be in the work, and success will be assured. 
Choose such branches as shall prove practical and 
useful to you, and such as shall help you most in your 
life work. Above all, choose those studies that shall 
be elevating and broadening in their results. Let your 
work be of the sort that shall lead to symmetrical 
development, and that shall cause you to feel that you 
are a better and nobler man for having accomplished it. 



The subject of military drill in the public schools 
has recently been discussed with some warmth in 
Boston. Those who are opposed to the teaching of 
military tactics and to the drill, contend that its phys- 
ical effect is to make the boys round-shouldered and 
one-sided ; while its mental effect is to make them 
vain, conceited, and blase. Such arguments may 
well appear ridiculous to us who have only to look at 
our own excellent battalion to see their falsity. We 



1 66 



A.GQIE LIFE, 



believe that the military training here combines more 
advantages than can be found in any other department. 
The first duty of a soldier is obedience. The young 
soldier is taught to be faithful to his duties, and to 
respect those in authority. Another benefit of mili- 
tary training is that it teaches punctuality. Five min- 
utes late will never do for a soldier. The drill is a 
most beneficial form of exercise, in that it requires 
quickness of thought and of action, as well as mere 
exertion of the muscles. Cadets learn to be neat in 
their personal appearance, and acquire a good carriage 
and a soldierly bearing. The most valuable effect of 
military drill is to encourage patriotism and American- 
ism. Young men are taught to honor their country's 
flag, and to be ready to defend their native land in 
time of need. As Col. Paget, of Boston, well said, 
" If you want arbitration you must spread a knowledge 
of military tactics, for no country can be influential in 
procuring peace unless it is strong enough to dictate 
peace by force of arms. Any one who scoffs at mili- 
tary drill is the enemy of his country, although he 
may be so unconsciously." 



We feel sure that considerable interest will be felt 
here at our college in the work of the commission 
recently appointed to investigate the matter of pre- 
serving the nation's forests. The commission was 
appointed by the National Academy of Sciences, in 
response to a request from Secretary of the Interior 
Smith ; and the men selected for this work are admir- 
ably qualified to perform it. They are Professor 
Charles S. Sargent, Director of the Arnold Arboretum ; 
Mr, Alexander Agassiz, formerly curator of the 
Natural History Museum at Harvard; General Henry 
L. Abbot, of the Army Engineer Corps, retired, our 
leading authority on rivers; Professor William H. 
Brewer, the eminent Yale botanist and agriculuralist ; 
Mr. Arnold Hague, of the United States Geological 
Survey, and Mr. Gifford Pinchot, who is in charge of 
the great undertaking in practical forestry which Mr. 
George Vanderbilt is conducting on his Southern 
estate. Those who know what these men have 
accomplished in their various fields of activity can 
realize the advantage that may be derived from their 
cooperation in the inquiry that Secretary Smith 
instituted. The objects of the commission are to 
determine whether it is desirable and practicable 



to preserve from fire and to maintain permanently as 
forested lands those portions of the public domain 
now bearing wood growth for the supply of timber ; 
how far the influence of forests upon climatic soil and 
water conditions makes a policy of forest conservation 
desirable in sections of the country where the public 
domain is principally situated ; and what special legis- 
lation should be enacted to remedy the evils now 
existing. The commission will probably recommend 
the adoption of a national policy of protecting the 
wooded domain of the United States ; and they will 
doubtless report in favor of practical legislation. We 
are all aware of the waste of the forest wealth of the 
nation, and all realize that we are already suffering 
from conditions that are sure to grow worse so long as 
they are neglected. Our people are beginning to 
realize the magnitude of the sacrifice which they have 
encouraged and the disaster they have brought upon 
themselves. It is hoped that the report of this com- 
mission of experts will help to interest all intelligent 
citizens in the matter of forest preservation, and that 
it may bring about the adoption of a wise forest policy. 



AN APPEAL FOR HELP. 

TO THE STUDENTS, FACULTY, ALUMNI, AND ALL ERIENDS 
OF THE M. A. C. 

When the present board of editors assumed charge 
of the Life, we found it incumbered with a large debt, 
the greater portion of which was covered by unpaid 
subscriptions. Circular letters were sent to all those 
who were remiss in this matter with results that could 
hardly be termed satisfactory. There were a few 
who kindly sent us generous donations, and to these 
gentlemen we extend our sincere thanks. Others 
promptly paid the amounts that they owed the paper, 
and we appreciate this prompt action very much. Yet 
from all sources we have been able to collect only 
one hundred dollars. We are still three hnndred 
dollars in debt. Of this amount two hundred and 
twenty-five dollars is covered by unpaid subscriptions 
that we find it impossible to collect, and is conse- 
quently a dead loss. 

So great is our indebtedness that our credit is no- 
longer good, and the members of the editorial board 
have been obliged to assume personally the responsi- 
bility for each issue of the paper, which costs thirty- 
five dollars every two weeks. We feel that we can 



AGGIE LIFE. 



161 



no longer afford to do this, though we sincerely hope 
that we may be able to find some way out of the pres- 
ent difficulty without being compelled to suspend the 
publication of the paper. 

Having made a plain statement of the present 
financial condition of the Life, we appeal to the stu- 
dents, faculty, alumni, and all friends of the college 
for substantial aid in this our time of need. The 
Life is the only college paper that we have, and 
while we acknowledge its defects and imperfections, 
we honestly believe that it should have proper sup- 
port. No college in the land has more loyal sons than 
are the alumni of Aggie ; and we believe that when 
they realize the desperate straits to which their col- 
lege paper is reduced, they will be certain to help it 
out of its difficulty. All contributions should be sent 
to the business manager ; and those who do see fit to 
aid the paper at this time, may rest assured that their 
kindness will not pass unappreciated. 



^orvtrEhu-tecI , 



AMERICAN STUDENTS IN GOTTINGEN. 
Posted upon the bulletin board in North college is 
a notice concerning the University of Gottingen, Ger- 
many, sent out by the Patriach of the American col- 
ony at that place. This is worth the careful consid- 
eration of every student who intends to pursue his 
studies beyond his college course, especially in the 
sciences, Such students will naturally seek the best 
instruction that can be obtained, at the smallest out- 
lay. It would be far from my purpose to intimate 
that one cannot obtain as good and thorough instruc- 
tion in advanced studies in this country, as in a Ger- 
man University, but I would call attention to some 
considerations which might influence one to choose the 
latter. In the first place, a sojourn in a foreign coun- 
try is in itself not only pleasant but very instructive, 
and it is generally admitted that nothing so broadens 
the ideas as a cosmopolitan experience. Again, one 
is thrown in with, and makes the acquaintance of 
men who are doing the most advanced work in the 
sciences, men whose names one sees quoted in every 
scientific journal. The influence gained by such con- 
tact is most advantageous. Further, one obtains, 
without particular exertion, a good working knowledge 



at least, of the German language and thus opens an 
immense field of scientific literature containing the 
originals of many of the newest and best contributions, 
which otherwise can be made available only by much 
special study. In regard to the expense, I am quite 
convinced that one can spend two years in Gottingen, 
including the fares there and back, with perhaps a 
limited amount of travel to some of the principal 
European cities, and with proper care, not spend more 
than would be necessary for the same length of study 
in this country, where one was obliged to live away 
from home. Gottingen is especially favorable in this 
respect, being a comparatively small place, and the 
expenses are consequently lighter than they will be in 
a large city. It is moreover very pleasantly located 
and always has a number of Americans, so that one 
occasionally has the pleasure of using and hearing his 
native language. 

Aggie has sent a number of her sons there, all of 
whom now occupy good positions in this country. So 
many, in fact, that M. A. C. is better known by the 
University authorities there than some of the larger 
institutions. This is illustrated in the following inci- 
dent, the truth of which is vouched for in Gottingen. 
A graduate of Yale went there to matriculate, and on 
being asked from what institution he had graduated in 
America, replied "Yale University." " Yale, Yale," 
responded the Dean, " Is that anywhere near the 
Mass. Agricultural college in Amherst? " A list of 
our graduates who have studied there and obtained 
the degree of Ph. D., with their present positions, will 
speak for itself : 

Chas. Wellington, 73, Associate Prof, of Chemis- 
try, M. A. C. H. E. Stockbridge, 78, until recently, 
president of the No. Dakota Agricultural college. J. 
H. Washburn, 78, President of the Rhode Island 
Agricultural college. W. E. Stone, '82, Vice-Presi- 
dent and Prof, of Chemistry, Purdue Univ., Indiana. 
J. B. Lindsey, '82, Head of the Dept. of Foods and 
Feeding, Hatch Experiment Station, Amherst, H. J. 
Wheeler, '83, Chemist at the Rhode Island Experi- 
ment Station. E. W. Allen, '85, Vice-Director, 
Office of Experiment Stations, Washington. E. R. 
Flint, '87, Assistant Prof, of Chemistry, M. A. C. 
Those who have gone from here have all taken their 
degrees in Chemistry, but Gottingen offers equal ad- 
vantages in most of the other sciences. 



i62 



aggie Life. 



By addressing Mr. Fitch, Patriarch of the Ameri- 
can Colony, Gottingen, Germany, an interesting illus- 
trated pamphlet, in English, giving full information 
about Gottingen and the University there, can prob- 
ably be obtained. All of those who have been there 
will join me in recommending those of you who in- 
tend pursuing your studies further, to a careful con- 
sideration of Gottingen, before deciding and would be 
pleased to answer any questions and give any infor- 
mation in regard to the same, in their power. 

E. R. F. 



THE BALLOT— ITS USE AND ABUSE. 

As the present century draws to a close it seems 
fitting that we should review the history of our coun- 
try to find out its successes and failures; its success- 
es, that we may strive to imitate them in the future, 
its failures that they may serve as lessons of warning. 

We are justly proud of the progress that our country 
has made but we cannot ignore the fact that in our polit- 
ical life there have been many corruptions that ought 
to make us Americans blush with shame. We have 
known that the lawful use of the ballot has been per- 
verted in local, state, and even in national affairs. We 
have seen the metropolis of the Western Hemisphere 
held, for many years, under the sway of a corrupt band 
of politicians who have managed by political intrigue 
to gain control of all the public positions in that city, 
and to use the power and public funds thus obtained to 
further their own ambition or that of their political 
supporters. We have, as I say, known that these 
evils exist yet what has been accomplished to effect 
a reform? If the love of country is as strong to-day as 
it was one hundred years ago why does it not assert 
itself? Where does the power to remedy this existing 
state of affairs lie? It lies with the people. They 
have the right of voting and it is for them to decide 
whether they will cast their ballot for right and just- 
ice or for corruption and fraud. 

Let us for a moment consider the people who enjoy 
the right of suffrage: First there is the class of vo- 
ters who use the bollot as an expression of their 
wishes. Second there is the class of voters who are 
open to corruption. They use the ballot for private 
gain and are the tools of political machines. Third 
there are the so called stay-at-home voters. In the 
first class are found the citizens who are our country's 



mainstay. Whatever their opinion may be they vote 
for what they consider is best for the nation's welfare. In 
the second class is the dangerous element. It is 
distinctly un-American both in principal and in practice 

At first thought it may seem strange that they will 
so abuse the rightful use of the ballot but when we 
consider that many of those who enjoy suffrage were 
brought up in foreign lands and under foreign influen- 
ces we cannot wonder. It did not cause them much 
trouble to become naturalized, scheming politicians 
who wished to control their votes looked out for that. 

Their forefathers were not the patriots who secured 
the independence of our land and at a later period 
when our country was threatened with disunion no self 
sacrifice on their part helped avert the impending dis- 
aster. In short many of the voters of this class des- 
pise the privelege that they possess. 

We come now to the last class, the stay-at-home 
voters, or, in other words, the people who enjoy the 
right of suffrage but do not use it. It is this class of 
citizens on whom rests the responsibility for political 
evils. They see the need of reform yet they take no 
steps to aid it. They seem to think that government 
is like a perpetual motion machine that will go on and 
on and never stop, but where the energy comes from 
to keep up this motion they do not consider. When 
asked why they do not take any interest in public 
affairs the answers too often are, "0, we haven't 
time ; " " My vote won't change the result." One vote 
in itself is indeed small, but if the votes of this class 
of citizens be taken collectively they will amount to 
an enormous figure. There are two reasons why one 
should vote and vote for principle : 

First, to vote is a privilege. 

Scan the pages of history and you will find that hun- 
dreds of the struggles of ancient as well as of modern 
times have been caused by the people trying to put 
down tyranny and to obtain for themselves a voice in 
the government. ' Think of the early struggles of our 
forefathers, of their self-sacrifice and devotion in order 
to obtain the right of governing themselves, and will 
you then ask if it is a privilege to vote ? 

Second, to vote is a duty. 

Citizenship always carries with it a sense of obliga- 
tion. As the government protects the lives and prop- 
erty of a people it in turn has the right to require them 
to maintain and protect it. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



163 



One of the great reasons why there is so much cor- 
ruption in our political affairs is because there are so 
many who enjoy the right of suffrage that are not in 
sympathy with our American institutions. It often 
happens that before the newly-arrived immigrant has 
had time to learn the English language, much less to 
come in touch with American ideas, he has the right 
of citizenship bestowed upon him by political schemers 
who wish to control his vote. Is this the glory of our 
free institutions ? Has the old Anglo-Saxon love of 
independence died out of our hearts that we permit 
such outrages ? But what can we do to put a stop to 
this wholesale corruption ? 

Many would say " take away the right of suffrage 
from such as are incompetent to use it rightly." 
Others would say, " establish an educational qualifica- 
tion and thus let only the intelligent vote." At first 
these may seem possible solutions of the problem but 
when we consider the mass of voters who would be 
thus disqualified we can see what a constant menace 
these people would be to the life of the republic. No, 
the right to vote cannot be taken from those who 
already enjoy its privileges. We must seek some 
other means. Let there be enacted a uniform law of 
naturalization that will withhold citizenship from aliens 
until they have been long enough in this country to 
become Americanized and will take the oath of alle- 
giance to the United States in good faith. 

As the ballot is an educating factor in itself let us 
hope that those who now pervert its rightful use will in 
time become its loyal champions. Ballot reform in 
various ways may do much to remedy the existing 
evils, but after all it is to the youth of our land that 
we must turn if we expect a complete reform 

Let the public schools and colleges in our land 
inspire in their hearts a love of country. Tell them at 
what sacrifices our free institutions were founded and 
at what a cost our government has been maintained. 
Then you will indeed have a race of giants that the 
hosts of corruption will try in vain to overcome. 

In the future let the typical American be he who 
puts country before party, and justice before ambition. 

G. A. D. 



— All College exercises were suspended on Mon- 
day, April 20th, for the observance of Patriots-Day 
which came on Sunday. 



THE COLLEGE BASEBALL TEAM. 

In writing a criticism of the ball team we must not 
simply confine our attention to the team as a whole, 
but must consider each individual player, his style of 
playing, his fitness for the team, and how he may be 
able to fill one place better than another, and above 
all the harmony among the players, and the unity of 
all playing together to make the very valuable part of 
team play. 

This has been an important factor in the picking of 
the men. Men have been chosen to play their posi- 
tions who have proved themselves hard, earnest, and 
faithful workers, men whom the student body honor 
and respect, and above all who have the best interests 
of Aggie at heart. 

Judging the men by the two games which have been 
played we would make the following criticisms both as 
to individual and general team work : 

In Capen the college has a catcher who is most 
faithful in his work, always anxious to do his share 
and thus far he has done it well. As a backstop he 
is excellent, though he must improve in catching high 
fouls, and start his throw quicker to the bases if he 
would wish to better his play and gain confidence 
from the whole team. 

We cannot give our pitcher, Eaton, a just criticism 
as he has pitched but one game, and that his first. In 
that game however he acquitted himself proudly using 
head as well as speed. He has yet to learn the art 
of covering first and home bases while they are 
neccessarily left vacant. He is weak on pop flies. 

First base has been covered by Leamy. This 
player has had more experience on our college team 
than any other man and his playing goes to show the 
real value of that experience, As a first baseman he 
is a main stay, while he can go behind the bat if 
necessary. He is also one of our best batters. 

On second base we find a man new to college base- 
ball. Inexperienced as he may be his playing is often 
that of a veteran. Emrich plays an excellent game 
in the field, covering lots of ground, though he is 
often tempted to spoil many a good pickup by trying 
to make too quick a throw. He should also improve 
in the swinging of his stick. 

Thus far third base has been taken care of by Read. 
With all the experience and many years of training 



164 



AGGIE LIFE. 



which he has had he shows the least improvement of 
any of the players. His throwing is always up to par, 
but in batting and fielding he is often found wanting. 

In short-stop Marshall is the strength and life of the 
team. His fielding is sharp, his throwing excellent. 
As captain he is a worthy example to follow both at 
bat and in the field. 

Hinds is playing in his first year and for one so 
inexperienced is doing fairly good work. In his posi- 
tion at left field he has an important duty to perform, 
and while he is death on all flies that drop right into 
his hands when it comes to a long run he is slow in 
starting, and seldom if ever connects with the ball. 
He must start quicker and cover more ground. 

Warden has been placed in center-field to steady 
those on either side of him, and he is a sure fielder 
and covers lots of ground, he accepts many chances 
that might otherwise be taken by the other fielders. 
His throwing is above the average. 

In right field we have an open space which as yet 
has not been satisfactorily filled. Norton, Harper, 
Shaw and Edwards have all been tried in this position 
but none of them are up to college form. 

In Shaw we have a very fair substitute infielder. 
He is very erratic, both in fielding and batting, often 
making a brilliant catch of a difficult fly ball only to 
follow it up with a miserable misplay of the easiest 
kind of a ground ball. His throwing is excellent and 
accurate. 

Taken as a whole the men play well together, and 
now as they are beginning to understand each other's 
style of play, and keep gaining confidence, we must 
look for victories and for the very best support from 
the student body. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE BURNHAM PRIZE 
SPEAKING. 

The following men from the Sophomore and the 
Freshman classes have been chosen to speak before 
the Faculty. From each list, four men will be chosen 
to represent the classes at Commencement. 

Sophomores: Adjemian, Baxter, Clark, Eaton, 
Montgomery, Nickerson, Warden, Wiley, Wright, G.H. 

Freshmen: Armstrong, Beaman, Canto, Dutcher, 
Hinds, Hubbard, B. H. Smith, Turner, Walker, 
Wright, E. M, 



BASEBALL. 
Aggie 7 ; Haydenville 12. 

The home team was defeated on the campus in the 
first game of the season Saturday, April 24. Until 
the fifth inning the game was easily Aggie's, but in 
the fifth a base hit, two bases on balls, a muffed fly 
and careless playing in the in field started the scoring 
for the visitors and when the inning closed eight men 
had crossed the plate. Though only two runs were 
made afterwards yet the lead was too large to be 
overcome and the game was lost by the score of 12 
to 7. 

Considering that this is the first game of the sea- 
son and the first time the men have played together 
this is not a very bad score and with more team work 
and less carelessness on the part of the players the 
team should make a very great improvement. 

The game started out with Aggie in the field. For 
Haydenville the first three men sent to bat made easy 
outs, while Aggie in* her half sailed into the game 
sending three men across the plate before the inning 
closed. Thus far the game looked liked an easy 
victory, and when in the third the home team made 
two more runs visions of something besides defeat ran 
through the Aggie " rooters." For three innings 
Haydenville came to the bat only to score " goose- 
eggs." In the fourth she made two runs and in the 
fifth — Oh miserable fifth ! — eight men ran around the 
diamond while the home team was laid up with a bad 
case of rattles. When they recovered the game was 
hopelessly lost, still they played good ball for the 
rest of the game and but for an unfortunate inning 
would have won. For Aggie, Marshall played the 
best game both at bat and in the field. Read pitched 
a good game with the exception of the fifth inning 
when he gave too many bases on balls. Leamy, 
Emrich and Hinds played well. 





AGGIE. 
















A.B. 


R. 


B. 


T.B. 


P.O 


A. 


E. 


Emrich, 2b., 


5 




3 





1 


5 





Warden, c.f., 


5 
















1 


Read, p.. 


3 













1 





Hinds, l.f., 


4 










3 





1 


Leamy, lb., 


4 




1 





12 








Marshall. 3b., 


5 


2 


2 


3 


2 


4 





Shaw, s.s., 


4 





1 





4 


1 


4 


Capen, c, 


3 











S 








Norton, r.f., 


2 

















I 


Edwards, r.f.. 


2 




















Totals, 


37 


7 


7 


3 


27 


1 1 


7 


Innings, 


1 


2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 


8 9 




Aggie, 


3 





2 


c 





1 1 


-7 


W. P— 0. P. B.— 2. 


B, on B.— 5. Struck out— Read 5, 









AGGIE LIFE. 



i65 



Aggie 4 ; Trinity 5. 

In the second game of the season Aggie loses one 
of the best games seen in several years, by a score of 
5 to 4 in ten innings. 

The day was fine and Trinity played her best men 
who have been down south this spring getting into 
shape. Aggie had in the box a man who had yet 
to pitch his first 'Varsity game. His success was 
phenominal. You can look a long way and find few 
men who, in the critical moments of the game, when 
the noise of the " rooters " is deafening, can control 
the ball and put it over the plate ; but, when you con- 
sider a man doing this in his first game and that a 
ten-inning one, with a score 5 to 4, you have indeed 
found an exception. We predict a bright future for 
Mr. Eaton. 

When Capt. Marshall was injured so badly that he 
had to be taken from the field, things looked exceed- 
ingly dark for M. A. C, but Mr. Shaw filled his place 
admirably, and when later he drove upon the field, 
bandaged, but ready to encourage, the team was filled 
with new life and all but won the game. 

The history of the game by innings is as follows : 
In the first, Warden and Hinds left on bases. Glaze- 
brook scored on errors. Second, a shut-out for both 
sides. Third, ditto. Fourth, Marshall is hit in the 
cheek by a foul ball off his own bat. Shaw takes his 
place, makes a base hit and scores on an error. 
Trinity is shut out. Game, one all. Fifth, Eaton 
scores on errors. Emrich and Warden score on a 
hit by Hinds. Trinity shut out. Game, 4-1. Sixth, 
both sides shut out. Seventh, M. A. C. shut ont. 
Trinity scored on a base hit, a stolen base, sacrifice 
hit and a wild pitch. Eighth, Shut out for both sides. 
Ninth, Shut out for M. A. C. Trinity scores two on a 
base hit and errors. Game, four all. Tenth, Shut 
out for M. A. C. Trinity scores on base hits and a 
long fly to center. 

Several times Aggie had men on bases but failed to 
hit. For Trinity W. Gage, Coggeshall and Flynn 
played the best game. While for Aggie, Eaton, 
Capen and Leamy did good work. 



Emrich. 2b., 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


2 


Warden, c.f., 


5 


1 





3 








Read. 3b.. 


5 








2 


4 


2 


Hinds, l.f., 


5 





1 


1 








Leamy, lb., 


S 





1 


13 








Marshall. Shaw, s.s., 


5 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Harper, r.f., 


S 


u 














Capen, c, 


4 








6 








Eaton, p., 


4 


1 


1 





6 





Totals, 


43 


4 


7 


30 


16 


6 


Innings. 


12 3 4 


5 


9 7 


8 


9 10 





Aggie, 000130000 0—4 

W. P.— 1. P. B.— 1. B. on B — 2. H. by ball— 2. Struck out— Eaton 6. 



Aggie 9 ; Northampton Y. M. C. A. 6. 
Saturday, May 2d, Aggie wins from Northampton 
Y. M. C. A. by the score 9-6. Marshall was back 
into the game though one eye was still partly shaded 
by a big cheek. This accounts for his three errors 
which were more than made up for by his batting and 
base running. Eaton pitched a fair game, but by no 
means as good as his former one. Capen caught 
well but is very weak at bat. Leamy and Emrich 
played the best game for Aggie while Hinckley, 
Keach and Clapp did the best work for the Y. M. C. 
A. The game as a whole was rather loosely played. 
The score : 



M. A. C. 


















B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 




E. 


Emrich. 2b., 
Warden, c.f., 
Leamy, lb.. 
Hinds, l.f., 
Capen. c. 

Marshall (Capt.) s.s.. 
Hooker, r.f.. 
Read. 3b., 
Eaton, p., 




3 
2 

1 




1 
1 



1 


1 

14 
2 
3 
2 

5 



2 




5 

4 
3 




1 



1 
1 

3 



1 

2 


Totals, 




8 


27 


14 




9 


N. Y. M. C. A. 


















B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 




B. 


Lamb. 2b.. 
Hinckley, lb., 
Keach, '.f., 
Clapp. 3b., 
Raleigh, s.s., 
Phelps, p., 
Worsley. c, 
Parson, r.f., 
Godfrey, l.f., 





3 
2 



2 

1 


2 
10 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 

3 


5 


1 
1 
2 
1 








2 



2 
1 
1 




Totals, 




8 


24 


10 




6 


Innings, 1 
M. A. C, 3 
N.Y. M. C. A., 


2 




e 4 

3 



5 6 

2 

1 2 


7 8 

1 

2 1 


9 
0- 

7- 


-9 

-6 


Two-base hits— Hinckley 1. Three-base hits— Hinckley 
balls— by Eaton 2, Phelps 4. Struck out— Phelps 3, Eaton 2. 
Martin of Northampton, Burrington of M. A. C. 


;. Base on 
Umpires — 



THE FOSSIL FERN. 
Deep in the coal mine's damp and dark recess 

Beneath a thousand feet of rocky roof, 
I found a fossil fern, its loveliness 

As delicate as when its fairy woof 
Of rib and vein grew in the wind-swept air 

Beneath a sun more bright and glorious 
Than ours ; upon a youthful world more fair 

Than this old wrinkled world which shelters us. 

The fern is dead, how many years ago : 

Its soul survives the voyage perilous 
Through centuries and countless centuries, 

For it was beautiful. The cruel, slow, 
Relentless years could not consume 

It. Unchanged it still delights our eyes, 
Nay, was it not pgrfected in the tomb? 

j— C. F.J., in Trinity Tablet- 



1 66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Colleg? |Mo-t^s- 



— Run! 

— "Out at First." 

■ — Are you going to Boston May 15th? 

— Window lights about South College and the li- 
brary are breakable. 

— The first battalion drill of the term took place 
Tuesday, April 21st. 

■ — Professor Babson has an interesting French story 
in the last Independent. The title is "Jean Benoit." 

— The chapel pulpit was occupied on Sunday, 
April 26th, by Rev. Samuel J. Austin of Darien, 
Conn. 

— It is hoped that Rev. EdwardEverett Hale will ad- 
dress the Y. M. C. A. on Sunday of commencement 
week. 

— The Ninety-six class albums and the remainder 
of the photographs have arrived, and are ready for 
distribution. 

— Our College baseball team, under the able 
charge of Capt. Marshall is putting in good practice 
every afternoon. 

— Dr. Tuttle of Amherst College spoke before the 
Y. M. C. A. Sunday, April 26, on the subject, "How 
to study the Bible." 

— Owing to the absence of so many of the students 
to spend the holiday, there was no service in the 
chapel on Sunday, April 19th. 

— A "scrub" team from here went over to Hadley 
last Wednesday afternoon, and defeated the Hopkins' 
Academy team in a loosely played game. 

— Mr. G. D. Leavens, '97, who has been suffering 
for over a fortnight from an attack of inflamatory 
rheumatism, is now recovered sufficiently to be out 
again. 

■ — Considering the few drills that the Boston men 
have had since the opening of the term, Lieut. Dick- 
inson has deemed it necessary to give them a few ex- 
tra drills. 

— Lieut. W. M. Dickinson has been appointed to 
act as one of the three judges at the spring gymna- 
sium exhibition to be held at Amherst College this 
afternoon. 



— Mr. George M. Whitaker, Editor of The New 
England Farmer, and Professor Chandler, instructor 
of Sciences at Newton High School, visited the Col- 
lege last Thursday. 

— The Amherst Bird Club went on a trip Wednes- 
day afternoon, April 29. Their observations were 
not as satisfactory as usual, but a pleasant time was 
participated in by the members present. 

— Those wishing cabinet photographs of any of the 
professors, or views of any of the College buildings, 
will do well to call in and examine F. H. Read's stock 
of photographs. He sells them at very reasonable 
prices. 

— On Saturday afternoon, April 18th, the seniors 
played ball against a nine chosen from the other 
classes. The game proved to be an interesting one, 
the former team coming out victorious with the close 
score of 9-8. 

— The tickets for the Boston Prize Drill remaining 
unsold have been sent back to Boston. Those stu- 
dents and alumni who still wish seats in the section 
reserved for M. A. C. should apply to the M. I. T. 
Drill Committee. 

— There were more students at the Bible class 
Sunday morning, April 26th, than for many months. 
This is encouraging ; let the good work continue. Dr. 
Lindsey is a good Bible student, and one cannot but 
profit from his teaching. 

— Mr. George W. Allen of Northborough was here 
for a few days last week visiting his sons, J. W., and 
H. F. Allen both of the class of '97. During his stay 
here he was accommodated at the home of Professor 
Maynard, an old acquaintance. 

— The Massachusetts Agricultural Report for 1895 
has been issued from the press, and President Goodelj 
has obtained enough copies for all the students. Those 
who have not availed themselves of this opportunity, 
can obtain copies by applying at his library office. 

— M. E. Cook, '97, returned to College a few days 
ago for the purpose of removing his goods. He left 
last November on account of rheumatism, from which 
he has since suffered much, and does not as yet know 
whether he will return. Mr. Cook has been a loyal 
classmate and a good student, and it is our sincere 
hope that circumstances will not prevent him from 
returning in the fall. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



167 



— Professor Maynard lectured before the Grange 
and Agricultural Society at Petersham, Wednesday, 
April 29th. His subject was, "Spraying," and re- 
ferred mostly to fruit trees. 

— M. A. C. played Trinity at Hartford.Wednesday, 
April 29th. It was Aggie's second game of the sea- 
son, and justly may her men feel proud of it. It be- 
came necessary to play ten innings because of a tie 
of 4-4 at the end of the ninth. The resulting score 
was 5-4 in favor of Trinity. 

— Dr. G. E. Stone lectured before the Rhode Is- 
land State College Friday, May 1st. His subject, 
"The Growth of Plants," was quite appropriate to the 
day which was appointed by the governor as Arbor 
Day, and the lecture formed a great part of the program 
arranged for its observance. 

— The "Old Chapel" bell has (ap) pealed to us 
twice within a week's time. We consider that the 
second ringing of the bell only sounded out upon the 
midnight air, the fact that someone was trying to force 
a cheap second-hand joke upon the mind of the stu- 
dent disturbed from his slumbers. 

— Friday forenoon, April 24th, the juniors played 
ball against the freshmen. The teams were not very 
evenly matched, and from the beginning there was 
little doubt as to which team would win. The game 
was quite amusing, however, and the resulting score 
was 24-6 in favor of the freshmen. 

— On Monday afternoon, April 20th, the seniors 
played a second game of ball against a team picked 
from the other classes. On account of the absence of 
two of the best players from the senior class, the 
game did not prove as interesting as Saturday's game ; 
and they were defeated by a score of 24- 1 1 . 

— On Saturday afternoon, April 25th, the first base- 
ball game of the season was played against the Hay- 
denville athletes. Our team was defeated by a score 
of 12-7. Had it not been for a few errors made in 
the fifth inning, — whereby the opponents made eight 
runs — our team would without doubt have been 
victorious. 

— The society tennis courts have recently been 
raked over, rolled, and the back nettings fixed in their 
proper places ; after a good rain, they will be in very 
good condition. We hope that all who are interested 



in tennis will put in good practice and that our 
directors may deem it expedient to arrange for a 
tournament before the end of the term. 

— On account of the death of Mr. King, and the 
withdrawal by Mr. Leavens of his name from the six 
men chosen for the Flint prize speaking, it became 
necessary to substitute two more men from the junior 
class to fill these vacancies. The corrected list is as 
follows: J. L. Bartlett, L. F. Clark, G. A. Drew, C. 
I. Goessmann, J. A. Emrich and P. H. Smith. 

— The following men in charge of Lieut. Dickinson 
will compose the squad that is to represent the College 
at Mechanics Hall in Boston, May 15th. From this 
list there will be selected those who are to be in- 
cluded in the prize drill squad : H. C. Burrington, H. 
T. Edwards, A. M. Kramer, S. Sastre, M. E. Sellew, 
J. M. Barry, G. A. Drew, J. A. Emrich, P. H. Smith, 
C. A. Peters, L. L. Cheney, C. A. Norton, E. M. 
Wright, G. H. Wright, A. Montgomery, Jr., R. D. 
Warden, G. F. Keenan, J. P. Nickerson, D. A. Bea- 
man, and J. S. Eaton. 

— Immediately after the dismissal from drill a 
week ago Friday morning, what might have been a 
serious accident was prevented by timely aid. The 
horses hitched to the barge waiting in front of South 
College for the legislative committee, became un- 
manageable. The pole broke, and in less than a 
minute all four horses were badly tangled up in the 
harness, and promised to make considerable trouble. 
Owing to the presence of mind of several students, the 
frightened horses were arrested in their struggles to 
break away ; were untangled, and thus, further trouble 
was prevented. The accident was caused by a rein 
getting caught in such a way as to be rendered useless 
in keeping the horses where they belonged. 

— In the last report of the College, among other 
things it is asked that there be made an appropriation 
of $7,000 for extending the laboratories of the exper- 
iment station, in charge of Dr. Goessmann. This 
building, formerly known as the Massachusetts Exper- 
iment Station, is U shaped and the College proposes 
to build on an addition connecting its two extremities 
thus enclosing a rectangular space which will be 
glassed over. This new addition will not only give 
more room, but also the central portion of the building 
will be put to a practical use in experimenting with 



[68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



plants. Around this part of the building there will be 
constructed a sort of gallery for the storage of apparatus 
not to be put to immediate use. 

— Arbor Day was appropriately observed at Aggie 
this year, by the planting of three class trees. 
Ninety-seven planted a Cork Elm (Ulmus racemosd) , 
a very fine tree, and the only one of that species 
to be found about the College grounds. Ninety- 
eight planted a Black Oak {Quercus coccinea, var. 
tinctoria), and the two years class '96 selected 
and planted a Red Oak (Quercus rubra). This custom 
cannot be too highly commended. It is especially 
through the efforts of Prof. Maynard and the classes 
that have gone before us that the planting of the 
greater part of our trees and shrubs is due ; and with a 
few additions each year, the college grounds will after 
a few years compare very favorably with those of any 
other institution in the state. 

"Gifts that grow are best; 

Hands that bless are blest ; 

Plant : Life does the rest 1 

Heaven and earth help him who plants a tree, 

And his work its own reward shall be." 

— The peach orchard on the hill back of Prof. 
Brooks' house has been completely torn out. The 
trees have not been profitable for the past few years, 
and it has been deemed advisable to transform the land 
into something of a more ornamental nature. The 
land will be plowed, and there will be sown a fodder 
crop, such as will leave the ground in good condition 
for working next spring. It is intended to lay out this 
land into plots, upon which will be planted, the various 
species and types of fruit trees of practical use ; clas- 
sified and arranged in a regular order. Convenient 
ornamental drives and walks will be laid out so as to 
reach all parts of the grounds. If this prospec- 
tive scheme is carried out, these grounds here- 
tofore unattractive, — except when the fruit upon the 
trees was ripening, — will afford, not only a broad field 
for the study of practical horticulure, but will also add 
to the College grounds an ornamental feature which 
will be greatly appreciated by all. 

— The committee on agriculture, education and mil- 
itary affairs from the state legislature visited College 
Friday, April 24th. There were about thirty mem- 
bers in all who arrived at the chapel at 8 o'clock and 
went in for the regular morning prayers. After chapel 



service, and a few words of welcome from President 
Goodell, the party spent a few minutes in the library 
below and by this time the battalion had formed for 
an exhibition drill. After drill, all College exercises 
having been suspended for the day, the visitors were 
shown through the buildings and about the grounds by 
the President, accompanied by some of the Profes- 
sors and a few students. They seemed to be very 
much pleased with the College and appeared to be 
especially interested in the dairy department of the 
new College barn. The pasteurization of milk prob- 
ably afforded to them the most interesting process in- 
cluded in the study of dairying as it is illustrated here. 
Each member had an ample opportunity for testing 
the dairy products at his heart's content. Strange to 
say there was a scarcity of milk at the barn for a day 
or so, but then they do not visit us but once a year, 
and if they, as loyal citizens and true to the interests 
of the state will upon their return to Boston vote 
wisely with reference to the much needed appropria- 
tions for M. A. C.,we are sure all of us will be able to 
recall at least their last annual visit with much 
pleasure. 



flotes &nd ^"©mmervtf. 

There is an old saying "Everything comes to him 
who waits" which we hope the Cuban patriots 
have in mind as they anxiously wait for President 
Cleveland to say the word that might make the island 
free. While Cuba is being rapidly desolated by fire 
and famine ; while the Cubans are offering up their 
lives as sacrifices for their country's freedom, the 
President of our own glorious, free Republic is wait- 
ing for Spain to institute reforms. It reminds one of 
the way England waited for Turkey to institute reforms 
in Armenia. Even if Spain does institute political re- 
forms in Cuba what benefit will the occupants of that 
vast graveyard derive from them? 



The British farmer is not nearly so prosperous or 
progressive as his American cousin, and he is not 
without blame for the state of affairs in which he finds 
himself. If distant parts of the world can raise grain 
and produce and ship it to London at less cost than 



AGGIE LIFE. 



169 



can the English farmer, surely the latter is somewhere 
seriously at fault. He is on the ground and has the 
advantage of a climate and soil, generally considered 
superior : but the trouble is largely a matter of trans- 
portation. It costs more to convey produce from re- 
mote parts of England to London that it does to bring 
jt there from the western states of America, from 
New Zealand, or Australia. The British farmers lack 
the proper facilities for reaching their own market. 
When the railways have been willing to co-operate 
with them they have been too jealous of each other to 
organize for self protection. When these farmers 
combine as intelligent business men they will be able 
to escape from many of their present difficulties. 



The New York state legislature recently passed a 
bill requiring all railroad companies in that state to 
transport bicycles as regular baggage free of charge. 
The bill has been approved and signed by the governor 
and is now a law. This most commendable action 
was the result of the pressure brought to bear by the 
New York Division of the League of American Wheel- 
man. The L. A. W. has done more to promote the 
interests of cycling than all other associations com- 
bined, and as it is particularly strong in New York it 
has been able to secure this favorable legislation. Not- 
withstanding the fact the New York Central and Hud- 
son River Railroad proposes to fight the new law as 
unconstitutional, wheelmen regard their victory com- 
plete, and consider their position secure. Next to New 
York we believe that Massachusetts has the largest 
number of league members of any state in the union. 
It is not improbable that united and well directed ac- 
tion on the part of the wheelmen in this state might 
result in the adoption of similar laws here. In this 
connection we would urge upon all bicycle riders the 
importance of joining the L. A. W. Membership 
costs but one dollar a year, and the benefits derived 
from it are worth ten times that amount. 



Every year, with the melting of the snow on the 
hills and the opening of the ice locked pools, come 
the annual reports of flood and distress from the val- 
leys. These annual floods are very destructive, not 



only to houses, land and the river itself but also to 
human life. Tons upon tons of valuable mineral mat- 
ter are swept out to sea every year, leaving the soil in 
a barren condition and costing the farmer a great 
deal of time and money to replace. While it is im- 
possible to absolutely stop these freshets much can be 
done to modify them. This cannot be done, however, 
without the expenditure of a considerable sum of 
money, and the farmer does not always have any 
spare cash on hand. If he would stop to think how 
much each of these freshets cost him he would be 
more in favor of protecting himself from them. The 
protections consist in encouraging the growth of the 
forests at the heads of rivers, the building of roads of 
stouter material than dirt and clay, and their construc- 
tion higher on the hillsides where they lead through 
valleys that are liable to floods. The old wooden 
bridges must be done away with, and iron bridges 
with high safe anchorage must be constructed. As 
has been previously stated these improvements can 
not be done without expert and expensive superinten- 
dence and the use of costly material, and the farmer 
who is apt to see not a great ways beyond his nose, 
always objects to an immediate outlay, no matter how 
much it may save him in the future. 



The cause of good roads in this part of Massachu- 
setts received a marked impetus several weeks ago by 
the organization of the Connecticut Valley Highway 
association. Methods and problems will be discussed 
and how to take best advantage of the materials placed 
by nature, how to make appropriations go farthest and 
do the most good will be learned by the exchange of 
experience. We are glad to see that the roads are 
going to receive more attention than they have here- 
tofore, as the roads around here are sloughs of deep 
mud as soon as the frost leaves the ground. It is es- 
timated that there are tributary to every mile of main 
roads, a thousand acres of land. Two or three thous- 
and dollars would transform a bad road into a good one 
and mean a tax of only $2 or $3 an acre. As a 
consequence of this outlay the value of land would 
be increased, the wear and tear on horses and vehicles 
would cease and work in the spring become a pleas- 
ure while now it is a drudgery, 



170 



AGGIE LIFE. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

The Scholar in Politics, by Hon. Richard Olney. 
This is an address that was delivered before the 
alumni of Brown University. Mr. Olney was made 
Secretary of State by President Cleveland and has 
been very prominent in the Cuban and Venezuela 
questions. His address is short and well worth 
reading. 

A History of Architecture. By A. D. F. Hamlin. 
This book was presented to the college by the author 
who is a graduate of Amherst college, and is now 
Adjunct Professor of Architecture in Columbia col- 
lege, New York. It is written chiefly for a text book 
for college students and contains many illustrations in- 
tended to explain the text besides many pictures of 
places that are famous for their architectural beauty. 
The author shows the advance in the art of construct- 
ing beautiful edifices and describes the various styles 
of architecture that have been developed in different 
countries. 



Wanted-Io Idea 



Who can thinte 

of some simple 
thing to patent? 
Protect your ideas; they may bring you wealth. 
Write JOHN WEDDERBURN & CO., Patent Attor- 
neys, Washington, D. C, for their $1,800 prize offer 
and list of two hundred inventions wanted. 



\ Q times out of }Q 

The New York Journal recently of- 
fered ten bicycles to the ten winners 
in a guessing contest, leaving the 
choice of machine to each. 



ALL CHOSE 



Coin 



mbi 

Bicycles 




Nine immediately, and 
one after he had looked 
at others. The Journal 
therefore bought TEN 
Columbias at $100 each. 

On even terms a Columbia will be chosen 

TEN times out of TEN- 



POPE MANUFACTUPJNG CO. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 
1896 Art Catalogue for two 2-cent stamps. 

EJ. R. BEJJV^E^TT, Agent. 



ASTINCS, 



PS 



kfeM„ 



The PhotofflDher from Boston, 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



BSS WORK FOQ GLHSS OF 'S6, J0.H.G. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 
146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Dnnr D 



LLIAfjDAND FOOL pfljS. 



~«&W&t 



THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



13, 15 & 17 Pleasant St., 



Northampton, Mass. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

Uvery, peedand Boarding Stable 

Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 164. 

Pleasant Street, - - Amherst, Mass. 



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SCHIKKARE'S 

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Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

108 Main Stkeet, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL AND WOOD. 

THOMAS C. DIEEOM, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AND FREE BURNING COALS 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



*BILLMRD AND READING PARLOR.* 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



1850. 



■ GO TO- 



1895. 



LULL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOE THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and Group Iflopk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
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E. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 



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S. A. PHILLIPS, 

JFraefieal Mtisalbw, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



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RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

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AND 



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JTRINGS FOB VIOLIN, BAliO km GUITAR. 



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a fl a 



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Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



(Dassaehusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 

WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Parcheron Horses and Southdown Sheep, 

And we beg to announce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST. MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS* 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST. MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. and ROCHESTER, $1.09 UP. VERT HAND- 

SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $3.50. 

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I ^s^t I I ? J 



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OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
TEAMS. 



PHOENIX row: 



PRICES REASONABLE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



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FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

:rtt:b:b;e::k o-ooids. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



epairing done while you zvait,^& 

2 mas if ix row. 



9 



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BOARDIKG 



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Hacks to and from all trains. 
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Chase's Bam, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 



I, 



F 



or. 



WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 

SECOND-HAND TEXT-BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLD 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 
HAIR BRESSOTG ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



=» 9 

PHARMACIST. 
NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night calU responded to at residence, first door 
"west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry* 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Aggie Agent, O. 1^. F»^%.IvlVEEJI* '©■y. 
Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

?3irSATISFACTION C3-XJ^\.R.A.IsrTBEI3. QJZEF- 

Office : 

Next Door West of Amitt St. School House. 

C. D. UTLEY & CO., 

Barge lo and from all Trains. 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS TO ORDEK 

S@»SPECIAL RATES..:®? 
Passenger to center, ------ joe. 

Passenger to Aggie, ------- 25c. 

2 Passengers to Aggie, ------ 40c. 

3 or more passengers to Aggie, - 15c. each. 
Passenger and trunk, ------ 25c 

Barge furnished for parties and clubs. 



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BUY YOUR SUPPLIES OF 

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Botany Supplies, Sum Paper, Lens 

HERBARIUM SLIPS, &c. 

STATIONERY, PAPER, 
wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

In fact everything which a student may find himself in need 

ol from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's 

Celebrated Gloria can be had at 

Hllen Brothers' fiigai Bargain Emporium. 



w. w. moTEWTm 

MANUFACTURER OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Students and Alumni wisliing to ob- 
tain back numbers of Aggie Life may 
get them by addressing 

JOHN MARSHAL BARRY, 

Business Manager Aggie Life, 

m. A. College. 

Amherst, Mass. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JAC1CSOH & CUTLER. 

They make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 

B. W. BLQBEETT & ED., 

Merchant Tailors 



■ AND DEALERS IN • 



READY-MADE CLOTHING. 

We give you a -watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coats and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

&3=-Repairing neatly done at short notice. 



Esq. W. Hlodgett & En. 

COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Hooks, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 



OPPOSITE TOWN HALL. 



a Oca ■ 



Our store has been repaired and improved throughout, and 
our stock of 

Furniture, Carpets, Draperies, Shades, etc., 

is all new. We solicit an inspection. 



R. B. EDWARDS, 

25 and 27 Pleasant St., - Northampton, Mass. 




VOL. VI. 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE 17, 1896. 



NO. 15 



C 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Mass. Agr'l College. 

Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Postage outside United States and Canada, 25c. extra. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

GEORGE DAVISON LEAVENS, '97, Editor-in-Chief. 

JOHN MARSHALL BARRY, '97, Business Manager. 

ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, Jr., '98, As'st Business Manager. 

CLAYTON FRANKLIN PALMER, '97, College Notes. 

CHARLES IGNATIUS GOESSMANN, '97, Notes and Comments. 

JOHN ALBERT EMRICH, '97. Exchange. 

RANDALL DUNCAN WARDEN, '98, Athletics. 

GEORCE HENRY WRIGHT, '98, Alumni Notes. 

WARREN ELMER HINDS. '99, Library Notes. 

FREDERICK HARVEY TURNER. '99. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should 
be addressed, Aggie Life, Amherst, Mass. 

Aggie Life will be sent to ail subscribers until its discontinuance is 
ordered and arrears paid. 



Another class steps forth from our college walls to 
enter upon the busy life of the outside world. The 
grave and dignified seniors who leave us are men well 
prepared for the struggles of life. Throughout their 
college course the men of '96 have been leaders. In 
the class-room, on the athletic field, and in the man- 
agement of the various college organizations, '96 has 
won distinction for its members and nobly upheld the 
honor of our alma mater. To the men of '96 we have 
been accustomed to turn for advice, and by their 
advice and by their example they have helped many 
an underclassman, and made many a man more 
manly. Their influence for good will remain after 
they have gone, and the men of '96 will ever be held 
in highest esteem by the friends and fraternity brethren 



they leave behind them. The whole student body 
unites in wishing the members of '96 God speed, and 
in extending to them heartiest wishes for a successful 
future. 



That it should have been necessary to discontinue 
the publication of the Life, for even a short time, is a 
matter of sincere regret to the editorial board. The 
fact that it was impossible to meet the running expenses 
of the paper was in itself sufficient to justify such a 
course ; but when in addition to this the large debt 
previously contracted is taken into consideration, it 
will be seen that suspension became imperative. 
Since the publication of the last edition of the Life 
every effort has been made to place the paper once 
more upon a sound financial footing. Appeals for aid 
have been made to the student body, to the faculty, 
and to the alumni. Thanks to generous contributions 
from these sources we are enabled to announce that 
the debt has been greatly reduced, and that we believe 
that there will be no further interruption of publication. 
However, a considerable amount of this debt is still 
unpaid, and we earnestly hope that those of our alumni 
who maybe visiting here during commencement week 
will not fail to make generous contributions to their 
college paper. 



At the close of this college year, we lose one of our 
most popular and most able instructors, Lieutenant 
Walter M. Dickinson, who has been commandant of 
cadets and instructor in military science at Aggie for 
the past four years is to leave us. Whether on the 
parade ground or in the class room, Lieutenant Dick- 
inson has always commanded the admiration and 
esteem of the students in his charge. As a soldier 
and a gentleman he has set a worthy example to the 
men he has been training, He has always maintained 
a system of military discipline that has insured respect 
for authority and obedience to orders without becoming 



172 



AGGIE LIF. 



irksome, and it is owing to his endeavors that the batt- 
alion stands to-day better than it has ever been before. 
The Lieutenant's term of duty here has been marked 
by many improvements in the military department, 
improvements that have been largely due to his influ- 
ence. Among these may be mentioned the laying of 
the hard wood floor in the drill hall, the construction 
of the visitors' gallery, and the erection of the new 
gun shed. Nor has he shown less interest in the suc- 
cess of student enterprise than in the matters pertain- 
ing strictly to his own department. To his exertion is 
due the fact that representatives of our battalion were 
enabled to enter the competitive prize drill in Boston ; 
and that we succeeded in defeating two universities of 
the size of Brown and of Harvard is due to his careful 
training. The success of the military ball for the 
past two seasons has been due largely to his aid, while 
college teams and the college paper are deeply 
indebted to him for generous gifts toward their support. 
It is therefore with extreme regret that we part with 
an instructor who has discharged the duties of his 
office so faithfully, and at the same time done so 
much to aid the students and their enterprises- 
Wherever Lieutenant Dickinson's next post may be, 
the sincere respect and hearty goodwill of every under- 
graduate goes with him. 



The Board of editors of Aggie Life desire to thank 
the following gentleman for their contributions to help 
clear off the debt. The debt has been greatly reduced, 
and we trust that in the future the paper will be man- 
aged so that no such debt will be incurred. " A friend 
in need is a friend indeed," and we desire to thank 
the following gentlemen for their kindness : 
Prest. H. H. Goodell. Prof. F. S. Cooley. 

Dickinson. Prof. Chas. Wellington. 



Lieut. W. M 

Prof. Wm. P. Brooks. 

Prof. Chas.A.Goessmann 

Prof. R. E. Smith. 

Prof. Flint. 

Prof. Herman Babson. 

Prof. Lehnert. 

A. W. Lublin '84. 

Dr. Lindsey. 

J. H. Putnam '94. 

Howard N. Legate. 

G. B. Willard. 

H. J. Fowler '94. 

H. M. Thomson. 

Geo. D. Leavens. 



Prof. Leonard Metcalf. 
Prof. George E. Stone. 
Prof. S. T. Maynard. 
Prof. Geo. F. Mills. 
Rev. C. S. Walker. 
Prof. Hasbrouck. 
R. H. Smith '92. 

E. A. Jones. 

R. A. Cooley '95. 
A. C. Curtis '94. 
Edw. B. Holland. 

F. A. Smith. 

H. H. Roper '96. 
John M. Barry '97. 



Allen Bros. '97. 
F. L. Clapp '96. 
R. D. Warden '98. 
F. H. Turner '99. 
L. F. Clark '97. 
C. A. Peters '97. 
S. W. Wiley '98. 
H. S.Ashley, Two Yrs 
L. J. Shepard '96. 
J. P. Nickerson '98. 
C. N. Baxter '98. 
C. A. Norton '97. 
J. L. Bartlett '97. 
W. E. Chapin '99. 
W. A. Dye, Two Yrs 
We also desire to 
their subscriptions. 



C. F. Palmer '97. 

Alex. Montgomery Jr. '98. 

G. H. Wright '98. 

W. E. Hinds '99. 

C. G. Clark '98. 

G. A. Drew '97. 

C. E. Stacy '99. 
'97. J. C. Burrington. 

Wms. Eaton. 

H. J. Armstrong '97. 

C. D. Colburn. 

C. M. Walker '99. 

A. B. Cook '96. 

W. S. Fisher '98. 
. '97. 
thank those who have paid up 

Aggie Life Board. 



THE PERPETUITY OF THE UNITED STATES 

AS A REPUBLIC. 
Delivered at Tremont Temple, Boston, June 3rd. 

In the month of September, seventeen hundred and 
ninety-six, President Washington delivered his Fare- 
well Address to the American people. It is but nat- 
ural therefore, that, mindful of the prophetic warnings 
of that serious voice, we should be led to consider, in 
this centennial year, to what degree the evils which 
Washington predicted, affect the prospective perpetuity 
of our national government. The evils of partisanship 
and the perils of dis-union were the key notes of that 
famous document, and what American to-day, mind- 
ful of Antietam, of Gettysburg, and of the Battles of 
the Wilderness, with thoughts reverting to the tragic 
death of Lincoln and of Garfield, dare call Washing- 
ton an alarmist? Fulfillment is the only just criterion 
of prophecy and the prediction of Washington stands 
justified by the event. But is the danger past, can we 
regard ourselves as safe against the recurrence of 
these woes? The thing which has been is the thing 
which shall be ; and perils past are but the finger- 
posts to perils yet to come. It is this fact which gives 
alarming significance to the timely echoes of that 
Farewell Address and leads to the question, — " Can 
our republic live ? " 

Republican government is no longer an experiment ; 
the doctrine of government by the whole people is the 
accepted doctrine to-day, and even England, with her 
monarchial institutions, is in many ways more demo- 
cratic than the United States. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



173 



Modern as the idea of republican government may 
seem, it is a time-worn experiment. Greece, by a 
well-marked development, rose step by step, until in 
the Age of Pericles, we have an example of the purest, 
most democratic government the world has ever seen. 
Yet, never did a race of freedom -loving citizens sink 
as did the Greeks. Personal envy, avarice, and an 
uncentralized government caused her downfall. Then 
comes Rome, conqueror of the world ! The Eternal 
City rose in power and grandeur, all nations paid her 
tribute ; where lies she now ? The ruthless hand of 
Time has torn away her veil of beauty, the ivy creeps 
where Cicero's voice was heard ; her echoing halls lie 
crumbling in the dust. A magnificent empire, a glo- 
rious republic, she now lies, a striking example of the 
truth that " no great nation begins its fall until its 
morals are corrupted." There are no better examples 
of the ancient republics than these. They rose to a 
height in many respects more exalted than that which 
we have reached to-day, and yet, they are no more. 

And why ? Was it because of some underlying 
quality peculiar to Greek and to Roman that their 
social structures were undermined ? No, it was due 
to qualities inherent in the whole human race, — in the 
Greek, in the Roman, in the Frenchman, and in the 
American. The ancients, like the Utopian philoso- 
phers, left out the ugly account of sin, rearing govern- 
ments which were temples to selfishness, avarice, and 
pride. 

The rise of republican government presents two dis- 
tinct methods. In Greece.we have a government evolved 
by a long process of education, while the Republic of 
Rome was founded by revolution. In modern times, 
France, goaded by the oppression of her kings, throws 
off the yoke, and establishes, by revolution, her free 
institutions. It has been said that America, likewise, 
is a republic of revolution. This may be true in part, 
but were not the principles held by the men who set- 
tled this country, the result of a long process of evolu- 
tion ? The war the colonists fought was not so much a re- 
volt against English rule and principles, as it was the de- 
sire for separation from the mother-country, induced by 
acts of Parliament passed under a mis-conception of 
the thoroughly English principles held by the colonists. 
The Republic our fathers set up was not a sudden 
growth ; its establishment was not the result of a revo- 
lution in the minds of its citizens, but was rather the 



evolution of deep-seated and inherited principles. 

From the adoption of the Constitution to the pres- 
ent day, the history of the progress of our country 
shows a marked and rapid development. In fear and 
trembling our fathers took up the administration of 
this republic, sustained only by an undying faith in the 
principles for which they had fought. It was in every 
way an experiment. A confederation of states, each 
with individual power, and yet each obedient to a 
central head, had been beyond the wildest dreams of 
men. It is difficult for us, who see a governmenc 
whose success is unprecedented in the history of the 
world, to realize how doubtful an experiment this repub- 
lic seemed, even to men of sound sense and judgment. 
In a private letter, written in eighteen hundred and 
thirty-six by Henry Cranston, United States senator 
from Rhode Island, he says, " I am sorry to add that 
every day's experience tends to confirm me in the 
opinion I have felt myself compelled to form, that the 
want of public virtue, I mean the want of pure religion 
in the people of this nation, precludes, in my poor 
judgment, all reasonable expectation that our present 
form of government can be carried out through all the 
stages of a successful experiment." These words, 
from the pen of a true patriot, cannot but reflect the 
general feeling of the times. A similar feeling of 
uncertainty respecting the permanence of our institu- 
tions affects men even at the present day. But they 
regard not the factors in our national life which are 
safeguards from disruption. Not least of these is the 
composite character of our people. The blood of 
every civilized nation in the world flows through the 
veins of America's sons, bearing the elements neces- 
sary to constitute a strong and united people. The 
immensity of our population is another assurance of 
the stability of our government, for the aggregation of 
human beings into great masses weakens the individual 
will. This fact, considered in connection with the 
great and growing power of the people, is full of inspi- 
ration to the true American. The people of America 
are one, their hopes for their country are one, and it 
is in the unity and integrity of her citizens that Amer- 
ica trusts. Although we are apparently passing through 
an era of transformation, and although this passing age 
of unprecedented discovery may be the fore-runner of 
an age of great changes in the social fabric, neverthe- 
less, our government has passed the experimental stage. 



174 



AGGIE LII 



The government of the United States in its largest 
and widest aspect, is a single government of a single 
people. It has stood the test of a century of judicial 
decisions and practical administration and finally, it has 
survived, — aye, gloriously survived, — the supreme test 
of war. Through every crisis, through storms of civil 
war and financial panic, our Ship of State has sailed 
grandly on, guided by the unfettered wills of free-born 
men. 

Perils there have been, dangers there shall be ; the 
frowning rocks of financial ruin stare us in the face : 
the direful thunders of a gathering storm of war assail 
our ears, and hidden reefs of party strife, threaten the 
integrity of our state. But we, who as republicans 
have set up and maintained a government in which 
loyalty to abstract principles and not to persons is the 
rule, doubt not the future of our Commonwealth. 
History can show no brighter examples of devotion to 
principle than those seen in our civil war. From North 
and South, men came at their leaders' call, ready to 
shed their blood for an idea. Herein lies the hope of 
our nation, in devotion to principle ; and if our people 
be devoted to principle they must have a conscience, 
and if the voice of the people is the voice of conscience, 
it is the voice of God. 

Francis Edmond de Luce. 



CLASS ORATION. 
" In Omnia Paratus." 
Classmates and friends, as the hour draws near 
which shail sever the ties that for four years have 
drawn us close together in loving, manly sympathy, 
and shall send us adrift on the sea of life, we know 
not wither, how can we better fill the few remaining 
moments than in sober serious, reflection on the past, 
in earnest, hopeful looking forward to the future. 
These days, so full of joys and sorrows, of lights and 
shadows ; so fruitful in priceless opportunities for self- 
culture ; made so bright by the warm handclasp, the 
ready sympathy, the loving service of friends and 
classmates ; so rich in everything which makes life 
grand and beautiful : how can we better end them all 
than by giving expression to the feeling of mingled joy 
and sadness which comes to us to-day ; joy at having 
struggled to the end and received the victors wreath ; 
sadness at the thought of wasted energies and 
neglected opportunities. 



Let us look back. Long-forgotten scenes of college 
life rise before us. We see carelessness and indiffer- 
ence ; too many failures, too many imperfections ; too 
much hasty preparation, too little conscientious study. 
We look back now. We see our folly, but — too late. 
Our college days, with all their unsought treasures, 
have passed away forever, while we sit here in sadness 
and humility, thinking what they might have been. 

Again we look. We are on the campus, in the 
club-room, at our college duties. We meet and 
mingle with friends and classmates. We come in 
contact with nature sensitive to the lightest touch, 
susceptible to the feeblest influence ; equally capable 
of expanding into true and noble manhood or dwarfing 
into a narrow selfishness, as the impressions they 
receive are uplifting or degrading. A kind word here, 
a helping hand there, and friendly sympathy for all ; 
how much might we have done to smooth and brighten 
the pathways of their lives. What strength we might 
have given to the good resolutions, what encourage- 
ment to the noble ambition for a clearer and truer 
conception of life, its duties and its responsibilities. 
But too often have sacrificed friendship on the altar of 
selfishness ; too often has pride stifled conscience ; too 
often has physical or moral indolence silenced the 
promptings of our better nature. Sadly and humbly 
we review the past. However bright the present and 
the future may appear, nothing can blot out the con- 
sciousness of past failure ; nothing can atone for past 
folly but the earnest resolve to do better in the future. 
God grant that we may profit by the past ; that we may 
be more eager to develope the best that is within us 
and to consecrate it to the service of our fellow-men ! 

Once more let us look back. The scene has 
changed. We see our classmates slowly toiling 
upward in the way which they have chosen. From 
ambitions first awakened they climb to loftier heights, 
only to see stretching onward in an endless chain, still 
higher summits of endeavor. Each successive victory 
brings added strength. Each repeated difficulty calls 
forth a latent energy. And though some may have 
undertaken no special line of work, they have never- 
theless attended the one essential object of a college 
education : the knowing how to study ; how to search 
for the exact nature of things ; to separate truth from 
error, the vital from the worthless. In spite of every 
failure, we feel to-day that our college course has not 



AGGIE LIFE. 



[ 75 



been altogether wasted. We feel that it has roused 
ambition, stimulated intellectual growth, and fitted 
us to perform more faithfully and honorably the duties 
of American citizenship. 

In our backward glance, we catch a glimpse of one 
more scene, the brightest, and perhaps the least 
observed of all ; a gradual upbuilding of the man. 
There is something in this intimate association with 
classmates which brings all one's better qualities to 
the surface. We know and have learned to love each 
other, notwithstanding the peculiarities and faults which 
four years ago seemed so glaring. Our college life, 
full of grand opportunities and rich experiences, all 
shared together, has united us in manly friendship, 
which sees not the faults, but the man and the class- 
mate. This close touch with kindred spirits, this sym- 
pathetic union of hopes and ambitions, has had a pow- 
erful influence on life and character ; unconsciously it 
has moulded our plastic natures into nobler and man- 
lier forms. And in spite of faults and failings, in spite 
of temptations unresisted and duties too often neglected, 
in the end the college man is all the stronger for his 
experience and his discipline. He has gained an 
additional self-reliance and manliness which will carry 
him safely through discouragement and failure, and 
anchor him at last in the peaceful harbor of a life over- 
flowing v/ith the riches of self sacrifice and service. 

Our college days are over. We remember some 
with sadness, some with pride. But however much we 
would wish to write it again, the scroll is finished. 
We can only look forward and upward ; forward into 
the mysteries of that which is to come, upwards for 
Divine strength to win the victory. 

Classmates, here under the shadow of our Alma 
Mater with the loved memories of four happy years 
filling each heart with a sadness and a longing ; with 
friends and dear ones gathered round to wish us God- 
speed on life's journey ; here let us put on the armor 
of Christian manhood. Let us strive to live uprightly, 
to act nobly, to think kindly. Let us resolve that the 
world shall not creep in and crowd out from our hearts 
all the higher impulses of our being. Let us be work- 
ers, not dreamers. Let us keep our minds in touch 
with the spirit of progress ; our eyes open to discern 
the good, the true and the beautiful in that which is 
around us ; our hearts the abiding-place of purity, 
piety and truth. What the future shall unfold, we 



know not. We can only leave it in his hands, feeling 
that " Whatever is, is best." 

To-day, from the crowning summit of our college 
course, we look back. Far off in the hazy distance, 
our freshman days appear, crowded with indistinct and 
half-forgotten memories. Nearer and nearer our 
wandering thoughts are drawn, past many a dear famil- 
iar face and scene, till at last we wake to a realization 
of the present. As we look into each other's eyes 
and see reflected there the inward confict of emotions ; 
as we grasp each other's hand and feel the warm 
pressure straight from a classmate's heart ; as we look 
around on Nature, dressed in her fairest robes as 
though for our coronation ; as we think of everything 
which has passed and all that is to come, we feel the 
parting sorrow welling up within us, till our hearts are 
full to overflowing. But ere we turn away, and say — 
goodbye, from every loving, loyal, heart in our dear 
old class, rises our earnest prayer to Him who has 
sustained and guided us through our college life ; 
" Our Alma Mater! God bless her !" 

S. W. Fletcher. 

jj^o-tes and ^ommeirtf. 



After long experience Yale has found that the max- 
imum speed of her crew is attained with the stroke at 
38 to 40. Beyond that point the increased pace is 
inconsiderable while the added exertion is exhausting 
to the men. 



The New York Athletic club is making an earnest 
effort to secure the presence of certain noted English 
athletes in this country the coming fall and if the 
effort proves successful this is sure to result in a 
most sensational event. 



During the past week an article has appeared in 
one of our prominent weeklies exposing the fraudulent 
methods used in the Spanish elections. From all 
appearances the Spanish politician can give our 
"bosses" points on turning popular elections into a 
saturnalia of fraud. The Cortes of Spain has 431 
members ; of these the conservative or government 
party have elected some 300 not by anything of a 



176 



AGGIE LIFE. 



popular vote but by means of a system of force and 
fraud which has never been matched here or else- 
where. The conservatives are declared elected with- 
out regard to the poll against them and the whole 
power of the government faction was employed to 
defeat any real expression of the electorate. In these 
Spanish elections every thing was cut and dried with 
a view of securing a majority in the Cortes favorable 
to the prosecution of war in Cuba and the voting of 
supplies for that purpose. In this election only four 
islanders were allowed to be elected. Americans 
know what "taxation without representation" means 
and it would seem very plain what reason the people 
of Cuba have for making the protest against the rule 
which is imposed upon them from Madrid. 



There is a plan on foot to erect the largest astro- 
nomical laboratory in the world on the summit of 
Mount San Miguel near San Diego. It is to be an 
international observatory and is to be fitted with two 
of the largest telescopes in the world. These with 
the great Lick telescope on Mount Hamilton ought to 
make California a great center for astronomers. 



The following is a concise statement which ap- 
peared in one of our dailies a few days since and goes 

to show what the bicycle has done in the United 
States. 

Bicycle riders in the U. S. 4,000,000 

Riders in N. Y. city, 200,000 
Riders spend each year in caring for 

their wheels and on excursions, $200,000,000 
Reputable wheel manufacturers in 

the country, 250 

Capital invested in these plants, $60,000,000 

Persons employed in these factories 70,000 
Persons employed in making bicycle 

sundries. 50,000 

Wheels turned out this season, 1,000,000 

Gain by riders in health and saving of 

doctors' fees, Untold Millions 

* * 

# 

The four cornered eight oared college boat race 

will be rowed on the Hudson at Poughkeepsie on Fri- 



day, June 26. The colleges represented are Colum- 
bia, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell and Harvard. 
No doubt those in charge of the race will make such 
arrangements as will secure a fair straightway course 
throughout the four miles. If this is done it will 
cause the contest to become a record mark as the 
crews have been in training a long time and the hosts 
of admirers and interested partisans that will be pres- 
ent will not be easily numbered. 



Collect f^otfs- 



— Commencement. 

— Aggie Life on deck again. 

— A man is known by the bills he leaves. 

— The artillery and sabre squads were photographed 
Tuesday, June 9th, by C. R. Kenfield of Amherst. 

— W. B. Harper, '96, was suddenly called home a 
few weeks ago on account of the death of his father. 

— Prof, and Mrs. Maynard gave a sunset tea to the 
Senior class, Thursday evening, June 4th, from four 
to six. 

— S. E. Smith, '99, who was obliged to go home 
early in the term on account of illness, has returned 
much improved in health. 

— Prof. H. W. Parker, a former professor of zool- 
ogy at this college, has recently published a book 
entitled " Agnostics' Gospel." 

— George Tsuda, '96, held an auction of a number 
of Japanese fans and knick-knacks last Wednesday 
night. John Marshall Barry, 97, officiated as auc- 
tioneer. 

— The following men have been chosen as candi- 
dates to speak for the Burnham Rhetorical prizes : 
Sophomores, Baxter, Eaton, Nickerson and Warden. 
Freshmen, Beaman, Dutcher, Hinds and Hubbard. 

— The Freshmen class had their " Mountain Day" 
June 4th. Leaving college with Prof. Smith, they 
drove to the Notch, where many fine specimens were 
found. A very pleasant and profitable time was 
enjoyed by all. 

— The appearance of the pond has been greatly 
improved by the planting of shrubbery and trees 
around its border. It was still further beautified 
during Commencement week by potted sub-tropical 
plants placed along its northern edge, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



177 



— A fine portrait of Ex-President Henry F. French 
of this college, has been presented to the library and 
will be placed in the library reading room among the 
portraits of other past presidents of M. A. C. Mr. 
French was the first president of the college. 

— The Q. T. V. fraternity held its grand lodge 
meeting with the Amherst chapter, Friday, May 29. 
Delegates were present from the Maine State Col- 
lege, N. H. State College, and from the Boston 
Alumni Chapter. Refreshments were served after- 
wards. 

— The tournament of the Tennis Association has 
been unusually exciting this term, owing to the fine 
prizes offered by the association. J. S. Eaton, '98, 
the winner of the singles gets the prize racquet, while 
G. A. Drew, '97, gets second. In doubles Eaton and 
Dutcher win, with Moore and Shaw second. 

— A large consignment of chemical apparatus and 
general supplies, ordered from Germany last fall, has 
just been received at the chemical laboratory. Those 
who have elected the subject of chemistry for Senior 
year, will evidently find an abundance of apparatus 
ready for their use, when they return in the fall 

— This afternoon, shortly after commencement 
drill, the class of '97 presented Lieut. Dickinson with 
a beautiful meerschaum pipe, as a token of their re- 
gard for him. We wish more of our faculty were like 
him. The committee chosen to purchase and present 
this gift, are C. A. Peters, J. Albert Emrich, and 
J. M. Barry. 

— Mr. George D. Leavens, who has been quite ill for 
several weeks, has recovered sufficiently to be about 
again, and has returned to his home in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. In a few days he expects to go to the cele- 
brated health resort at Clifton Springs, N. Y., for the 
summer, where it is hoped he will be completely 
restored to health. 

— An incandescent electric light has lately been 
placed on the keystone of the arch at the main 
entrance to the stone chapel, and like Portia's candle 
throws its beams afar on dark nights, lighting the way 
for the late wanderer. We hope that by the time 
college opens next fall other lights will be placed about 
the grounds at fitting places, so that instead of groping 
blindly around corners, and splashing through mud and 
water on rainy evenings, we may see our way and be 



able to proceed with some degree of comfort and 
safety. Let there be light ! 

— Lieut. W. M. Dickinson of the United States 
army, who has been commandant of the M. A. C. 
cadets for the past four years, is soon to leave to join 
his regiment at Columbus, Ohio. While on duty 
here, Lieut. Dickinson has worked hard and faithfully, 
and has greatly improved the military department of 
the college. He is a very able officer, and has been 
a liberal supporter of all that tends to raise the standard 
of the institution. He has always treated us with 
friendly respect, and gladly cooperated with us on all 
occasions when it was possible. His departure will be 
much regretted, not only by the students and faculty, 
but by his many friends about Amherst. 

— At 6 o'clock on the morning of May 30th, the 
M. A. C. artillery squads under the command of Lieut. 
W. M. Dickinson had their two cannon in position on 
Mt. Pleasant, and immediately after the sixth stroke 
of the Chapel clock pealed out, they began firing the 
national salute of forty-five guns, at the rate of four 
shots per minute. In the forenoon the college band 
played at Hadley, and in the afternoon, the battalion 
and band did escort duty to the G. A. R., afterwards 
firing a salute at the cemetery over the graves of the 
Rebellion's dead. Returning to town, a dress parade 
was given on the common, after which refreshments 
were served by the Woman's Relief Corps. The 
battalion returned to college about five o'clock. 

— On Friday evening, May 8th, the Junior class par- 
took of a banquet generously provided by the class of 
'99. The supper was served in the rooms of Messrs. 
Barr and Call of Northampton, and although the class 
was considerably smaller than it was on that memor- 
able " Freshman night " two years before, a fine 
time was enjoyed by all. The evening was perfect and 
the drive to " Hamp " was enlivened by many college 
songs. The toasts were as follows : 
Toastmaster. John M. Barry. 

Our College Paper, George D. Leavens. 

My Opinion of Chemistry and Horticulture. Charles A. Norton. 



Class of '97, 

Faculty and the C. G. S. system, 

How to become an athlete, 

Our Football Team, 

Heat, Light and Sound, 

College Associations, 

Alma. Mater, 



James L. Bartlett. 

J. Albert Emrich. 

L. Bert Cheney. 

John W. Allen. 

Clayton F. Palmer. 

Charles I. Goessmann, 

Herbert J, Armstrong, 



178 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The annual Freshman-Sophomore base-ball game 
was played on the campus Friday afternoon, May 29th. 
Considerable difficulty was experienced in arranging 
the game, as the Sophomore class would not play 
without Two Years '96, and the Freshmen objected to 
playing the two classes. The contest was very close 
but was won in the ninth inning by the Freshmen, 
who "touched up" Eaton for four runs, winning 
by a score of 8-7. The Freshmen made nine 
hits off the college pitcher, and the Sophomores seven 
off of Wright. The winning run was made with one 
man out. In the evening, the Freshmen in shirt-tail 
uniform gave a dress parade, serenaded the professors 
and after causing the old mortars to give forth a mono- 
phonic salute, placed their figures on the walk and 
went " quietly" to bed. 

— The college has recently been presented with a 
bust of the Hon. Justin S. Morrill of Vermont. Mr. 
Morrill is the father of all of the colleges of agricul- 
ture and mechanic arts in the United States, and his 
name well deserves to be honored by the thousands who 
are now enjoying the educational advantages offered 
by these colleges. Mr. Morrill when a national repre- 
sentative from Vermont, introduced in congress a bill 
called the Morrill act, giving to each state in the 
Union, land at the rate of 30,000 acres per representa- 
tive and senator from that state. The money obtained 
from the sale of this land was to be used in establish- 
ing colleges of agriculture and mechanic arts. After 
many failures, he succeeded in getting this bill passed, 
and on July 2, 1 862, it was signed by President Lincoln. 
The work of this man should interest us who are 
members of the M. A. C, especially, for our Alma 
Mater was founded under the bill for which Mr. Morrill 
worked so earnestly for years. 

— As a result of the competitive drill between M. 1. 
T., Harvard, Brown and M. A. C, which took place at 
Boston on Friday evening, May 15th., Lieut. -Governor 
Wolcott presented the prizes as follows : The first 
prize for battalion drill, a silk flag, was awarded to the 
M. I. T. battalion. The first prize for individual drill- 
ing in the manual of arms, a gold medal, was awarded 
to Lieut. W. M. Corse of M. I. T.; the second prize, 
a silver medal, was awarded to 1st Sergeant A. M. 
Kramer of the M. A. C. Though the M. A. C. was 
not entered for the battalion drill, in the individual drill, 



her detachment made a very good showing, and 
reflected much credit upon itself, and also upon the 
military department of the college. A large number 
of alumni of the college living in Boston and vicinity, 
were present at the drill, as well as a good delegation 
of students from the college. The head-quarters of 
the M. A. C. squad during their stay in Boston was at 
Copley Square hotel. 

— A few days ago there arrived at the College a 
valuable gift from the King, or Maharajah of Jeypore, 
India. It comes in the form of seven parts or port- 
folios called the "Jeypore Portfolios of Architectural 
Details." The work, as its title implies, is of an 
architectural nature, and was produced by young na- 
tives of India, proteges of the Maharajah, under the 
supervision of Colonel S. S. Jacobs, C. I. E., En- 
gineer to the Jeypore State, Rajputana. The work 
on these folios has been going on for several years, 
and Colonel Jacobs, in spite of his official duties, has 
spent a great deal of time upon them. It is a work 
that is of special value to the art student ; the plates 
contain elaborate designs of some of the finest archi- 
tecture in India, with descriptive notes concerning the 
places from which they were taken. With a very com- 
mendable liberality the Maharajah is donating these 
costly folios to such public institutions as apply for them 
for bona fide public use, providing that such institutions 
defray expense of packing and carriage. Six of the 
parts have already been received by President Goodell 
and the seventh and last is expected in a few days. 
The size of each plate of the first six parts is 22 inches 
by 15 inches, and of Part VII, 18 inches by 13 inches. 
The details have been reproduced to a large scale so 
as to not only be interesting to the student, but chiefly 
to serve as working Drawings for the Architect and 
artisan. The arrangement of the Portfolios is as 
follows : — 

Part 1. — Copings and Plinths: — 52 Plates, compris- 
ing 112 examples of Copings, and 20 of 
Plinths. 

" 2. — Pillars, Caps and Bases : — 79 Plates com- 
prising 158 examples, viz., 127 of Pillars, 
and 31 of Bases, (1 in color.) 

" 3. — Carved Doors : — 66 Plates, 1 1 representing 
inlaid ivory work printed in color, compris- 
ing 27 Doors, 98 Panels, and 74 other 
details. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



■79 



4. — Brackets : — 69 Plates, (2 colored), com- 
prising 86 examples. 

5. — Arches: — 58 Plates of which 10 are 
colored. 

6. — Balustrades : — 50 Plates, comprising 5 1 
examples, (1 in color) ; many of the panels 
are filled with tracery. 

7. — String and Band Patterns : — 64 Plates, 
comprising 326 examples, (75 in color), all 
taken from native buildings in India. 



BASEBALL. 
M. A. C. 18 ; Hamilton, A. C, 11. 
On May 9th the ball team won over the Hamilton 
Athletic Club of Holyoke in a loosely played contest. 
Eaton fell off on his good work of the week before, and 
allowed too many hits, which combined with the poor 
support given him, netted the visitors eleven runs, 
though none were earned. Shaw played first in the 
absence of Leamy and played a good game ; how- 
ever, as usual, he got in one of his erratic throws 
which fortunately did not cost any runs. Warden was 
way off in his work in the field, muffing the easiest 
kind of a fly, and allowing two balls to get by him, pre- 
sumably to show his great humping powers. The 
sensation of the game was a home run by Eaton- 
Sometimes such things will happen! Marshall made a 
couple of timely two baggers, while he and Warden, 
each stole three bases, and between them made seven 
runs. For Hamilton, Roun put up a fine game at 
first, playing the bag in the old fashion way, using a 
glove intead of a mit. Grinley as backstop made 
many difficult stops and threw finely to bases. 



Emrich, 2b., 
Warden, m., 
Shaw, lb., 
Marshall, capt., 3b., 
Hooker, r.f,, 
Read, s.s., 
Hinds, l.f., 
Capen, c, 
Eaton, p.. 

Total, 



Grin'ey, c, 
Gleason, s.s., 
Sheehan, 2b„ 3b„ 
Gilday, p., 2b., 
Roun, lb., 
Donaghue. m., 
Dillon. 3b.. p., 
Manning, l.f.. 
Bowler, r.f.. 



B.H. 


1-2 

1 
2-4 

3 
2 

1-3 



2-7 



P.O. 

2 

1 
15 

1 

2 

6 




12-22 27 



HAMILTON A. C. 



B.H. 
1 
1 



1-2 
3-5 





1 





6 

3 

11 

2 
2 




2 
1 
1 
4 

2 
1 
2 
3 

16 



M. A. C, 17; Williston, 16. 
The first of the series with Williston was played on 
May 13th; and after a very spirited contest, was won 
in an exciting finish, in the last half of the ninth inn- 
ing. Although the game was full of errors, yet, it 
was not without interest, as each side in its turn 
gained the lead and the winners could not be picked 
until Leamy made his timely base hit, after two men 
were out, which brought in the winning run. Batting 
clothes had been put on for the occasion evidently, 
nineteen hits with a total of twenty-one were made off 
Ely, while Eaton was touched up all ever the field for 
three, three baggers, two, two baggers, and any quan- 
tity of singles. Both third basemen had an off day 
and vied with one another in making the rankest 
errors, Sands, though playing poorly in the field, dis- 
tinguished himself by making five hits, one of them a 
three bagger. MacNamara at second played an error- 
less game, accepting ten chances in all. Cook played 
his usual game. 





M. 1 


\. C. 
















B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Emrich, 2b., 






3 


4 


1 


4 


Warden, m.. 






2 


3 





1 


Shaw, lb.. 






2-5 


7 





1 


Marshal!, capt., s.s.. 






1 


1 


2 


1 


Leamy, c, 






3 


8 


1 


1 


Hinds, l.f.. 






3 


2 





1 


Read. 3b.. 






2 





3 


6 


Hooker, r.f., 






1 


1 





6 


Eaton, p., 






1 





1 





Total, 






19-21 


26 


8 


14 




WILLISTON. 
















B-H- 


P-O, 


A, 


E. 


Fraunfelter, m-, 






3-5 


3 


2 


1 


Sands, capt., 3b., 






5-7 


3 


1 


4 


Day, lb., 






2 


4 








Cook, c., 






2-4 


6 


2 





Wiethanper, r.f-, 






3 


1 








Flower, s.s., 






1 








3 


Davis, s-s., 















1 


MacNamara, 2b.. 






1-2 


8 


2 





Ely, 






2 





3 





Dart, 






1-2 


1 





2 



Total, 7-10 24 14 14 

Two-base hits — Warden, Marshall 2. Three-base hit — Hinds. Home 

run — Eaton. Struck out — by Eaton 5 , Gilday 1 , Dillon 2. Double plays — 

Marshall and Emrich, Capen and Shaw. Umpires — Burrincfton '96, Harper 

'96, M. A. C. 



Total, 20-28 26 10 II 

Two-base hits — Shaw 2, MacNamara, Dart. Three-base hits — Cook, 
Sands, Fraunfelter. Base on balls — by Eaton 1 , Ely 1 . Struck out — by 
Eaton 7, Ely 3. Umpires— Goessmann, M. A. C '97, Kaeppel, W. S. 

Williston, 19 ; M. A. C, 6. 

The ball season closed with the final game at East- 

hampton June 6. Williston had the best of the game 

from the start scoring six runs in the first inning. The 

College was unable to hit Pond for some unaccount- 

! able reason and in this, mainly, lies the fault of de- 
feat. Leamy was away so that Shaw could not be put 
into the box, Eaton was hit too hard in the former 
game, so Read was tried as pitcher and should have 
won the game had he been afforded any support. 
Eaton went to first and Shaw to short stop ; the latter 

! had had no practice whatever in this position during 
the week and consequently played a rank game. 

j Emrich did not play his usual good game in the field. 

For Williston, Cook entirely carried the day, his 

throwing to second was immence, not a man stealing 

on him. Pond as a pitcher was rather puzzling ; he 

had small curves, if any, he did not have speed, 



i8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and he didn't frighten anybody by his motions, but he 
threw the ball and you struck the air, at least it so 
happened for thirty-six times, and to him lies the 
credit of the victory. The score : 



Emrich, 2b„ 


1-2 


3 





3 


Hooker, r.f., 


1 


2 








Shaw, s.s., 








1 


7 


Marshall, capt., 3b., 


2-4 


4 


3 


I 


Hinds, l.f., 


1-2 











Warden, m.. 


1 


1 








Eaton, lb., 





5 





2 


Read, p., 


1 


2 


8 





Capen, c. 





7 





1 


Totals, 


6-10 


24 


12 


13 


WILLISTON. 










B.H. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Frauntfelter, m., 





3 


I 


1 


Sands, capt., 3b., 


2-4 


1 





1 


Day, lb., 


1 


2 


1 





Cook, c, 


2 


14 


3 


1 


Weithanper, r.f.f 











2 


MacNamara, 2b., 


1 1 


6 





1 


Flower, 


2-3 


1 





2 


Dart, 


1 


1 





1 


Pond. 


2 





13 






Totals, 4-14 27 17 9 

Two-base hits — Emrich, Hinds, Flower. Three-base hits — Marshall. 
Sands. Base on balls— by Read 2, Pond 2. Struck out— Read 7, Pond 12. 
Umpires— Burrington, M. A. C. '96. Kaeppel of Williston. 

The Park Athletics defeated the M. A. C. ball club 
to-day on the common by the score 20-7. The Col- 
lege boys were evidently disturbed by the superabun- 
dance of encouragement afforded by the numerous 
race of snivelling, dirty and neglected hoodlums, 
that filled the side-lines, over ran the outfield, and 
crowded upon the diamond jeering the visiting players 
unmercifully. Shaw, the College pitcher, was put out 
completely giving so many bases on balls that he prac- 
tically lost the game though the Athletics could not 
touch him when he got the ball over the plate. In 
the fourth inning Eaton was put in the points, but 
could not pull out a victory. The Park Athletics are 
just back from defeating the strong Orange Athletic 
club, and by defeating Aggie add another victory to 
their long list. J. Karney, Sawin and T. Karney 
played the best game for the home team ; Leamy 
and Marshall for the College. 



PARK ATHLETICS. 










b.h. 


P.O. 


A. 


E- 


J. Dillon, s.s-, 


1-2 


2 


2 





J. Karney, c., 


3 


4 


5 





F. Karney, 1 b., 


1-2 


6 








James Karney, m., 


2-5 








1 


Barrett, r-f., 


3-5 











Sawin, 3b., 


3-5 


2 


1 





Swerney, 2h. f 


3-5 


6 


2 


1 


T. Dillon, l.f., 


2-4 


1 





1 


Smith, p., 


2-3 





4 


1 


Tot/, 


20-34 

AGGIES. 


21 


14 


4 




E.H- 


P.O. 


A. 


E- 


Emrich, 2b., 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Warden, m., 


2-3 











Shaw, p., lb-, 


2-4 


8 


4 





Marshall, capi., c.c, 


2-4 


2 


4 


1 


Leamy, c., 





8 


1 


1 


Hooker, r-f., 


1 











Read, s.s., 








2 





Hinds, l.f., 


2-3 


1 





2 


Eaton, lb., r.| 








4 


2 



Totu!, 



1 1-19 



Two-base hits— Warden, Shaw, Marshall 2, Hinds, Swerney 2, T. 
Karney, J- Dillon, Barrett 2, Sawin 2, T. Dillon 2, Smith- Home runs — 
Shaw, James Karney- Struck out— by Smith 3, by Shaw and Eaton 8* 
Umpires — Keefe of Holyoke, Burrington, M- A. C- '96- 



MILITARY APPOINTMENT. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Headquarters Clark Cadets. 

Orders} Amherst, Mass., June 16,1896. 

No. 46. ) J 

I. All orders pertaining to appointments of officers 
and non-commissioned officers, in the battalion of 
cadets, are hereby revoked. 

II. The following appointments in the battalion of 
cadets are hereby announced. 

COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

To be Cadet 1st Lt. and Adjutant, G. W. Leavens 
1st Lt. and Quartermaster, J. L. Bartlett 
1st Lt. and Fire Marshall, H. J.Armstrong. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

To be Cadet Sergeant Major, A. Montgomery, Jr. 
Quartermaster Sergeant, J. P. Nickerson. 



COMPANIES. 



To be Cadet Captains, 



To be Cadet First Lieutenants, 



To be Cadet Second Lieutenants, 



To be Cadet First Sergeants, 



To be Cadet Sergeants, 



(]. M. Barry. 
■} J. A. Emrich. 
( P. H. Smith. 

( C. I. Goessmann. 
■\ J. W Allen. 
( C. A. Peters. 



(G.. 
< H. 



To be Cadet Corporals, 



To be Cadet Drummer, 



A. Drew. 
.. F. Allen. 
( C. A. Norton. 

( L. L. Cheney. 
\ C. F. Palmer. 
( L. F. Clark. 

f R. D. Warden. 
| W. L. Fisher. 
J J. S. Eaton, 
i G. H. Wright. 

C. G. Clark. 

A. G. Adjenian. 

E. M. Wright. 
D. A. Beaman. 

F. H. Turner, 
"j J. R. Dutcher. 

j G. C. Hubbard. 
IA. A. Boutelle. 

C. M. Walker. 



They will be respected and obeyed accordingly, 

W. M. Dickinson, 
Lieut. U. S. Army, Commanding. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



181 



THE GRADUATING CLASSES. 



FOUR YEAR S CLASS. 



Horace Clifton Burrington, 
Frank Lemuel Clapp, 
Allen Bradford Cook, 
Frank Edmund de Luce, 
Harry Taylor Edwards, 
Stephen Whitcomb Fletcher, 
James Fabens Hammar, 
Walter Benjamin Harper, 
Benjamin Kent Jones, 
Asa Stephen Kinney, 
Albin Maximilian Kramer, 
Patrick Arthur Leamy, 
James Laird Marshall, 
Henry Ward Moore, 
Erford Wilson Poole, 
Isaac Chester Poole, 
Robert Parker Nichols, 
Charles Allen Nutting, 
William Lewis Pentecost, 
Frederick Henry Read, 
Harry Howard Roper, 
Seijrio Saito, 

Salome Sastre de Verand, 
Merle Edgar Sellew, 
Frederic Bridgeman Shaw, 



Charlemont. 

Dorchester. 

Petersham. 

Warren. 

Chesterfield. 

Rock. 

Swampscott. 

Wakefield. 

Middlefield. 

Worcester. 

Clinton. 

Petersham. 

South Lancaster. 

Worcester. 

North Dartmouth. 

North Dartmouth. 

West Norwell. 

North Leominster. 

Worcester. 

Wilbraham. 

East Hubbardston. 

Nemuro, Japan. 

Tabasco, Mexico. 

East Longmeadow. 

South Amherst. 



Lucius Jerry Shepard, Oakdale. 

Newton Shultis, Medford. 

George Tsuda, Tokyo, Japan. 

TWO year's class. 



Leon Rutherford Alexander, 
Eugene Frederick Barrett, 
Elwyn Winslow Capen, 
Robert Parker Coleman, 
John Alden Davis, 
Harry Porter Dickinson 
Williams Eaton, 
Leon Emory Lincoln, 
Benjamin Stedman, 



East Northfield. 

Framingham. 

Stoughton. 

West Pittsfield. 

East Longmeadow. 

Sunderland. 

North Middleborough. 

Taunton. 

Chicopee. 



7 1 . — The class of 7 1 will hold its 25th anniversary 
dinner on the college grounds on Tuesday of Com- 
mencement week. 

72. — A report has been received that Frank B. 
Salisbury died of fever at So. Africa. 

75. — John A. Barri, Dealer in Hay, Grain and 
Fertilizers. Address Barri & Kirkham, Berkshire 
Mills, No. 294 Washington Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

76. — Address of Hiram Kendall is Kingston, R. I. 

78. In a recent Journal of the American Medical 



H^ Walking's Too Slow 



Who wants to spend half the day going 
and coming! Let the swiftness of a 

Stearns Wheel 

— The Yellow Fellow — 

save time for you. It is known as the fast, easy- 
running, much-talked-about Stearns. It is the 
lightest, strongest, speediest of them all. Beauti- 
fully finished in orange, or black if you prefer it. 

E. C. Stearns & Co., Makers, Syracuse, N. Y. 
San Francisco, Cal. Toronto, Ont. 



182 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Association there appears an address on " Medical 
Associations and Ideals " by Dr. J. N. Hall, the retiring 
president of the Denver and Arapahoe Medical Asso- 
ciation. Dr. Hall is professor of Materia Medica, 
Therapeuticus and Clinical Medicine in the University 
of Colorado, Denver, Colo. 

78. — Address of Horace E. Stockbridge is Amer- 
icus, Ga. 

'80.— Address of William C. Parker is No. 141 
Milk St., Boston. 

'80. — A. H. Stone is staying at Phillipston. 

'81. — C. A. Bowman, First Assistant Engineer, 
Reservoir Department, Metropolitan Water Board, 
stationed at West Boylston. 

'81.— F. H. Fairfield, Chemist for the New York 
Extract Co. Address No. 107 West Broadway, N.Y. 

Ex-'82. — H. F. Stone, Teacher in Polytechnic 
Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'88.— Address of F. F. Noyes is No. 1720 2d Ave., 
Columbus, Ga. Mr. Noyes is with the firm Noyes, 
Hollis & Moore, electricians, and has charge of the 
Electrical Department of the Columbus St. Railway 
Co. 

'89.— Address of R. P. Sellew is Cleveland, Ohio. 
Care Cleveland Linseed Oil Co. 

'91. — Frank L. Arnold, married at Gloucester, 
Mass., Apr. 21st, to Miss Bertha M. Kimball. In the 
Aggie Life of Apr. 22d there was an incorrect notice 
of Mr. Arnold's marriage, and we take this opportunity 
to correct our mistake and publish the notice correctly. 

'91. — H. T. Shores, married June 10th to Miss 
Mabel Laura Demond at Northampton. Mr. Shores 
is a Physician in Northampton. 

'92. — W. I. Boynton, Practicing Physician in 
Buena Vista, Oregon. Expects to take a Special 
Medical Course in the University of California this 
year. 

'93. — G. F. Curley is to take the position of Resi- 
dent Physician of the General Hospital, Elizabeth, 
N.j. 

'93. — F. H. Henderson in City Engineer's office, 
Brookline. 

'94. — A. C. Curtis has resigned his position at St. 
Austin's School, West Brighton, N. Y. 

'94. — P. E. Davis, Superintendent of a gentleman's 
farm in Dedham. 

'94. — T. F. Keith with Boston Globe. Address No. 
106 Chandler St., Boston. 

'94. — On April 8th, James Anderson Lounsbury, 
of Mowbray, Cape Colony, Africa, won for his father 
C. P. Lounsbury, the '94 class cup. 

'95. — C. B. Lane, Assistant in Dairying at the New 
Jersey Agricultural College. Address New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. 



BiLLlApi P OOL PjRLOf. 

^SiiSp 

THE BEST IN THE CITY. 



John Parnei 



13, 15 & 17 Plkasant St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



W. W. BOVCTTOET, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Pineapple, Lemon anrl German Tonic, Birch Beer anil Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order. 



River Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



nted-Io Idea SSS, 

Protect your ideas; thev may bring you wealth. 
Write JOHN WEDDERBtJRN & CO., Patent Attor- 
neys, Washington, D. C, f or their ®1,S00 prize offer 
find list of two hundred inventions wanted. 

J Q times out of J (J 

The New York Journal recently of- 
fered ten bicycles to the ten winners 
in a guessing contest, leaving the 
choice of machine to each. 

ALL CHOSE 

Columbia 

Bicycles 

Nine immediately, and 
one after he had looked 
at others. The Journal 
therefore bought TEN 
Columbias at $J00 each. 

On even terms a Columbia will be chosen 

TEN times out of TEN* 



POPE MANUFACTURING CO. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 
1896 Art Catalogue for two 2-cent stamps. 

S5J. I*. BBNNJ5TT, Agent. 




AGGIE LIFE. 



S€lal J*Iiil,RB'S 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 
Prompt attention given to students. 



A.. J. SCHILIvARE, 

10S Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Telephone connection. 



COAL. ANO WOOO . 

TKOMAS C. DILLON, 

DEALER IN 

HARD AND FREE BURNING £Q; 

OF THE BEST QUALITY. 

Orders by mail "will receive prompt attention. 

Residence, South Prospect St. 



LITTLEFIELD'S 



'BILLIARD AND READING PARL 



OLD ARMORY BUILDING. 



18 50. 



-GO TO- 



1895. 



VELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and Group [flofk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF^THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



E. R, 



£TT, 



Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 



First door from Post Office. 



FINE GOODS. 
LOW PRICES. 
GOOD WORK GUARANTEED. 



C. S. GA'iES, D. D. S. 

E. 1ST. BROWN, D. D. S. 



Cutler's Block, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Office Hours : ll a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

P :, raeffeal number's 

STEAM AND GAS FITTER. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

RANGES, HEATING STOVES, TIN WARE, &c. 
HOT AIR FURNACE HEATING, 

ALSO 

STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



AND 



[RINGS FOR VIOLIN, MM km GUITAR. 






A' OJt THAMPXON. 



erchant Tailor 

Business Suits, $19. 
Custom Pants, $4.50 

REPAIRING AND PRESSING AS ADVERTISED. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



Burt House, opposite the old Alpha Delta Phi House. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



as^ss^^^sssaESEi-as 



DUNLAP HATS. 



MONARCH SHIRTS. 



Charles B 



© 




IL/W' a. Km 



NORTHAMPTON. 



FINE CLOTHING 

AND FURNISHINGS. 



E. & W. COLLARS & CUFFS. 
FINE NECKWEAR. 




ICJJCI 

Are in Demand 
Are Satisfactory 



$ 



75 



Wfk rth Delivered 

1 2> Promptly 
<Jp on Receipt 



Promptly 

$ ioo » 583 



...Send for Catalogue... 
Queec Gty Cycle Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 



AMHERST HOXTSE 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed and Shaving Supplies always on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



fllassaehusetts Agricultural College. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE FARM 



WE HAVE PURE BRED 

Perciieron Horses and Sonioi Sleep, 

And we beg to annouuce that we usually have a surplus 
stock of these breeds for sale at reasonable prices. 
For information address, 

WM. P. BROOKS, Amherst, Mass. 

MASS^GRICULTL!F(AL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

■ 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the public 

generally, that we are prepared to supply 

in limited quantities 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 

SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS 

TRUE TO NAME, ALSO 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

ALL AT THE LOWEST PRICE. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

PROF. S. T. MAYNARD, 

AMHERST. MASS. 

FINE METAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS. 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.06 UP. VERT HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



0. G. COUCH & SON'S. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



E. B. mC&INBDN, E. E. B. 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours : 
o to 12 -a.- d/z-, 1-30 to 5 e». ivt. 



Ether and Nirous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



yocR§ 



si BBQ ■ 



U 



Livery and Feed Stable, 

OMNIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE 

TEAMS. 



PRICES REASONABLE 

PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBEIS GOODS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JtST Repairing done while you wait,JE& 
9 PHOENIX ROW. 



BOARDING 



Livery, Feed and Exchange Stable. 

Hacks to and from all trains. 
SLEIGHS AND WAGONS FOR SALE. 



Chase's Bartt, 



Amherst, Mass. 



M. N. SPEAR, 



or, siatM 



) 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 
SECOKD-HAND TEXT BOOKS BOUGHT and SOLO 

AMHERST, MASS. 

PARISEAU BROTHERS, 
HiLIR DRESSING ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED, BARBERS' SUPPLIES FOR SALE. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 
DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING TACKLE 
AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, Sporting and Springfield rifles. 
Sunday and night call : responded to at residence, first door 
west of Chase's Block. 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

^ Co-Operative Steam Laundry * 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

ASKl© Agent, C. 1^. PALMER '&T-. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

fsrsatisfaotion quahanteed. s© 5 
Office : 
Next Dook West of Amity St. School House. 



LOUIS F. LEGARE, 

ery, feed and 



Special attention given to barge and party work. 

PRICES REASONABLE. 

Telephone No. 16-4. 

Pleasant Street, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AGGxE LIFE. 



BUY TOUR SUPPLIES OF 



FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Seymour, West Mercantile and Waterman. 

Botany Supplies, Son Paper, Lem 

HERBARIUM SLIPS, &c. 

STATIONERY, PAPER, 

wholesale and retail at prices which defy competition. 



CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, 

FRESH TWICE A WEEK. 

In fact everything •which a student may find himself in need 

ol from a box of Pens to a glass of Boynton's 

Celebrated Gloria can be had at 

Bin Brotuers' Great Bargain Emporium. 



ifT 



j?)^i 



The Photographer from Boston, 



5? 



>\3 



HAS BEEN SELECTED TO DO THE 



CLHSS WORK FOR GLASS GF S6, JH.H.G. 



GEO. H. HASTINGS, 
146 Tremont St., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



For Low Prices and Good Quality of Goods go to 

JACKSON & CUTLER. 

Tliey make a specialty of 

GENT'S MERINO UNDERWEAR. 

There you will be sure to get suited from such a 
complete stock. 

Gents' Ties, Collars and Cuffs. 

Laundered Shirts, Dress Shirts, 

Night Shirts, Suspenders, 

Hosiery, and Heavy Mittens and Gloves 



W. BLQH&ETT & EEL, 

Merchant Tailors 



AND DEALERS IN ■ 



READY-MADE GLOTHING. 

We give you a watch worth $5.00 with Suits, Coals and Ulsters. 

Suits made to order in our own workshop, $20 up. 

Trousers, $5 up. 

Jgp-Repairing neatly done at short notice. 



&B3. 1ST. Bladgetfc & On. 

COLLEGE CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, 

Books, Stationery, Athletic Goods. 

We cater especially to the student trade. Our stock of Paper, 
Covers, Note Hooks, larccst and best. Our prices lowest. 



OPPOSITE TOWH HALL. 



Our store has been repaired and improved throughout, and 
our stock of 

Furniture, Carpets, Draperies, Siiades,etc, 

is all new. We solicit an inspection. 



R. B. EDWARDS, 

25 and 27 Pleasant St., - Northampton, Mass.